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Full text of "Academic catalog"

Newton College 


Academic Catalog 1973-74 


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Newton, Massachusetts 02159 



Newton College Academic Catalog 1973-74 

Newton, Massachusetts 02159 



All students are responsible for knowing the information, 
policies and procedures stated in this catalogue. 

The Co//ege reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog. 



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Table of Contents 

Introduction / 3 

Women at Newton College / 5 

Admissions / 11 

Fees and Expenses / 15 

The Curriculum / 21 

Courses of Instruction / 28 

Division of Fine Arts / 29 

Division of Humanities / 39 

Division of Science and Mathematics / 58 

Division of Social Sciences and Religion / 67 

Division of Special Programs / 84 

Registry / 90 

Index / 99 



Introduction 

Newton College is a residential liberal arts college for women 
located in the suburb of Newton, Massachusetts, seven nniles 
west of Boston. 

The College and the adjoining Country Day School were founded 
by the Society of the Sacred Heart, a religious society that 
began in France in 1800. For more than 170 years on every 
continent, the Society has carried out its mission, the education 
of young women. Both the College and the Country Day School 
remain dedicated to the work of the Society: the instruction of 
mind and spirit that will enable women to think for themselves 
and, with sensitivity and sound judgement, to influence their 
surroundings no matter what their role in life may be. 

Newton offers a curriculum that combines its historical inheritance 
with what its faculty and administration perceive to be the best 
thinking in liberal arts education. Academic offerings on 
campus are supplemented through a system of cross-registration 
with neighboring Boston College and through field work 
opportunities that enable students to take advantage of the 
political, social and cultural resources of Boston. 

Newton College offers a community in which the individual is 
important. The student body numbers less than 900; the 
environment is personal. While it is ultimately each student's 
responsibility to make of her college experience what she will, 
members of the faculty and administration can give her the 
support and guidance she needs as she grows into the person 
she aspires to be. 




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Women at Newton College 



Newton College has traditionally taken seriously the 
intellects and aspirations of women. The College 
continues to do so today, in an atmosphere that em- 
phasizes personal choice and commitment. 

Newton women care about the quality of their lives 
and education. The sense of community is strong at 
Newton, as students and faculty pursue their inter- 
ests with respect for each individual's methods and 
goals. Diversity is encouraged. There is no typical 
Newton student, as the College seeks mature young 
women with individual styles and opinions. In the 
last twenty-five years, the community has broadened 
to include women from every state and thirty foreign 
countries. The sense of community remains as 
strong as it was when the College began in 1946. 
Mutual trust among students, faculty, religious and 
administrators makes possible freedoms and respon- 
sibilities not to be found on many other campuses. 

Living Environment 

The College, with the Country Day School, is situated 
on seventy peaceful, wooded acres just outside of 
Boston. Within minutes of the College, however, are 
some of the most distinguished universities, labora- 
tories, hospitals, museums, public broadcasting 
agencies, galleries, libraries, theatres, orchestras 
and publishing houses in America. These places are 
stimulating and liberating for the woman who is able 
to use the environment to pursue those interests and 
associations unique to her own personality. 

Entering freshmen and members of the junior class 
arrive at the College each Fall several days earlier 
than sophomores and seniors. Each freshman is 
assigned a "junior sister" who establishes contact 
with her during the summer months and is here to 
welcome her. Volunteer groups of juniors, along with 
the faculty, acquaint freshmen with the campus, and 



explain the function and operation of the various 
academic and governing elements within the College. 
They also guide them through a weekend of tours, 
mixers and other social events to give each woman 
a grasp of the cultural and recreational advantages 
of Boston and a sincere welcome to the community of 
Newton College. 

Newton College has six residence halls each of 
which accommodates from 100 to 150 students. 
Women live in either single or double rooms, although 
a few rooms for three or four are available to upper- 
classmen. The cost of all rooms is the same, and 
students may change rooms and residence halls from 
year to year. 

Members of all four classes live in each residence 
hall, sharing its formal and informal lounges, kitch- 
enette, television sets, laundry, telephones and com- 
munity life. All students are permitted to have cars 
on campus. Each residence hall complex has, in 
residence, a Director, Assistant Director and a Resi- 
dent Assistant. The Director is a young married 
woman whose husband is a graduate student in one 
of the nearby universities. These young adults serve 
as friends and advisors to students. 

Day students commute from their homes in the 
Boston area. These "off-campus" students have a 
lounge and kitchenette of their own and participate 
fully in College life. Several rooms in residence halls 
are reserved for the overnight use of day students. 

The College facilities are relatively new. Its stu- 
dent union, classrooms, libraries, laboratories, 
chapel, infirmary, offices, residence halls and multi- 
media facilities are modern and well designed. Add- 
ing to the character of the campus are the two large 
and architecturally interesting estates of the Harri- 
man and Schrafft families. 

The Putnam Art Center, formerly the Harriman 
residence, served as the College library until 1966. 




It was rededicated in 1967 and named for Roger 
Lowell Putnam, a long-time benefactor and Trustee 
of the College. It contains studios and classrooms, 
the art slide collection, the Art Department office and 
a circular exhibition staircase. The Putnam Art Cen- 
ter has become a forum for artistic and creative work. 
Barat House, formerly the country house of the 
Schrafft family, is named for Sister Madeleine Sophie 
Barat, the foundress of the Society of the Sacred 
Heart. It is the original building of the College and 
now contains the President's Office, the Development 
Office and a number of reception rooms. 




student Governance 

The College expects that each student who has 
passed the College's entrance requirements is fully 
capable of accepting the responsibilities of member- 
ship in the community of Newton College. Accord- 
ingly, final responsibility for such College policies as 
affect student private and social life is vested in the 
students themselves. 

The Student Government Town Meeting is the 
recognized agency for student discussion, organiza- 
tion and action. It establishes and enforces standards 
and regulations in practically all matters of student 
affairs, including curfews and parietal regulations. It 
is also the function of the Town Meeting to coordinate 
and express student opinion; to initiate specific pro- 
posals to promote the welfare of the College; and to 
assist and supervise the effective functioning of stu- 
dent activities, organizations and social events. 

In addition, students serve on the Board of Trus- 



tees and on all of the College's Presidential Com- 
mitees, which make recommendations to the Presi- 
dent in all matters of College policy, ranging from 
academic standards to finances. 

As an organ of student government, the Student 
Academic Council serves as a communicating body 
among the students, dean and faculty on academic 
matters. The Council also sponsors cultural activi- 
ties, one of which is a series that brings distinguished 
scholars, artists and civic leaders to the campus at 
intervals throughout the academic year. 



Student Organizations 

Several organizations are sponsored by the students 
to benefit the College community. In the social and 
cultural areas, the Social Committee arranges events 
with the numerous colleges and universities in the 
area, and with the Interest Committee, keeps the 




student body informed of other social activities, in- 
cluding ski weekends, concerts, dances, exhibits, 
cinema and drama. Other on-campus activities in- 
clude the Chorus, which presents a number of single 
and joint concerts throughout the year, the Drama 
Club, which presents two productions annually, and 
the Newtones, a folk and pop singing group which 
performs throughout the Northeast and has issued 
several successful recordings. 

The student organizations jointly sponsor an an- 
nual Spring Festival at Newton College during which 
all of the arts are presented and celebrated. This 
event has become popular throughout the New En- 
gland area. Among the recent participants in Spring 
Festival have been Yousuf Karsh, Anthony Newman, 
Rolf Scharre, the German Center Boston Branch of 
the Goethe Institute, the Dawson-Eira Jazz Ensemble, 



the Elma Lewis National Center of Afro-American 
Artists, the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York, and numerous other singers, dancers, poets 
and artists. 

The Christian Service Committee is responsible for 
volunteer service work by Newton students in the 
Greater Boston area. Teaching in Roxbury, visiting 
hospitals, working with the mentally retarded, and 
serving as aides at Children's Hospital are a few of 
the many opportunities available to Nev/ton women 
interested in community service work. Students may 
work individually or in groups. The Christian Service 
Committee has always been open to experimental 
student-initiated projects. It promotes the spirit of 
Christian living on and off campus. Members pre- 
pare liturgical services and raise money to sponsor 
Lay Apostolate groups who spend two weeks at Easter 
and part of the summer vacation in deprived areas 
of Appalachia and the Ozarks. Students may par- 
ticipate in a variety of political organizations from 
the structured and long established Young Republi- 
can and Democrat Clubs to several ad hoc groups 
which come together for various projects. The Ath- 
letic Association sponsors activities such as basket- 
ball, horseback riding, volleyball, sailing, tennis, 
swimming, fencing and golf. In 1971, Newton's sail- 
ing team won first place honors in Northeast sailing 
competition and has placed in the Nationals three 
times in recent years. 

Many students find academic societies such as the 
Psychology Club and the French Club to be a means 
of sharing interests with others of similar mind. 
Newton publications such as 885, the College's 
weekly newspaper, The Idiom, a student literary 
magazine, and The Well, the College yearbook, are 
media for student creativity and expression. 

The Black Students' Organization was formed to 
facilitate interaction with other black student associa- 



tions in the Boston area. Members hope to establish 
a unified voice in matters that affect black students 
at Newton, to contribute to the black community in 
Greater Boston and to establish a source of aid and 
information for incoming and prospective black stu- 
dents. The International Club promotes cultural in- 
terchange among the various nationalities present on 
the Newton College campus. The students sponsor 
special social and cultural activities in conjunction 
with international clubs of the other Boston area 
colleges. 

The Experimental College at Newton, a student- 
initiated, student-run experiment in learning, re- 
sponds directly to the needs of the students and pro- 
vides a forum for faculty-student discussion of 
contemporary issues. The courses supplement the 
usual College curriculum. The test of Experimental 
College courses is relevance, and the courses are cre- 
ative and personal. This organization allows anyone 
to give or take a course, and there are no fees, tests, 
grades or credits. The only requirements are initia- 
tive and a genuine interest in learning through shar- 
ing openly with others. 





Social Life 

Diversity of styles, opinions, tastes and interests are 
both cultivated and welcomed. Most women take 
advantage of the varied resources and experiences 
of Boston. These experiences are, in turn, balanced 
by academic and social opportunities on the campus. 
Universities such as Harvard, M.I.T., Boston Uni- 
versity, Tufts, Brandeis, Northeastern, Boston Col- 
lege and Holy Cross are easily accessible. Students 
enjoy the restaurants, theatres, concerts, cinema, 
politics, art and historical sites of Greater Boston. 

Athletics 

Athletics at Newton are open to all students. Courses 
are given on campus in golf, tennis, badminton, 
physical fitness for women and other sports in which 
a substantial number of students express an interest. 
Nearby resources allow for instruction in swimming. 




sailing and iiorseback riding. No specific uniform is 
required but students are expected to wear appro- 
priate clothing, such as a blouse, shorts, socks and 
sneakers. 

There are opportunities on campus for interclass 
and interhouse games and tournaments in such ac- 
tivities as basketball, volleyball and tennis. On the 
intercollegiate level, the College has basketball, field 
hockey, volleyball, softball, tennis, swimming and 
sailing teams which participate with other colleges 
in the area. Games or meets have been arranged for 
this year with Boston College, Wellesley, Radcliffe, 
M.I.T., Brown, Regis, Emmanuel and Manhattanville. 

Religion 

The religious concerns of the College are formally 
expressed in several ways. The Religion Department 
addresses itself to problems of contemporary Catholi- 



cism as well as to the history and theology of other 
major religions in the world today. There is a College 
Chaplain, selected by the students, who lives on 
campus and is available for counseling. Religious of 
the Society of the Sacred Heart participate in both 
the academic and non-academic areas of College life. 
For those who wish to participate, liturgies are cele- 
brated daily. These liturgies take varying forms from 
Folk Masses in the residence halls to formal, organ- 
accompanied Chapel Masses. 

Counseling Services 

A variety of counseling services are available to stu- 
dents at the College. Formal academic counseling Is 
available from the Academic Dean's Office, the De- 
partment Chairmen and faculty advisors. Formal 
personal adjustment counseling may be arranged 
through the College Health Services. Psychiatric and 
psychological counseling services are provided by the 
Human Resource Institute or through consultation 
with the Nevrton College medical staff at the College 
infirmary. The Dean of Students, the Chaplain, the 
Director of Residence Life and the Residence Staff 
are available for informal personal counseling. 

Medical Services 

The services of the College physician and nurses 
are available to students at the Spellman Infirmary, 
a modern facility located on the campus. Twenty-four 
hour coverage in the infirmary is provided by regis- 
tered nurses, and the College physician is on call at 
all times. Consultants to the College Health Services, 
representing all specialties, serve on the faculty of 
the Tufts University School of Medicine and on the 
staff of St. Elizabeth's Hospital in nearby Brighton. 
In the event of serious illness, students are hospi- 
talized at St. Elizabeth's. 



10 



Admissions 



Admission Standards 

Applicants' secondary school academic records 
should be above average. The Admissions Commit- 
tee does recognize that some women have greater 
intellectual potential than their academic records in- 
dicate and willingly seeks evidence of this potential 
in their activities, interests or accomplishments. 

They should be capable of contributing to others 
in the demanding and rewarding community life of 
the College. Whether this potential contribution lies 
in artistic creativity, diversity of experience, leader- 
ship, moral strength or depth of personality, it must 
find a place in a living environment which demands 
initiative and self-discipline to be enjoyed. 

Newton students are expected to decide many 
issues for themselves while at the College; an appli- 



cant should, therefore, evidence the maturity neces- 
sary to assume adult responsibilities. The College 
actively seeks applicants from all races, nationalities, 
creeds and geographical locations. In all cases where 
an applicant has been accepted, every attempt will 
be made to find sufficient financial aid to enable her 
to attend if her personal or family resources would 
not otherwise permit her to do so. 

All correspondence regarding admission to Newton 
College should be addressed to: Director of Admis- 
sions, Newton College, Newton, Massachusetts 
02159. 

Application 

Application forms may be obtained from the Admis- 
sions Office. A fee of $15 must accompany the ap- 
plication and all applications should be submitted 
by February 15 of the applicant's senior year in high 
school. The application fee of a disadvantaged stu- 
dent may be waived upon the request of the student's 
guidance counselor. 

General Requirements for Admission 

To be considered for the freshman class, students 
should plan to complete sixteen secondary school 
units in college preparatory studies, including four 
years of English. 

Secondary School Transcript and Recommendation 

After the Admissions Office has received an applica- 
tion, a candidate should have her secondary school 
send to the Admissions Office a transcript of her 
grades and credits and a recommendation from the 
principal or guidance counselor. Forms will be pro- 
vided by the Admissions Office upon receipt of a 
student's application. 



11 



Interview 

A campus visit and a personal interview by an Ad- 
missions Officer are strongly recommended. If dis- 
tance makes this impossible, the Director of Admis- 
sions will, upon request of the candidate, arrange for 
an alumna or another representative of the College 
to contact the applicant for a personal interview. 



Visiting the Campus 

Newton welcomes visitors to the College. The Admis- 
sions Office in Stuart House is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and from 10:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday. By prior arrange- 
ment, special appointments may be made on Sunday 
and holidays. Rooms are available on campus for 
an overnight visit if a prospective student should be 
interested in staying in a residence hall and attending 
some classes. Arrangements for rooms may be made 
through the Admissions Office. 



College Entrance Tests 

All candidates for admission are required to take the 
College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Apti- 
tude Tests (SAT) no later than January of the senior 
year, and three Achievement Tests (including one in 
English Composition) by May of the senior year. The 
American College Testing Program series (ACT) may 
be submitted instead of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation series, and must be taken by January of the 
senior year. The dates on which an applicant plans 
to take the tests should be indicated on the applica- 
tion form. The candidate is responsible for request- 
ing that her scores be forwarded to Newton College 
by the appropriate testing service. 

The applicant may obtain the registration form and 



the dates of the tests from her guidance counselor 
or by writing directly to the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540; or in the western United States, western 
Canada, Australia, Mexico, Pacific Islands, to College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 1025, Berkeley, 
California 94701. For ACT test information, the ap- 
plicant may write to American College Testing Pro- 
gram, P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 52240. 

Early Decision Plan 

The Early Decision Plan is an alternative to the regu- 
lar admission procedure. It is available to those stu- 
dents who decide early that Newton College is the 
college they wish to attend and who agree not to 
apply elsewhere before December 1. A candidate 
must submit an application for admission and a 
statement obtained from the College that she is a 
candidate under the Early Decision Plan. She must 
submit all supporting credentials (high school tran- 
script, recommendations and SAT or ACT test scores) 
by November 1. 

Decisions concerning admission and financial aid 
will be mailed on December 1. A student accepted 
under the Early Decision Plan is required to make a 
non-refundable deposit of $200 by January 15. 

Rolling Admissions 

An application should be filed by February 15 of the 
candidate's senior year. Beginning December 15, 
the Committee on Admissions sends letters of ac- 
ceptance to those candidates who have completed 
their credentials and who have been awarded final 
acceptance by the Committee. A candidate must 
notify the Admissions Office of her decision by May 
1. If she is enrolling in the College, a non-refundable 



12 



deposit of $200 must accompany her reservation 
slip. This deposit will be credited against her tuition 
charges. 

Advanced Placement 

Advanced standing and/or credit may be given to 
students who receive scores of 3 or better in the Ad- 
vanced Placement Tests of the College Entrance 
Examination Board after their papers have been re- 
viewed by the appropriate department. Incoming 
freshmen should write to the Office of the Academic 
Dean to arrange for a review before entering Newton 
College in September. 

Foreign Students 

The entrance requirements for foreign students are 
substantially the same as for applicants who are 
United States citizens. In the case of applicants 
attending secondary schools where English is not the 
primary language, the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) is required in addition to the 
CEEB or ACT tests. If a student cannot obtain the 
registration forms and the dates of the CEEB or ACT 
tests at her secondary school, she should write di- 
rectly to the College Entrance Examination Board or 
American College Testing Program. It is expected 
that every applicant will be responsible for making 
the correct visa arrangements for attending school 
in the United States. If visa information is needed, 
assistance may be obtained from the Admissions 
Office. 



Early Admission 

A limited number of exceptionally qualified students 
may be admitted upon completion of their junior year 



of high school. To be eligible for such consideration, 
a student should present the same sixteen secondary 
school units in college preparatory studies including 
four in English as are required of senior high school 
applicants. In addition, the applicant must have a 
strong endorsement from her high school attesting 
to her personal and academic maturity and readiness 
for college study. 

Deferred Admission 

Some high school students today prefer to postpone 
college enrollment for one year, thus "taking a year 
off" for work, travel or non-college related study. The 
student may, however, want to complete the admis- 
sion procedure during her senior year to assure her- 
self of a place in the following year's freshman class. 
Newton subscribes to the policy of deferred admis- 
sion for one year. A student interested in this pro- 
cedure should complete her application stating her 
desire for deferred admission, and would be notified 
of the Admission Committee's decision during her 
senior year. She is obliged to pay a non-refundable 
deposit of $100 by May 1 and to pay the remaining 
$100 by January 1 of the following year. 

Transfer Students 

Newton College accepts freshman, sophomore and 
junior transfer students in the fall and at mid-year. 
Their records must satisfy the entrance requirements 
of the College and their previous college courses 
and grades should substantially satisfy Newton Col- 
lege requirements. 

Transfer students' applications for the fall semes- 
ter should be received by May 1. Applications for 
the spring semester must be received by November 
15. Transfer applicants will be considered after the 



13 



following credentials have been received: complete 
transcript of secondary school record, official tran- 
script of college record, a letter of clearance and 
recommendation from the Academic Dean or the 
Dean of Students of the institution previously at- 
tended and a recommendation from a professor. 
Liberal arts subjects in which the applicant has re- 
ceived a grade of C or better will usually be accepted 
for transfer credit but credits must always be re- 
viewed with the Office of the Academic Dean. Noti- 
fication of transferrable credits will be included with 
a letter of acceptance from the College. 

Ordinarily a transfer student must take 50% of 
her course work at Newton College in order to obtain 
a Newton College degree. In exceptional cases, the 
Admissions Voting Committee, acting with the head 
of the department in whicti the student will be major- 
ing and the Academic Dean, may allow a higher per- 
centage of outside credit, provided that no fewer than 
twelve units be taken at Newton College. 

Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses who transfer to Newton College 
from a university-affiliated nursing schol are con- 
sidered in the same category as other transfer stu- 
dents. The candidate's liberal arts courses (i.e.. 
Anatomy, Biology, Chemistry, etc.) in which she ob- 
tained a grade of C or better will usually be accepted 
for credit. Nurses who have graduated from a hos- 
pital non-degree-granting nursing school may obtain 
credit by examination for selected liberal arts 
courses. 



Continuing Studies 

The Continuing Studies Program at Newton College 
gives women whose academic careers have been in- 




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terrupted the opportunity to resume study on a full- 
time or a part-time basis. Women of any age and 
from a variety of academic and professional back- 
grounds are welcome. 

Several educational options, suitable to the indi- 
vidual needs and interests of the Continuing Studies 
student, are offered. Some women want to start or 
complete course work for their Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science degree; other women want to 
take courses in preparation for a new career, for 
enhancement of their professional capabilities, or 
simply for self-enrichment and enjoyment. 

Women may audit courses, attend short-term non- 
credit seminars, or enroll in a degree program. The 
flexibility of the program offers the opportunity for 
women to pursue their education while still fulfilling 
family or vocational commitments. Babysitting ser- 
vices can be arranged on campus. 

Women who are considering a continuation of their 
studies may obtain further information and indi- 
vidual attention in formulating their plans from the 
Center for Continuing Studies. 



14 



Fees and Expenses 



The costs to the student for a year at Newton College 
are explained below. 

Tuition, Room and Board 

TUITION: 

For the 1973-74 academic year tuition will be $1225 

per semester. 

ROOM AND BOARD CHARGE: 
The room and board charge for the 1973-74 aca- 
demic year will be $675 per semester. 

SCIENCE LABORATORY FEE: 

Students enrolled in science laboratory courses will 

be billed $25 per course as Science Laboratory Fee. 

STUDIO ART FEES: 

Studio fees, ranging from $5 to $25 per course, are 



charged for all studio courses. The fee for each 
course is listed on the course schedule. These fees 
do not cover all expenses the student incurs, but they 
do cover supplies the department provides for each 
class. 

EXTRA REGISTRATION FEE: 

Payment of the standard tuition charge by any stu- 
dent enrolled for both semesters of the 1973-74 
academic year entitles the student to enroll in a total 
of 8 units. $140 is charged for each 1/2 unit and 
$280 for each unit above the normal course load. 

AUDIT FEE: 

Full-time students may audit one course per semester 
without charge. Others are charged at the rate of 
$40 per unit. 

TUITION FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS: 
Part-time students may enroll for a maximum of 2 
units per semester. The tuition fee for such students 
will be $140 for V2 unit and $280 for 1 unit. 



SUMMARY OF BASIC FEES: 

Tuition for the academic year 

Room and board for the academic year 



Other fees 



$2450 
1350 

$3800 



APPLICATION FEE: 

A fee of $15 is charged for initial application to the 

College. This fee is non-refundable. 

LATE REGISTRATION OR CHANGE OF SCHEDULE: 
There is a $10 charge for registering after Registra- 
tion Day or for dropping a course after the deadline. 

LATE RESERVATION DEPOSIT: 
There is a $10 penalty charge for paying the Reser- 
vation Deposit after the deadline. 



15 



GRADUATION FEE: 

Students in the graduating class will be billed a $25 
graduation fee during the second semester of their 
senior year. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS: 
$25 per year, applicable to all resident students hav- 
ing automobiles on campus. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR COMMUTING STUDENTS: 
$15 per year, applicable to all commuting students 
having automobiles on campus. 

Reservation Deposit 

ENTERING STUDENTS: 

A candidate for admission is charged a fee of $15 for 
initial application. Upon notification that she has 
been admitted to Newton College, the candidate must 
return with her acceptance a Reservation Deposit of 
$200 which will be credited in full to her tuition bill 
for the first semester. The Reservation Deposit is 
non-refundable after the due date except to a stu- 
dent whose academic record at the end of her senior 
year in high school proves unsatisfactory. 

CURRENTLY ENROLLED STUDENTS: 
Students currently enrolled at the College who wish 
to reserve a place for the next academic year must 
submit a $200 Reservation Deposit by April 15. 
This deposit, which is credited in full to her tuition 
bill for the next semester, is non-refundable. 

Student Health Insurance 

The College's Student Health Insurance covers lim- 
ited medical and hospital expenses not included in 
the normal services of the Newton College Health 
Service. As students are normally covered by family 
insurance plans, the Student Health Insurance pro- 




vided by Newton College is designed to supplement 
such paid policies and is not intended to be a com- 
prehensive policy. Coverage is on an annual basis. 
A brochure describing coverage is forwarded to stu- 
dents and parents at the beginning of each academic 
year. Additional copies are available from the Col- 
lege Student Health Service. 

ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS BENEFITS 
The basic policy reimburses the policy holder the 
first $500 for covered injuries and illnesses. When 
the medical expense incurred for any covered injury 
or illness has exceeded the sum of $500, the com- 
pany will pay for 80% of the covered medical ex- 
penses in excess of $500 incurred within 52 weeks 
from the date of injury or first treatment for sickness 
up to a maximum of $1,500. The total maximum 
combined benefit is $2,000. 



16 



Schedule of Payments 

RESERVATION DEPOSIT 
Early Decision Applicants 
Entering Freshmen 
Currently Enrolled Students 

FALL SEMESTER TUITION, 
ROOM AND BOARD 



by January 15 
by May 1 
by April 15 



by August 15 

OTHER FALL SEMESTER CHARGES upon request 

SPRING SEMESTER TUITION, 

ROOM AND BOARD by January 15 

OTHER SPRING SEMESTER 

CHARGES upon request 

The College reserves the right to withhold academic 
credit, grades, transcripts and services to students 
failing to fulfill financial obligations to the College. 

Note: The College reserves fhe righf to change fees. 



Plans of Payment 

Many Newton College families have, in recent years, 
elected to meet College expenses from current in- 
come through tuition payment plans. Three such 
plans are endorsed by Newton College and further 
information may be obtained by writing directly to 
the addresses listed below. 

a) College Aid Plan, Inc. 
1030 E. Jefferson Blvd. 
South Bend, Indiana 46624 

6) Education Funds, Inc. 

E.F.I. Fund Management Corp. 
36 S. Wabash Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60603 



c) The National Shawmut Bank 
Tuition Aid Program 
542 Commonwealth Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 02215 

Refund Policy 

The tuition fee is not refundable after the tuition pay- 
ment deadlines (August 15 and January 15). The 
room and board fee may be returned on a pro-rata 
basis. 

Financial Aid 

The program for financial aid offered by Newton Col- 
lege is intended to provide educational opportunities 
for qualified students who could not otherwise afford 
to pay their full college expenses. Financial aid 
awards vary in amount according to individual need 
and are renewable yearly if the recipient maintains 
the established standards as a student and as a 
member of the College community. Continuing need 
must also be demonstrated. 

APPLICATION FOR FINANCIAL AID 
Each applicant for admission who desires financial 
aid must complete and file the following forms prior 
to the dates indicated: 

? . Newton College Application for Financial Aid 
This form should be requested from the Admissions 
Office with the request for an application for admis- 
sion. It must be returned to the Office of Financial 
Aid by November 1 for Early Decision applicants, and 
by February 15 for April Decision applicants. 

2. Parents' Confidential Statement 
This form is available in the secondary schools or 
may be obtained by writing to the College Scholar- 



17 



ship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
(Eastern Division); Box 881, Evanston, Illinois 60204 
(Middle States Division); or Box 1025, Berkeley, Cali- 
fornia 94701 (West and Southwest Division). This 
statement should be filed with the College Scholar- 
ship Service by October 1 for Early Decision appli- 
cants and by December 15 for other applicants. The 
Service will then forward a copy for confidential use 
to the college or colleges indicated on the form. The 
Newton College Financial Aid Committee utilizes the 
Parents' Confidential Statement as one guide in de- 
termining financial need. 

3. Federal Income Tax Form 7040 
Beginning September 1, 1973 the parents of financial 
aid applicants must submit an official copy of their 
preceding year's Federal Income Tax return. Form 
1040. Parents must request that the Internal Reve- 
nue Service send the official copy directly to the Di- 
rector of Financial Aid at Newton College. The Form 
1040 will be utilized by the College in determining 
financial aid awards for the 1974-75 academic year. 
A financial aid application will not be complete until 
the Form 1040 is received from the Internal Revenue 
Service. 




SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following forms of scholarship assistance are 

offered by Nev\^on College: 

7 . Scholarships for Early Decision Applicants 
Scholarships are awarded each year to exceptionally 
well-qualified Early Decision applicants who have 
demonstrated financial need. Application for such 
aid must be filed with Newton College by November 
1 of the applicant's senior year in high school. The 
Parents' Confidential Statement must be filed with 
the College Scholarship Service by October 1. This 
scholarship award must be accepted or refused by 
January 15. 

2. Scholarships for Rolling Decision Applicants 
Scholarships are awarded each year to exceptionally 
well-qualified applicants who have demonstrated fi- 
nancial need. Application for such aid with the 
family's Form 1040 must be filed with Newton Col- 
lege by February 1 of the applicant's senior year in 
high school. The Parents' Confidential Statement 
must be filed with the College Scholarship Service by 
December 15. This scholarship award must be ac- 
cepted or refused by May 1. 

3. Scholarships for Enrolled Students 
Scholarships are awarded each spring to resident 
and commuting students who need financial assis- 
tance and who have demonstrated scholastic ability 
during their attendance at Nev\^on College. Newton 
financial aid application forms and Parents' Confi- 
dential Statement forms may be obtained from the 
Financial Aid Office. The Parents' Confidential State- 
ment must be sent to the College Scholarship Ser- 
vice by January 15. The Newton College application 
form with the family's Form 1040 must be returned 
to the Financial Aid Office by March 15. 

Scholarships are made possible, either in whole 



18 



or in part, by the following contributions: 

The Newton College Alumnae Scholarship 

The Sister Gertrude Bodkin Memorial Scholarship 

The Barbara L. Burns Memorial Scholarship 

The Mary Corbett Cavanaugh Memorial Scholarship 

The Gael Coakley Memorial Scholarship 

The Maureen M. Cronin Memorial Scholarship 

The John R. Gilman Memorial Scholarship 

The Gail Hibschman Memorial Scholarship 

The Sister Eleanor S. Kenny Memorial Scholarship 

The Martin Luther King Memorial Scholarships 

The Cornelius C. Moore Scholarship 

The Janet Stuart Guild Scholarship 

The Michael E. Sweeney Scholarship 



FELLOWSHIPS 

In honor of Gabrieile Husson, R.S.C.J., the second 
President of Newton College, a grant is made an- 
nually to a member of the graduating class to help 
launch or sustain a project for fulfilling some con- 
temporary human need. The student to whom the 
award is made must be personally involved in and 
committed to this project. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Newton College sponsors a student employment pro- 
gram by which students who need financial aid can 
receive some assistance by working for the College. 
Correspondence regarding this part-time work should 
be addressed to the Director of Financial Aid. Ap- 
plications for student employment must be made by 
June 1 for the following year's assignments. 




LOANS 

Newton College cooperates with the various states in 
their guaranteed loan programs and with the United 
Students Aid Funds, Inc. Information regarding the 
terms and conditions of these loans may be secured 
from the Director of Financial Aid or from the higher 
education division of the state in which the applicant 
resides. 

FEDERAL PROGRAMS 

Nevrton College participates in programs of financial 
aid offered through the United States Office of Edu- 
cation. These programs are the National Direct Stu- 
dent Loan Program, the College Work-Study Program 
and the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
Program. Detailed descriptions of these are available 
from the Director of Financial Aid. 



19 




A 





The Curriculum 



Liberal arts education at Newton offers students the 
opportunity to attain the knowledge and skills funda- 
mental to full and informed participation in society. 
The curriculum is designed to ensure that the student 
achieves mastery of a major field of study while al- 
lowing her maximum freedom in the planning and 
practice of her own education. 

Not only is the student free to choose among vari- 
ous courses and disciplines, she is also able to learn 
in a variety of ways. Field work, tutorials, indepen- 
dent research and foreign study supplement tradi- 
tional classroom lectures and discussions. 

This freedom of choice is accompanied by a high 
measure of responsibility for the individual student. 
In arranging her own program of studies with the 
help of faculty, she must constantly reflect upon and 
evaluate her academic endeavors in the light of the 
policies and requirements stated in this catalogue. 



Degrees Offered 

Newton College offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and 
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees. In addition, 
graduate credit is given for experienced teachers for 
advanced study in selected areas offered by the 
Physical Science Group. 



Requirements for the Bachelor Degree 

To earn a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
degree, a student must complete 32 units of aca- 
demic work and maintain a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0. 

Because communication is essential to success in 
all areas of education, entering students are required 
to satisfy the College requirement in Communica- 
tions. Most students take Communications (Cm 
101-102), offered by the Division of Humanities. 

Students who enter the College with English Ad- 
vanced Placement scores of 3 or above may consider 
the requirement satisfied. Two units are awarded to 
students with Advanced Placement scores of 4 or 5. 

Transfer students must also demonstrate profi- 
ciency in Communications. If transfer students have 
not taken a course equivalent to Cm 101-102, they 
may take the proficiency examination or Cm 101- 
102. 

Each student must elect a major field and meet 
the requirements established by that Department. In 
all other aspects of the curriculum, the student is 
free to choose her own courses, in consultation with 
faculty advisors. 

Freshman-Sophomore Program 

The Freshman-Sophomore Program is designed to 
assist students in the transition from high school to 



21 



college and to provide the individual student with a 
broad educational base for her more specialized 
study in the liberal arts. This program meets the 
various needs of underclassmen through Advisory 
Groups, Liberal Education courses and Communica- 
tions courses. 

Advisory Groups aim to help each student under- 
stand the nature of a liberal education. To this end, 
all freshmen participate in these groups with an aca- 
demic advisor in order to: 

1. discuss varying views on the nature of a liberal 
education; 

2. help integrate their learning experiences as 
they discuss and come to understand the pur- 
pose of such an education; 

3. help plan their own educational programs at 
the undergraduate level and beyond; 

4. insure that they take an appropriate number 
of Liberal Education courses to secure a broad 
educational base; 

5. introduce them to the educational resources at 
Newton College and in the Boston area. 

During the first semester, the Advisory Groups meet 
weekly. During both semesters, students meet with 
the advisor individually as needed, or at least 
monthly. 

An Advisory Group is composed of 10-12 fresh- 
man students under the direction of a faculty member 
who has primary responsibility for the advising. To 
each group an alternate advisor is assigned who oc- 
casionally attends the group meetings and is avail- 
able to members of the group for consultation. 

The Liberal Education courses are devised to pro- 
vide all students with a broad intellectual context for 
their more specialized study. Through them, the stu- 
dent comes to understand herself and her environ- 
ment and to learn how to evaluate and appreciate. 



morally and aesthetically, what she is, what she en- 
counters and what she wishes to become. These 
courses are clearly intended to acquaint students 
with how scholars in each area of knowledge think 
and what methods they employ. In them, students 
concentrate on thinking about, rather than merely 
collecting, facts. 

Liberal Education courses are taken in the stu- 
dents' first and second years. They should not be 
chosen haphazardly, but in consultation with faculty 
advisors so that narrow specialization is avoided and 
the students' programs form a broad and integrated 
whole. 

The Communications course aims to improve and 
develop students' ability to think clearly and logically 
and to express themselves precisely, fluently, cor- 
rectly and effectively in speech and in writing. This 
course (Cm 101-102), required for all freshmen, 
allows students and faculty in each section to em- 
phasize the needs of the group. Library and research 
skills are also included, and class discussion so con- 
ducted that students acquire skills in effective oral 
communication. 

The Major 

Each student must satisfy the requirements of a 
major field. The major fields of study offered at 
Newton College are the following: 

American Studies Liberal Studies 

Art History Philosophy 

Art Studio Political Science 

Biology Psychology 

Chemistry Religion 

Economics Romance Languages 

English Science 

French Sociology 

History Urban Studies 



22 



Interdisciplinary Majors 

Several of the major fields of study are interdisci- 
plinary by nature. 

American Studies affords the student the possi- 
bility of concentrating on the political, social and 
cultural history of the United States by selecting 
courses dealing with American art, government, phi- 
losophy, religion, literature, music, economics and 
history. 

Urban Studies draws upon the several social sci- 
ences and history to provide the student with a multi- 
disciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics 
of urban change. 

Romance Languages allows the student to study 
two of the romance languages taught at Newton Col- 
lege — French, Italian, and Spanish. 

A Science major usually involves work in biology, 
chemistry, physics and mathematics while allowing 
enough flexibility to permit the student to concen- 
trate on one of several science specialties. 

Liberal Studies allows each selected student to de- 
velop her own curriculum under the guidance of one 
or more faculty members. 

Double Majors 

With the agreement of the respective Department 
Chairmen, it is possible for a student to major in two 
fields of study. 

The Minor 

Although not required for graduation, minors are 
offered by most departments as a complement to a 
student's major field of study. In addition, minors 
are available in the following programs: 

Classics Education Music 

Drama Mathematics Physics 



Resource Centers 

LIBRARY 

Adjacent to the Administration and classroom build- 
ing is the Kenny-Cottle Library, which, with a collec- 
tion of over 100,000 volumes, including microforms 
provides the resources needed to support the cur 
riculum. The library currently receives nearly 900 
periodicals. Through the interlibrary loan service 
operating with most of the university and specia 
libraries of the Boston area, nearly all book and peri 
odical requests can be fulfilled. 

Except for the reference area and Periodical Room 
all library materials are centrally located on four 
floors of open stacks. Study carrels and tables pro 
vide seating space for 450 library users. 

Stereo record players and cassette decks are built 
into tables on the first floor for use with headsets. 
And international band short wave radio receiving 
station is available here for students interested in 
foreign language training or international affairs. Ad- 
ditional stereo record decks are on carrels in the Peri- 
odicals Room in the basement of the building. A wide 
range of audiovisual machines is available for class- 
room use or student group activities, along with films, 
slides, videotapes and audiocassettes. 

The College archive collection housed in the li- 
brary includes student publications as well as admin- 
istrative and academic records. In addition, there is 
a collection of materials on the Society of the Sacred 
Heart and its involvement in the College. A collec- 
tion of manuscript material relating to the social and 
cultural life of the Catholic community in Boston is 
available for research. 



The Office of Career Counseling 

The Office of Career Counseling aids students in their 



23 



plans for post-graduate work and study. It provides 
Individual assistance in writing resumes and in pre- 
paring for interviews. It invites to campus represent- 
atives from various organizations, companies and 
graduate schools to discuss with students opportuni- 
ties in specific fields. 

The Office maintains graduate school bulletins as 
well as resource material on careers. Students are 
encouraged to utilize the resources of the Office 
throughout their four years at Newton. The Office is 
the official repository for all college placement 
records of current students and alumnae. 

Academic Policies 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Students who enter Newton College with an English 
Advanced Placement score of 3 are exempt from 
Communications (Cm 101-102). Two units are 
awarded to students with English Advanced Place- 
ment scores of 4 or 5. In other subject areas, a stu- 
dent will receive Advanced Placement and/or credit 
at the recommendation of the department, subject 
to the approval of the Academic Dean. The maximum 
accepted for Advanced Placement is 2 units. 

CREDIT FOR OTHER ACADEMIC WORK 
For a matriculated Newton College student, 8 units 
is the maximum to be accepted by Newton College 
for academic study abroad or study at another col- 
lege in the United States. 

Study at another institution requires prior approval 
by the Department Chairman and the Office of the 
Academic Dean. Credit will be transferred from any 
accredited college or university for a course in which 
the student has received a grade of C or above, if 
prior approval has been granted. A freshman who 
received C or above in a college course before enter- 



ing Newton should petition the Office of the Academic 
Dean for credit during the first semester of her fresh- 
man year. 

STUDY ABROAD 

A student seeking to enroll in a study abroad pro- 
gram must discuss her plans well in advance with 
the Office of the Academic Dean. She must obtain a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0; she must re- 
ceive the approval of her Department Chairman and 
the Office of the Academic Dean. 

Priority will be given to students who are partici- 
pating in Newton College programs. There are a 
limited number of additional openings for language 
majors and other students for whom study abroad 
would be an integral part of their academic program. 

SEMESTER SCHEDULE 

The single unit is generally equivalent to a one se- 
mester course but some courses are designated a 
half unit, others a double unit. (A unit equals 4 credit 
hours.) The normal course load is four units per se- 
mester unless the student is an honor student (6+ 
cumuiative average), is pursuing a major program 
requiring more than eight upper division units and 
two units in prerequisites, or is allowed to take addi- 
tional units at the discretion of the Academic Dean. 
In these cases, the student may take a maximum of 
five units per semester. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND READING COURSES 
Many departments of the College allow students each 
semester to take one course of individual study di- 
rected by a member of the faculty. Under this pro- 
gram an eligible student (second semester freshman 
or upperclassman) may undertake a research project 
or a program of reading in a particular field. The 
results of this work will normally be presented in a 
final report or examination. To be eligible for credit 



24 



in such a course, a student must present to the Di- 
rector of the appropriate Division by the Wednesday 
before registration a written detailed description of 
the course, with signatures of approval of her instruc- 
tor and Department Chairman. Only after she has 
received the approval of the Division Director may 
she register for such a course. Normally, a student 
may take one such course per semester for a maxi- 
mum of one unit. 

Independent study forms may be obtained in the 
Registrar's Office. 

In order for a grade to be officially registered, a 
Grade and Written Evaluation form must be received 
by the Registrar. Approval is not given for a reading 




course or independent study in a subject matter han- 
dled in a regular course. 

CROSS-REGISTRATION 

Cross-registration is arranged with Boston College 
during the Fall and Spring semesters. Courses taken 
at Boston College are part of the student's Newton 
course load. A course offered at Newton may not be 
taVen at Boston College. Generally, a student may 
take one course per semester under this plan. Credit 
will be transferred only with the prior approval of the 
Office of the Academic Dean and with the approval of 
the Department Chairman if the course counts as 
upper division in a major field. 

AUDITING 

Full-time students may, without charge, register to 
audit one course per semester with the permission 
of the professor. The decision to audit a course 
rather than to take it for credit must be made at the 
time of registration. A change from audit to credit 
or vice-versa may not be effected after the close of 
the registration period. Part-time students who wish 
to audit a course will be subject to an audit fee. 

REGISTRATION 

Students should register on the registration dates 
announced in the College calendar. Permission of 
the Registrar must be secured for registration on 
dates other than those assigned. No credit will be 
given for any courses for which the student is not 
duly registered and which is not officially scheduled. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE 
After registration, a student may not withdraw from 
a course without prior consultation with and approval 
from the faculty member teaching the course. The 
deadline for withdrawal is the tenth calendar week 
of the semester. 

To withdraw from a course a student must secure 



25 



a withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, have 
the form signed by the approving faculty member, 
submit the signed form to the Assistant to the Aca- 
demic Dean for her signature of approval and, finally, 
submit the completed form to the Registrar's Office. 

Withdrawals will appear on the student's record 
as W/P (Withdrawal-Passing) or W/F (Withdrawal- 
Failing). 

There is a $10 fee for dropping a course after the 
registration period. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The grading system is as follows: 



member, in writing, to the Dean, giving full reasons 
for the requested change, not later than June 28, 
1974. 







Grade Point 




Grade 


Description 


Equivalents 


Quality Points 


A 


Outstanding 


4.00 


Grade 


A- 


Superior 


3.75 


points 


B+ 


Very Good 


3.50 


times the 


B 


Good 


3.00 


number 


B- 


Above Average 


2.75 


of 


c+] 




2.50 


semester 


c . 


Adequate 


2.00 


hours 


c- 




1.75 




D 


Less Than Adequate 1.00 




F 


Inadequate 


0.00 





The semester average is found by dividing the sum 
of the quality points by the number of semester hours 
taken. The cumulative average is the average of the 
semester grade point averages to date. The passing 
cumulative average and the passing semester average 
are both 2.0. 

Once a final grade is reported to the Office of the 
Registrar, it cannot be changed without the approval 
of the Academic Dean. First semester grade change 
requests must be made by the faculty member, in 
writing, to the Dean, giving full reasons for the re- 
quested change, not later than ten days after the 
beginning of the second semester. Second semester 
grade change requests must be made by the faculty 



HONORS 

3.5 
3.7 
3.9 



(Computed on each (Computed on the 



semester's work 
taken alone) 
Dean's List 

Honor List 

High Honors 



cumulative average) 

Cum Laude at 
Graduation 
Magna Cum Laude 
at Graduation 
Summa Cum Laude 
at Graduation 



A portfolio of recommendations and evaluations of 
each student majoring in a field will be kept in the 
Department and will be used in interpreting the stu- 
dent's record. 

PASS/ FAIL COURSES 

Second semester freshmen and upperclassmen may 
take courses on a Pass/Fail basis up to the number 
of six units for the 31/2 years. This option does not 
apply to courses to be used for upper division credit 
in the major field unless the Department so specifies. 
The decision to take a course Pass/ Fail rather than 
for a letter grade must be made at the time of regis- 
tration. A change from Pass/ Fail to a letter grade or 
vice versa may not be effected after the close of the 
registration period. 

INCOMPLETE GRADES 

The grade "Incomplete" can only be given with the 
written approval of the Office of the Academic Dean. 
Such approval must be gained before the beginning 
of the examination period and will be given only in 
the cases of illness or real emergency. Approved 
"Incompletes" will include the date by which the 
work will be completed. 



26 





r^ 








LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

A student who wishes to take a leave of absence 
should discuss her plans well in advance with the 
Office of the Academic Dean. She should submit in 
writing her request for leave of absence. Appropriate 
request forms may be obtained in the Registrar's 
Office. A student who desires to study at an accred- 
ited college or university while she is on leave of 
absence must receive the prior approval of her De- 
partment Chairman for courses which may count as 
upper division work In her major field and the ap- 
proval of the Office of the Academic Dean. Courses 
not in the student's major field only need the ap- 
proval of the Office of the Academic Dean. The Office 
of the Registrar must be notified by the student, in 
writing, that she will be on leave. 

WITHDRAWAL 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the College 
must make application to the Academic Dean and 
Registrar for permission to withdraw in good stand- 
ing. A student whose cumulative average is below 
2.0 is on academic probation and is not considered 
to be in good standing. A student on disciplinary pro- 
bation is also not considered to be in good standing. 
Any student whose cumulative average falls below 
2.0 is subject to being asked to withdraw from the 
College. The College may request withdrawal of any 
student whose behavior is not in accord with the 
standard required by the College. All withdrawals 
must be made officially through the Offices of the 
Academic Dean, the Dean of Students, the Business 
Manager and the Registrar. Appropriate request 
forms may be obtained in the Registrar's Office. 

READMISSION 

Any student in good standing who has withdrawn 
from Newton College may be readmitted under the 
conditions that apply to transfer students. 



27 



Courses of Instruction 



The Divisional Structure 

For intellectual and administrative purposes, aca- 
demic departments and programs are grouped into 
larger Divisions. 

The Divisions are: 

1. Division of Fine Arts 

2. Division of Humanities 

3. Division of Science and Mathematics 

4. Division of Social Sciences and Religion 

5. Division of Special Programs 



Course Listing Notation 

In all departments courses are arranged according 



to the following numbering system: 

lOO's refer to introduction to the discipline and to 
Liberal Education courses; 

200's include prerequisites to the major beyond the 
introductory course and general electives for 
the non-major; 

300's include more advanced courses in the disci- 
pline and assume an appropriate background 
on the part of each student; specific prerequi- 
sites or permission of the instructor may be 
designated; 

400's are ordinarily reserved for the advanced stu- 
dent majors or minors; they include seminars 
and projects designed as integrative academic 
experiences for the senior majors and minors. 

Each course is given a three digit number. The 
first digit indicates the course level (100, 200, 300 
or 400) as explained in the previous paragraph. The 
last digit indicates the semester in which the course 
is offered — an odd number if fall semester, and an 
even number if spring semester. 

Frequently a course is shown with two numbers. 
If the two numbers are separated by a dash (AS 101- 
102), the course continues throughout two semes- 
ters. A grade is given at the end of each semester. 
If the two numbers are separated by a comma (PS 
201, 202), the same one semester course is repeated 
in each of the two semesters. 

Following the course title appears the number of 
units associated with the course. One unit is equiva- 
lent to 4 credits; 1/2 unit to 2 credits. 

The name of the course instructor and the class 
meeting times are part of the semester course 
schedule available from the Office of the Registrar. 
Such information is not, therefore, included in the 
catalogue. 



28 



Division of Fine Arts 



Art History 
Art Studio 
Drama 
Music 



The Division of Fine Arts offers majors In Art History and 
Art Studio. It offers minors in the same Departments and In 
the Programs of Drama and Music. 

The Division of Fine Arts offers the following courses in 
Liberal Education: 

LE 141-142 The Creative Process in the Visual Arts 

1-1 (unit) Offered 1974-75 
LE 143 Art Fundamentals 1 (unit) 

LE 144 Design Fundamentals 1 (unit) 

LE 145-146 Introduction to Music 1-1 (unit) 



ART 

The Art Department addresses itself to the student 
artist and to the student interested in art. It is not a 
professional art school, but it does train students to 
be competent in their field and capable of pursuing 
it professionally. 

The intellectual background of a liberal arts col- 
lege provides the student with the opportunity to test 
her ideas and interests on a broad base. The Art De- 
partment benefits from the stimulation of its liberal 
arts surroundings. At the same time, it seeks to en- 
rich the entire College community by offering an 
intense and excellent program in visual expression 
and visual communication. Students are encouraged 
to create freely, to comment and to criticize. No one 
bias in art studio or art historical thinking predomi- 
nates. The faculty represents a variety of views and 
approaches and encourages the student to think and 
create independently. 

Students concentrate either in Art Studio or in Art 
History. Both major fields are taught in close coop- 
eration. Studio majors can complement their work 
with historical studies and an awareness of contem- 
porary critical trends. Art History majors are en- 



29 



couraged to take Studio courses which allow them to 
understand the experiences of artists by working with 
their materials and so learning the possibilities and 
limitations of the different media. 

Most Art courses are given in the Putnam Art 
Center, where art on exhibit and art in process con- 
tribute to an environment which stimulates creativity. 

ART HISTORY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Students majoring in the History of Art must take AR 101- 
102, AR 201-202; 8 upper division courses in tiie area of 
Art History including AR 401, completed with a grade of 
C or better and a satisfactory Senior Project. It is recom- 
mended that students acquire a sufficient language facility 
to be able to do serious research in German, French or 
Italian. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
The Art Department offers a minor in the History of Art for 
those students who complete a minimum of 5 courses in the 
department distributed as follows. AR 101-102 and at least 
two semesters of upper division Art History courses. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

LE 141-142 The Creative Process in the Visual Arts 

1-1 (unit) 
An analysis of the creative process as evidenced in the move- 
ments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the 
point of view of their formal, historical, social and symbolic 
significance. Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 101 History of Art 1 (unit) 
Prehistoric through Medieval; survey with readings in art 
history. 

Ar 102 History of Art 1 (unit) 
Renaissance through Modern; survey with readings in art 
history. 

Ar 201-202 Seminar in Studio Methods y2-V2 (unit) 
Ancient and "Old Master" techniques. Required for Art His- 
tory majors, open to others. Pass/Fail. Attendance re- 
quired. Offered 1974-75. 



Ar 301 Prehistoric Art 1 (unit) 
A study of art and culture from the Paleolithic through the 
Neolithic. Major emphasis on the case sanctuaries with 
their problems of dating and interpretation. Seminar with 
workshop on problems in aesthetics and techniques related 
to the study of prehistoric art; major emphasis on the neo- 
lithic crafts. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 313 Islamic Art 1 (unit) 
A study of the art and culture of Islam. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 314 Buddhist Sculpture in India, China and Japan 

1 (unit) 
The development of the Buddhist image from its origins in 
India. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 316 Greek Art 1 (unit) 
A study of Greek art primarily within the context of the de- 
velopment of cult centers and cities. Seminar and workshop. 

Ar 321 Medieval Architecture 1 (unit) 
The development of building types and the evolution of style 
from late antiquity through the High Gothic. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 322 Medieval Painting, Sculpture and Decorative Art 

1 (unit) 
The development of style and iconography from the early 
Middle Ages through the High Gothic. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 331 Early Renaissance Painting and Sculpture 

1 (unit) 
Painting and Sculpture of the fourteenth and fifteenth cen- 
turies in Italy, concentrating on the artistic centers of Flor- 
ence, Siena and Venice. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 332 High Renaissance Painting and Sculpture 

1 (unit) 
Painting and sculpture of the sixteenth century. The course 
will concentrate on the High Renaissance of Rome and Flor- 



30 



ence, the concept and visual characteristics of Mannerist art, 
and the proto-Baroque styles of northern Italy. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 335 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture 

1 (unit) 
The Renaissance, Mannerist and Baroque styles of the fif- 
teenth through the mid-eighteenth centuries, with particular 
emphasis on Italy. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 341 Seminar in Baroque Studies 1 (unit) 
The Three Romes, the development of Rome through clas- 
sical, papal and modern periods: how the projects of one are 
affected by the structures of the previous. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 344 Architecture from 1750 to the Present 1 (unit) 
The sources and evolution of modern architecture. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 355 Nineteenth Century Art 1 (unit) 
Impressionism and Post-Impressionism and their origins in 
the earlier nineteenth century. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 357 Art 1900 to 1940 1 (unit) 
Discussion of major art movements of the early twentieth 
century with emphasis on Cubism, Fauvism, Expressionism, 
Dadaism and Surrealism. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 358 Contemporary Art 1 (unit) 
Art from 1940 to the present, concentrating on art of the 
United States. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 376 Seminar on the City of Boston 1 (unit) 
Eighteenth century Boston art and architecture to present 
urban renewals. Lecture and field trips. Limited to 12 to 15 
students. By permission only. Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 379 American Art Prior to the Civil War 1 (unit) 
Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 
permission of the instructor. 



Ar 380 American Art from 1865 through the Present 

1 (unit) 
Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 
permission of the instructor. 

Ar 381-382 Museum Seminar in American Art 

1/2-1/2 (unit) 
The study of American painting, furniture and silver of the 
18th and 19th centuries in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 
Limited to 12 to 15 students. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 383-384 Philosophy of Art 1-1 (unit) 
An introduction to theories of art and beauty in both eastern 
and western culture. An analysis of the creative act as it 
relates to aesthetics. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

Ar 387-388 Art as Symbol 1 (unit) 
A study of the symbol, primarily through Jung's archetypes, 
as it relates to art thematically, formally, etc.: the totality, 
the Great Mother; polarities, feminine and masculine, con- 
stancy and change; the hero; transformation. Seminar with 
workshop on the use of art, music, dance, theater, ritual, 
etc. to understand and experience the dynamics of symbols. 

Prerequisite: Ar 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Ar 401 Seminar in Methods and Criticism 1 (unit) 
An analysis of different approaches to art (the formal, the 
iconographical and the political) and a discussion of the 
bases for historical and modern criticism. Required of Art 
History majors; open to juniors and seniors in the depart- 
ment and to others who have completed at least one semes- 
ter of Art History beyond the survey course. 

Ar 497, 498 Independent Study in the History of Art 

1/2-1. V2-I (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a detailed description of the 
course requirements as agreed to by the instructor directing 
the study and as approved by the Chairman and Division 
Director. The student must successfully carry through the 
project as outlined. If these conditions are satisfied, the 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study course should be carried in any one semes- 
ter. (Please refer to policy on independent study.) 



31 



Ar 499 Senior Project 1 (unit) 
Required of all Art History majors. 

ART STUDIO 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Students majoring in Art Studio must take AS 101-102, Ar 
101-102; 8 upper division Studio courses, completed with 
a grade of C or better, including a satisfactory Senior Project. 
Graduating majors should have a portfolio of their best work. 

All Art Studio majors are required to present their work 
at the end of each semester to a Review Board of Art faculty 
members for comments, criticism and direction. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
The Art Department offers a minor in Art Studio for those 
students who complete a minimum of 5 courses in Art Studio 
with a grade of C or better, distributed as follows: 2 semes- 
ters of Introductory Studio and 3 semester courses of which 
at least 2 should be upper division or 5 semesters of studio 
work of which at least 3 should be in the same area of art. 
Studio minors may participate in regular Review Boards and 
their complete portfolio will be reviewed by the Art faculty 
during their last semester at Newton. Approval of the port- 
folio is essential to the granting of the minor. 

STUDIO FEES 
Studio fees are charged for all Studio courses; the fee for 
each course is listed on the course schedule. These fees do 
not cover ail the expenses the students incur, but they buy 
such supplies as the Department must provide for each 
class. Studio fees apply to all persons enrolled in Studio 
courses. 

All Studio courses are subject to limited enrollment. 
The introductory Studio course (101a, 101b; 102a, 102b) 
consists of a series of interrelated classes designed to give 
the student acquaintance with various skills, techniques, 
media and viewpoints; this course is a prerequisite for most 
other courses in the Department. Sections a and b of each 
semester must be taken simultaneously. 

LE 143 Art Fundamentals 1 (unit) 
A seminar-workshop to introduce the student with little art 
background to a variety of art experiences. Orientation is 
towards an understanding of problems posed by contem- 
porary art, but historical solutions to similar problems will 
also be taken into account. 



LE 144 Design Fundamentals 1 (unit) 
Use of basketry, weaving, macrame and related skills to 
learn and experiment with basic design principles. Primarily 
for students with little art background. 

AS 101a Foundations of Studio Art: Drawing 

1/2 (unit) 
Freehand drawing: a direct interpretation of visual reality, 
natural as well as made, employing various media; investiga- 
tion of experimental techniques and approaches to drawing. 

AS 101b Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design 

1/2 (unit) 
Design research; a studio course to train the student to 
visualize and represent the illusion of form, action, rhythm, 
structure and space, using line, tone, texture, as well as 
images, employing traditional media as well as experimenta- 
tion with new materials. 

AS 102a Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design 

1/2 (unit) 
Design research; a workshop course to train the student to 
visualize in space and to develop a sensitivity to form, struc- 
ture and balance, using ordinary materials in the forming 
process, coordinating mind, eye and hand with reference to 
the order of nature. 

AS 102b Foundations of Studio Art: Painting 

Vz (unit) 
A basic study of problems concerned with volume, texture, 
color and space. Required readings. Oil. 

AS 181 Color 1 (unit) 
An inquiry into the construction and design of color as a 
force. A combination of the study of color theorists and the 
studio use of collage and pigment. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 207-208 Figure Drawing I V2-V2 (unit) 
Studies from the model. Watercolor, ink, conte, charcoal, 
pencil and mixed media; composition and anatomy. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 213 Basic Oil, Acrylic and Gouache Techniques 

V2 (unit) 
Modeling and defining forms in an opaque medium. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 



32 



AS 217-218 Developmental Painting I 1-1 (unit) 
An intermediate painting course designed to allow the stu- 
dent to program a series of works that are relevant to the 
individual. Oil or acrylic. A second semester option study 
in portraiture is offered. Charcoal, pastel and oil. 

Prerequisite: AS 102b 

AS 231-232 Sculpture I 1-1 (unit) 
Studies in clay of the human head and figure from the living 
model. Emphasis on careful observation of structure and 
sensitivity to compositional elements. A freer approach is 
encouraged in work done outside class. 

AS 245-246 Environmental Design I 1-1 (unit) 
Studio workshop course to train the student to see man as 
center and a measure of his environment: acquisition of tech- 
niques to represent and communicate by means of projection 
drawing, such as orthographic, isometric and perspective 
drawing, as well as the use of models. An introduction to 
the design process as it relates to programming; criteria to 
solve specific environmental theoretical problems. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102. 

AS 251-252 Ceramics: Hand Building 1-1 (unit) 
The basic fundamentals of ceramics for self expression. The 
course will be conducted through informal talks and demon- 
strations including orientation and exploration of the possi- 
bilities within the medium of clay and glaze, technical back- 
ground, history and experience in all the techniques of hand- 
building. 

This course is a prerequisite for students planning a major 
ceramics concentration. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102. 

AS 255-255 Weaving I 1-1 (unit) 
An introduction to weaving as a medium of contemporary 
art. Exploration of weaving techniques used in the creation 
of accessories and wall hangings. Experimentation with pat- 
tern drafts, tapestry weaves and different types of materials. 
With permission of the instructor. 

AS 261-262 Printmaking I V2-V2 (unit) 
Relief and stencil printing. A course in printing from raised 
surfaces and stencil templates. Use of wood, masonite and 
plastic: inking, printing and registration methods. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 



AS 263-264 Etching 1-1 (unit) 
Intaglio methods of printing with emphasis on etching. Study 
of the different effects produced by a variety of inks, papers, 
grounds, etc. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 271-272 Photograph I 1-1 (unit) 
The technique of photographic seeing, tone, texture and 
lighting including developing and printing. Emphasis will be 
on print quality and directness of statement, as explored 
through weekly assignments and their critique. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 277-278 Color Photography 1-1 (unit) 
An exploration of negative and positive color materials and 
their creative use. The course will include a survey of com- 
mercial color applications, dye transfer, duotone and color 
separation but will be concerned primarily with the produc- 
tion of consistent effective color transparencies and their 
uses. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102, AS 271-272 or permission of 
the instructor. Offered 1974-75. 

AS 303 Serigraphy I 1 (unit) 
The techniques of screen construction, stencil making and 
multiple color printing. Required readings. 

Prerequisites: AS 101-102 and AS 181 (may be taken 
simultaneously). 

AS 304 Serigraphy II 1 (unit) 
Utilization of technique; problems concerning fabric printing, 
fine art and commercial applications. Required readings. 

Prerequisite: AS 303. 

AS 307-308 Figure Drawing II V2-V2 (unit) 
Work in dry brush with emphasis on the modeling of the 
musculature and the forms of the human body. 

Prerequisites: AS 101-102, and a minimum of one se- 
mester of AS 207-208. 

AS 310 Figure Painting Va (unit) 
Working from life model in oil and acrylic paints. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 313-314 Tutorial in Stage Design and Lighting 

1-1 (unit) 
Given in conjunction with the Drama Department; study, de- 
sign and actual building of sets for the semester play (Dr 
201-202), presenting theatrical ideas through scene design 



33 



and lighting. Limited to 5 students, by permission only. 

AS 317-318 Developmental Painting II 1-1 (unit) 
A studio course designed to allow the student to program a 
series of works that are relevant to the individual. The in- 
tention of this study is to develop the capacity for arriving 
at individual solutions. Oil, acrylic or mixed media. 

Prerequisite: AS 217-218 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 321 Structural Drawing 1 (unit) 
Freehand rendering of objects in a classical academic tech- 
nique. Grounding in linear perspective, modeling, aerial per- 
spective. Silverpoint, graphite, tone drawing. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 322 Compositional Drawing 1 (unit) 
Freer use of skills developed in Structural Drawing in more 
complex themes. Graphite, pen and ink, brush and ink. 

Prerequisite: AS 321 or the submission of a portfolio. 

AS 331-332 Sculpture II 1-1 (unit) 
Advanced work in one area of sculpture. 
Prerequisite: AS 231-232. 

AS 334 Tutorial in Compositional Drawing 1 (unit) 
Emphasis on emotional, intuitive and imaginative approaches 
to drawing. Both experimentation and concentration on a 
personal idiom will be encouraged. Group and individual 
discussions. One meeting a week. 

Prerequisite: AS 322 or the submission of a portfolio. 

AS 343-344 Tutorial in Advanced Design 1-1 (unit) 
Workshop course as a continuation of design research, two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional, on a more advanced 
level, with special emphasis on scale development from 
sketch to environmental realization at larger or human scale. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102; limited to 10 students, by per- 
mission only. 

AS 345-346 Environmental Design II 1-1 (unit) 
A continuation of workshop course Environmental Design I, 
applying knowledge in the solving of problems and introduc- 
ing students to various aspects of architecture and planning 
as tools for forming man's physical environment. 

Prerequisite: AS 245-246. 

AS 351-352 Ceramics II 1-1 (unit) 
An investigative approach to the use of clay and glaze with 
demonstrations and practice of all working processes, i.e.. 



throwing techniques, hand and slab, forming, glaze and slip 
application and production and firing methods. 
Prerequisite: AS 251-252. 

AS 353-354 Ceramics: Wheel Throwing 1-1 (unit) 
Fundamentals of throwing on the potter's wheel. Emphasis 
is placed on the development of throwing skills, not the 
acquisition of objects. 

Specific projects are given which assist the student to de- 
velop throwing skills at an advanced level. Emphasis is 
placed on design techniques, professionalism of craftsman- 
ship and visual maturity. 

Prerequisite: AS 251-252. 

AS 355-356 Weaving M 1-1 (unit) 
Emphasis on creation of original designs in tapestry weaves, 
multiple harness weaves and three-dimensional weaving. 

Prerequisite: AS 255-256. 

AS 361-362 Printmaking II 1-1 (unit) 
An advanced workshop in intaglio printmaking with particular 
attention given to the problems of color printing. The course 
emphasizes development of flexibility in applying personal 
aesthetic values to a diversified technical format. 

Prerequisite: AS 261-262 or AS 263-264 and permission 
of the instructor. 

AS 371-372 Photography II 1-1 (unit) 
Creative uses of photographic techniques and processes. A 
continued investigation of the medium, including the full 
range of camera and darkroom equipment. 

Prerequisite: AS 271-272 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 373-374 Tutorial in Advanced Photography 

1-1 (unit) 
Assignments in various fields of traditional subject matter 
(architecture, portraiture, nature, etc.) are given, leading to 
the production of a portfolio and exhibition. 
Prerequisite: AS 271-272 and AS 371-372. 

AS 377-378 Filmmaking I 1-1 (unit) 
An introduction to filmmaking, including an historical and 
technical review of the development of the motion picture. 
Emphasis will be on film production with super-8 equipment. 
Assignments in hand-drawn film, animation and sound will 
be included. Second semester will include sound and film 
editing. 

Prerequisite: AS 101-102 or permission of the instructor. 



34 



AS 381-382 Tutorial in Space Problems 1-1 (unit) 
Space problems solved, imaginative as well as specific; ex- 
hibition, theatrical and monumental, using models and actual 
space where possible. Limited to two or three seniors, by 
permission only. 

AS 385, 386 Independent Work in Studio Art 

1,1 (unit) 
(Please see policy on independent study.) 

AS 402 Senior Semester 4 (units) 
Senior Art Studio majors who have a good academic record 
and have achieved a high degree of competence in some area 
of art while having an appropriate breadth of exposure may 
request to work independently of courses during their last 
semester at Newton, under the direction of members of the 
Art faculty. Students interested in this Senior Semester must 
submit a written proposal regarding their plans to the Chair- 
man of the Department before November 15. Proposals are 
reviewed together with the students' portfolios by the Art 
faculty, who recommend to the Dean's Office for approval. 

The Senior Semester is intended only for the student who 
has no need of courses to continue her development. Her 
work is directed and reviewed by a board of Art faculty; it 
includes the Senior Project and may fulfill part of the de- 
partmental upper-division requirement. Students are graded 
Pass/Fail/Honors and a description of the Senior Semester 
and an evaluation of it is attached to the student's tran- 
script. 

Limited to one or two students, by permission only. 

AS 485, 486 Advanced Independent Work in Studio Art 

1,1 (unit) 

AS 499 Senior Project 1 (unit) 
Required of all Art Studio majors. 

The following courses will be offered on a contingency basis 
at a time convenient for Continuing Studies students. They 
carry normal academic credit and may serve as prerequisites 
to other courses in the Department. 

AS 101a Foundation of Studio Art: Drawing V2 (unit) 
A foundation drawing course designed to familiarize students 
with the inherent qualities of various media and the proce- 
dures through which drawing may be understood as a per- 
ceptual language. Class problems are intended to develop 
intelligent observational skills as a condition of interpretive 
drawing. 



AS 101b Introduction to Two-Dlmensional Design 

1/2 (unit) 
Basic design considerations — placement, tension, positive 
and negative space, depth, motion and elementary color 
considerations in a single plane. This design course is ap- 
propriate for those interested in painting, printmaking and 
photography. The materials used are simple and inexpensive 
and there are no prerequisites. Emphasis is on design as a 
process. 

AS 102a Introduction to Three-Dlmensional Design in 
Ceramics V2 (unit) 
The emphasis of this course is on training the student to 
visualize in space and to develop a sensitivity to form and 
design. The course will be conducted through informal talks 
and demonstrations including orientation and exploration of 
the possibilities within the medium of clay and glaze, tech- 
nical background and experience in all the techniques of 
hand building. 

AS 102b Foundation of Studio Art: Painting V2 (unit) 
A basic study of problems concerned with volume, texture, 
color and space. 



DRAMA 

The Drama Program offers a knowledge of the arts of the 
theatre. Courses are offered in dramatic history and litera- 
ture and in skills for performance and production. Two plays 
are produced and presented each year on campus. In addi- 
tion, students are encouraged to attend plays and readings 
presented on neighboring campuses and in the Boston area. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The Drama Program offers a minor to those students who 
complete a minimum of 5 courses in the program, with a 
grade of C or better, distributed as follows: DR 201-202 and 
three other courses in the program. 

Dr 101-102 Introduction to Theatre 1-1 (unit) 
Basic course in fundamentals of theatre: terminology, stage- 
craft, set building, lighting, makeup and kinds of theatres. 
Duties of stage-managing; how the director functions; how 
to "hold book." Included, in general areas, will be the ap- 



35 



plication of the above knowledge to film and television. 
Practical work on production crews. 

Dr 181-182 History of the Theatre 1-1 (unit) 
From the Greeks to restoration, and from the eighteenth cen- 
tury to modern; a lecture course correlating theatrical and 
dramatic history, studying plays, playwrights, actors, audi- 
ences and physical theatres. Offered 1974-75. 

Dr 201-202 Drama Production V2-V^ (unit) 
An intensive 8-week involvement (each semester) in several 
areas of play production during actual rehearsal of the Fall 
and/or Spring shows. Students may participate in acting, 
stage managing, props or makeup and, with the exception of 
the actors, would rotate these responsibilities during the re- 
hearsal period. A minimum of 9 to 12 hours a week, pri- 
marily at night, would be expected in order to fulfill course 
requirements. 

Dr 205 Greek and Roman Theatre 1 (unit) 
Reading of selected plays, both tragedy and comedy; study 
of play production in antiquity: theatres, stage equipment, 
costumes, masks, music, dance. Probable origins and de- 
velopment of comedy and tragedy. Offered 1974—75. 

En 213 Introduction to Drama 1 (unit) 
Several modern plays compared with plays of earlier periods 
in order to explore the historical and theatrical relations 
between them. 

Dr 300 The Current Theatre in Boston 1 (unit) 
A study of selected plays currently being produced in Boston: 
the course will involve not only intensive study of these plays 
as dramatic literature, but also various aspects of their pro- 
duction and an analysis of critical reviews. Offered 1974-75. 

Dr 301-302 Drama Production for Advanced Students 

1/2-1/2 (unit) 
Given in conjunction with DR 201-202; advanced students 
will be expected to participate fully in the production of the 
Fall and/or Spring plays and to do research and present a 
paper on some related aspect of the play produced. By per- 
mission only. 

Sp 304 Spanish Theatre of the Twentieth Century: 
1898-1936 1 (unit) 
Intensive study of the works of Unamuno, Azorin, Lorca, 
Grau, Hermanos Machado, etc., with special emphasis on 



the elements of existentialism, social protest and dramatic 
experimentation. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 306 Contemporary Spanish Theatre 1 (unit) 
A study of the most important works of Casona, Buero, 
Vallejo, Sastre, Paso and others, as a reflection of some of 
the social problems of contemporary Spain. 

En 311 Shakespeare 1 (unit) 
Reading of the collected plays, with class discussion of his- 
tory and criticism. Required of English majors. 

En 312 Shakespeare 1 (unit) 
A continuation of En 311. Required of English majors. 

Dr 313-314 Tutorial in Stage Design and Lighting 

1-1 (unit) 
Given in conjunction with the Art Department; study, design 
and actual building of sets for the semester play (Dr 201- 
202), presenting theatrical ideas through scene design and 
lighting. Limited, by permission only. 

En 343 Modern Drama 1 (unit) 
English and Continental drama from the end of the nine- 
teenth century through the present. Extensive reading and 
discussion. Offered 1974-75. 

En 344 Modern American Drama 1 (unit) 
American drama from the end of the nineteenth century 
through the present. Extensive reading and discussion. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Fr 407 Corneille, Racine, Moliere 1 (unit) 
The development of the classic theatre; new theories of the 
dramatic, the tragic and the comic. Thorough literary analy- 
sis of the dramatists' masterpieces. Outside readings re- 
quired. 

Fr 409 Modern French Drama 1 (unit) 
Discussion of plays from the French theater since 1920 by 
Claudel, Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Montherlant, Sartre 
and Camus as well as the most representative plays of the 
avant-garde theatre. Offered 1974-75. 



MUSIC 

The Music Program at Newton is designed to offer the inter- 
ested student a well-rounded exposure to music and per- 



36 



formance and includes in its curriculum courses in music 
theory, history of music, music appreciation and choral ac- 
tivities, and private lessons in applied vocal, keyboard and 
instrumental music. Musical activities on campus include 
two major concerts each year given by the Chorus, concerts 
by visiting artists and lectures. The multitude of concerts 
and musical performances in the Boston area offer an even 
greater exposure and experience to those who wish to make 
Music a part of their liberal education. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR 

The Music Program offers a minor to those students who 
complete a minimum of 5 courses in the program, with a 
grade of C or better, distributed as follows: 3 courses in the 
history of music, 1 course in music theory and 1 year of 
participation in the Chorus; or 4 courses in the history of 
music and 1 course in music theory. 

Students wishing to receive credit for applied music may 
take up to 2 units in Chorus or selected instruments taught 
by faculty of the Newton Music Program. Students may 
transfer up to 2 units for applied music from selected ac- 
credited institutions, with permission only. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

LE 145-146 Introduction to Music 1-1 (unit) 
A course designed for students who wish a general knowledge 
in music listening. The area to be covered will be the de- 
velopment of European music, with emphasis on major vocal 
and instrumental forms and the characteristics of music and 
major composers from pre-Baroque to the present. Guided 
listening to recordings, study of musical scores, attendance 
at specified concerts, collateral readings and individual 
projects will be included. Prerequisite to other music history 
courses. 

Mu 101 Fundamentals of Music 1 (unit) 
Designed for the student who wishes to learn the basic 
rudiments of music. Notation, rhythm, scales, intervals, 
chords and chordal progression will be emphasized. Open 
to all students. Offered 1974-75. 

MU 102 Theory 1 (unit) 
The study of basic two-, three- and four-part writing in func- 
tional harmony. Also beginning solfege (sight singing) with 
melodic and rhythmic dictation. 



Prerequisite: Mu 101 or permission of the instructor. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Mu 141-142 Music in the Western World 1-1 (unit) 
A survey of music with emphasis on the stylistic character 
and cultural climate of the important art epochs of Western 
Civilization. In addition, the survey will show how the various 
arts respond to the socio-cultural conditions and how they 
are related to each other. Offered 1974-75. 

Mu 201 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque 

1 (unit) 
A study of music from 1450-1750 covering vocal and in- 
strumental styles of the Renaissance and works of the great 
Baroque composers such as Monteverdi, Purcell, Bach and 
Handel. 

Prerequisite: Mu 141-142 or permission of the instructor. 

Mu 202 Music of the Classical and Romantic Period 

1 (unit) 
A study of music from 1750-1900, with emphasis on the 
music and life of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and Brahms. 
Prerequisite: MU 141-142 or permission of the instructor. 

Mu 203 Keyboard Instruments and Literature — The Ba- 
roque and Classical Periods 1 (unit) 
Survey of organ, clavichord, harpsichord and early pianoforte 
literature from Frescobaldi and Scheldt through Mozart and 
Beethoven. The development of the keyboard idioms and 
the clearly defined keyboard styles; special emphasis on the 
works of J. S. Bach. 

Prerequisite: Mu 141-142 or permission of the instructor. 

Mu 204 Keyboard Instruments and Literature — 19th 
and 20th Century Music 1 (unit) 
Concentration on individual masterpieces in both the new 
short forms and the older, longer forms; character piece, 
sonata and its extension. New movements and techniques 
in the 20th century: atonality, polytonality; uses of the ex- 
treme ranges of the piano. New instruments. 

Prerequisite: Mu 141-142 or permission of the instructor. 

Mu 205 Music in the Film 1 (unit) 
A study of how music has helped the film from the early 
silents to the present day. Different cinema genres will be 
covered, including musicals, westerns, romances, costume 
dramas, horror films, comedies and adventures. Lectures 
will include the most important contributors to the music 



37 



of film and discussions with the class on the art of com- 
posing for the film. 

Mu 260 Twentieth Century Music 1 (unit) 
The study of American and European contemporary com- 
posers, their styles and music and their influence on avant- 
garde techniques. The course will include lectures, demon- 
strations and listening, with related outside reading and 
required concert attendance. 

Prerequisite: Mu 201-202 or permission of the instructor. 

Mu 281-282, 283-284 Chorus 1/2-^2- Va-Va (unit) 
The Chorus is open to all interested students who enjoy 
singing. Credit is optional, attendance required; a student 
may receive up to 2 units for Chorus participation. Chorus 
activities include two joint concerts with orchestra and visit- 
ing male chorus presented each year and additional partici- 
pation on special occasions in College-wide events. Through 
choral literature, students explore music from the Middle 
Ages to the contemporary period. 

Mu 293-294 Tutorial in Instrumental Ensemble 

1/2-1/2 (unit) 
A select group of instrumentalists, with previous musical ex- 
perience in high school or college band or orchestra, who 
wish to play music for small ensemble and chamber groups. 
Acceptance by audition. 

Mu 497, 498 Independent Study in Music 

1/2-1. 1/2-1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a detailed description of the 
course requirements as agreed by the instructor directing 
the study and as approved by the Chairman and Division Di- 
rector. The student must successfully carry through the 
project as outlined. If these conditions are satisfied, the 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study course should be carried in any one semes- 
ter. (Please refer to policy on independent study.) 



38 



Division of Humanities 



1 (unit) 



1 (unit) 



Liberal Education courses offered in the Division are: 

LE 121 Introduction to Classical Civilization 1 (unit) 

LE 122 Introduction to Classical Civilization 

LE 123 Tradition and Growth 1 (unit) 

LE 124 Tradition and Growth 1 (unit) 

LE 125 The Image of Women in Literature 

LE 126 The Literary Experience 1 (unit) 

LE 127 What Goes Into a Novel? 1 (unit) 

LE 128 Where Is the Novel Going? 1 (unit) 

LE 139 The Search for the Individual 1 (unit) 

LE 140 The Search for Community 1 (unit) 

LE 149 Early Modern European Civilization 1 (unit) 

LE 150 Modern European Civilization 1 (unit) 

LE 153-154 American Civilization 1-1 (unit) 

LE 155 Philosophy of Culture 1 (unit) 
Offered 1974-75. 

LE 157 Philosophy of Man 1 (unit) 



Classics 

Communications 

Comparative Literature 

English 

History 

Philosophy 

Romance Languages 

German 

Italian 

The Division of Humanities offers majors in English, 
History, Philosophy, Romance Languages, French and 
Spanish and programs in Classics, Italian, Bilingual 
Teaching (in conjunction with Continuing Studies), 
Communications, Comparative Literature and Ger- 
man. 



CLASSICS 



The Classic Program is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to the major ideas and institutions of Greek 
and Roman civilization in relation to the continuum 
of human experience. To this end, courses are offered 
in English translation as well as the Greek and Latin 
languages. A member of the Newton College faculty 
conducts the program, and additional courses and 
resources are available through cross-registration at 
Boston College. 

LE 121, 122 Introduction to Classical Civilization 

1, 1 (unit) 
An examination of the major ideas and institutions of Clas- 
sical civilization through careful reading in English transla- 
tion of important writings from Antiquity: literary, philo- 
sophical, historical and political. The aim of the course will 



39 



be an understanding of the ways in which the Greeks and 
Romans approached those problems and ideas which, recur- 
rent in other eras and civilizations, are central to all human- 
istic investigations. Lectures, discussions and reports. 

CI L 101-102 Elementary Latin 1-1 (unit) 
Offered 1973-74 and alternate years. 

CI L 201-202 Introduction to Latin Literature 

1-1 (unit) 
Offered 1974-75 and alternate years. 

CI G 101-102 Elementary Greek 1-1 (unit) 
Offered 1974-75 and alternate years. 

CI 497, 498 Independent Study in Classics 

y2-l. Va-l (unit) 
Independent Study in Classics may involve a program of 
readings in Greek and/or Latin, in English translation, or a 
combination of the two, depending upon the nature of the 
student's project. 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present for approval to the Division 
Director a typewritten detailed description of the course re- 
quirements as agreed to by the professor directing the study. 
The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that In- 
dependent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 



Cm 101-102 Communications: The Uses of Language 

1-1 (unit) 
This course in expository and experimental writing empha- 
sizes the control of meaning through critical and creative 
thinking and through mastery of style. Students will be asked 
to read thoughtfully and to participate regularly in informal 
class discussions on a variety of texts representing a wide 
range of themes. The first semester course will include an 
introduction to library and research skills. During the second 
semester the readings will be supplemented by a series of 
films presented in cooperation with the Art Department. 
Classes limited to 20 students. 



Cm 205 Communications Seminar and Workshop 

1 (unit) 
A workshop in media. This course is designed to explore 
the photograph, the photographic collage, film, radio, tele- 
vision and their multi-media combinations as communica- 
tions. No previous experience with these media is required 
or presupposed. The following outline indicates the work of 
this course: 1. The statement a photograph makes; 2. The 
advertising photograph as motivation; 3. Images in combina- 
tion and contrast; 4. Images that move; 5. Sound without 
images; 6. Sound with images; 7. Television — as entertain- 
ment; 8. Television — as motivation; 9. Television vs. film; 
10. The combination of media. 

These areas will be explored through practical assign- 
ments. Some of these will require familiarity with the writ- 
ings of Mortimer Adier, Peter Dechert, Marshall McLuhan, 
A. J. Liebling, Joe McGinnis, Huey Newton. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



The Communications program for freshmen responds 
to the belief that the student's pursuit of a liberal 
education must be accompanied by facility in writing, 
reading, logical thinking, discussion and critical dia- 
logue. In addition, the student should become aware 
of the resources of the library and of the expectations 
of the faculty in the writing of research term papers. 
The study of film, an increasingly important medium, 
is also introduced. 



Cm 497, 498 Independent Study in Communications 

1/2-1, V2-I (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or more semester of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
Professor directing the course and as approved by the De- 
partment Chairman and the Division Director. The student 
must successfully carry through the project as outlined. It 
is only if these conditions are satisfied that the Independent 
Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 



40 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



The English, Romance Language and Classics faculty 
cooperate in offering a program in Comparative Lit- 
erature. The courses give the student the opportunity 
to study literature on a comparative basis. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

LE 123 Tradition and Growth 1 (unit) 
A study of some of the works that have shaped western lit- 
erature from classical to modern times. Whenever possible, 
the older texts will be discussed in conjunction with related 
contemporary texts dealing with similar themes. During the 
first semester, the principal texts studied will be the Homeric 
epics, Greek tragedy and comedy, Roman satire and Virgil's 
Aeneid. Offered 1974-75. 

LE 124 Tradition and Growth 1 (unit) 
A continuation of LE 123. The second semester's reading 
will include The Confessions of St. Augustine, Dante's Divine 
Comedy, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and Cervantes' Don 
Quixote. Offered 1974-75. 

CP 205 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
The aim of this course is to offer students of language and 
literature an opportunity to study various literary movements 
in Italy, France and Spain through representative writers. 
The course will concentrate on the variations and interpreta- 
tions of the theme of love (courtly and neoplatonic tradi- 
tions), death and fate which highlighted the literature of 
these countries during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. 
The course will be conducted in English and bilingual texts 
will be used. Offered 1974-75. 

CP 206 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
A continuation of CP 205. Offered 1974-75. 

CP 207 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
A comparative study of the development of European ide- 
alistic and realistic novels as separate genre up to and in- 
cluding the merging of these currents in the later Renais- 
sance. 

Although each novel will be studied and discussed for its 
literary merits, great emphasis will be placed on the literary 
work as a source of social, religious and political criticism 



of the epoch. Special attention will be given to Boccaccio, 
Rabelais and Cervantes. 

CP 305 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
Lectures and class work as for CP 205. Students wishing to 
receive upper-division credit in Spanish, French or Italian 
must, in addition, complete a significant portion of the 
course work under the supervision of the respective language 
department. Offered 1974-75. 

CP 306 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
A continuation of CP 305. Offered 1974-75. 

CP 307 Comparative Romance Literature 1 (unit) 
Lectures and class work as for CP 207. Students wishing to 
receive upper-division credit in Spanish, French or Italian 
must, in addition, complete a significant portion of the 
course work under the supervision of the respective language 
department. 

CP 497, 498 Independent Study in Comparative 
Literature 1/2-1. Va-l (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or more semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor directing the study and as approved by the Division 
Director. The student must successfully carry through the 
project as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satis- 
fied that the Independent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 



ENGLISH 

If a liberal education is primarily concerned with 
meaning, values and the definition and recognition 
of human dignity, then language and literature are 
central to such an education; and in the 1970's every 
serious student is aware of this. 

Through the study of literature we become aware 
of how human beings in all ages have imaginatively 
shaped, interpreted and affirmed their own experi- 



41 



ence. Through the study of languages and literatures 
not their own, students multiply their power of under- 
standing and communicating with others. The stu- 
dent of English and American literature has a per- 
sonal involvement, both intellectual and emotional, 
with her subject matter. If she decides to specialize, 
she will herself create and carry out, with faculty 
guidance and help, a sound and coherent program 
through which, while doing justice to the wide variety 
of available material, she satisfies her own aims and 
interests. Lectures and seminars may be supple- 
mented by independent study. Course offerings vary 
in their approach. Some give intensive training in the 
techniques and themes of one genre; others stress 
the placing of works in their historical context; others 
focus on a major author or a single theme; still others 
explore the theoretical basis of literature and criti- 
cism. 

Such study encourages discrimination in thought 
and expression and serves as preparation for many 
careers, as well as for personal development. 

Successful completion of the Communications re- 
quirement (see general requirements for the degree) 
is prerequisite for all courses except En 201-202 
and LE 105 and 106. All courses are open to non- 
English majors with the permission of the instructor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
The requirements for the major in English are: 
En 201-202 
En 213, 214 and 215 

En 311 and 312 

Six upper-division courses, two of which must be in the 
period preceding 1800. 

Senior Project. This requirement may be satisfied by tak- 
ing one semester of En 401, 402 or 403, 404 or by doing 
an individual Senior Project such as a thesis. 

A total of eight upper-division courses must be completed 
with a grade of C or better. 



En 225 is highly recommended for majors. 
All majors must have their course of study approved by 
their advisor prior to registration. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

The requirements for the minor in English are: 

Either En 201-202 and three upper-division courses or 
four upper-division courses. 

LE 125 The Image of Woman in Literature 1 (unit) 
Analysis of the ways women have been portrayed in litera- 
ture of different periods and styles, with emphasis on the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A number of speculative 
questions will be explored. What recurrent images of women 
can be found in such a study? How truly do these images 
represent the reality of "women's nature"? How do they re- 
flect the myths, fantasies and ideals of the writer and his 
age? How does literature help to define woman's idea of her- 
self? Offered 1974-75. 

LE 126 The Literary Experience 1 (unit) 
Exploration of possible answers to the question "What is 
Literature?" While principal and contrasting theories will be 
presented through the cooperative effort of the professors, 
class discussions will permit testing the validity of past and 
present propositions and allow for student reactions. Al- 
though the structure of the course will be theoretic, selected 
writings will be analyzed for their literary function, thematics 
and genre. Offered 1974-75. 

LE 127 What Goes Into a Novel? 1 (unit) 
Do all novels echo the special circumstances (social, eco- 
nomic, philosophical, religious) of the period when they are 
written? A comparative examination, from this point of view, 
of five novels. 

LE 128 Where is the Novel Going? 1 (unit) 
A study of the direction in which contemporary fiction in 
English seems to be moving. This will require a backward 
glance at earlier novels and a comparison with some now 
being written. 

En 201-202 History of English Literature 1-1 (unit) 
A survey of English literature designed to give the student 
a background for more specialized courses. Both semesters 
are required of English majors. This requirement may be 
waived by passing a qualifying examination. Two sections, 
each limited to 25 students. 



42 



En 213 Introduction to Drama 1 (unit) 
Several modern plays compared with plays of earlier periods 
in order to explore the historical and theatrical relations 
between them. 

En 214 Introduction to the Novel 1 (unit) 
Practice in critical analysis of fiction and in critical writing 
through the intensive study of a single English or American 
novel. 

En 215 Introduction to Poetry 1 (unit) 
A course designed to acquaint the students with the themes 
and techniques of poetry and to give the student practice 
in the critical analysis of poetry. Offered 1974-75. 

En 225 Introduction to Literary Theory 1 (unit) 
Reading and discussion of modern theories of the nature 
and function of literature. Highly recommended for English 
majors. Offered 1974-75. 

En 241 Creative Writing 1 (unit) 
Workshop in fiction, poetry and drama. Writing sample must 
be submitted. Enrollment limited to 12. 

En 242 Creative Writing 1 (unit) 
Continuation of EN 241. 

En 285 Post-World War II British Novel 1/2 (unit) 
Reading and discussion of eight novels. 

En 286 Post-World War II American Novel V2 (unit) 
Reading and discussion of eight novels. 

En 301 Old English Language and Literature 1 (unit) 
Introduction to Old English grammar; reading, analysis and 
discussion of Old English poetry and prose in the original 
and in translation. 

En 302 History of the English Language 1 (unit) 
A chronological survey of the development of the English 
language from the Old English period to the present. Repre- 
sentative samples from each period will be analyzed in detail, 
with emphasis on phonology, vocabulary, grammar and 
idiom. Readings will include contemporary essays on cur- 
rent approaches to language and linguistics. 

En 305 Chaucer and the Fourteenth Century 1 (unit) 
Readings in the poetry of Chaucer, Langland, and the "Pearl 
Poet," in Middle English and in translation, set in the con- 



text of fourteenth century historical and intellectual move- 
ments. 

En 306 Spenser and the Sixteenth Century 1 (unit) 
Reading and analysis of the minor poems and the Faerie 
Queens, with a study of early Renaissance literary and cul- 
tural history. 

En 311 Shakespeare 1 (unit) 
Reading of the collected plays, with class discussion of his- 
tory and criticism. Required of English majors. 

En 312 Shakespeare 1 (unit) 
A continuation of En 311. Required of English majors. 

En 314 Milton and the Seventeenth Century 1 (unit) 
Reading, analysis and discussion of Milton's poetry and 
prose, with a study of related poetry and prose of the late 
Renaissance in England. 

En 315 Eighteenth Century Novel 1 (unit) 
A study in the development of the novel as an art form. 
Authors to be read include Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, 
Smollett, Sterne, Goldsmith and Fanny Burney. Offered 
1974-75. 

En 317 Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century 
Literature 1 (unit) 
A study of prose, drama and poetry centering around 1660; 
the focus will be on the new city culture emerging and its 
influence on the development of Neoclassicism. Authors in- 
clude: Butler, Bunyan, Defoe, Pepys, Dryden, Pope and Swift. 

En 320 The Novel in the Nineteenth Century 1 (unit) 
Fiction from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy. Several novels 
will be studied both as artistic creations and as cultural and 
social documents. 

En 321 Romantic Poets 1 (unit) 
Extensive reading of the major poets (Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron) with class discussion of the 
spirit and literary theory of the school. Offered 1974-75. 

En 324 Literature and History of Victorian England 

1 (unit) 
How the literature of Victorian England reflects major social 
and political issues that still affect contemporary English 
society. If this course is taken for history credit, the number 
is Hi 354. Offered 1974-75. 



43 



En 326 Victorian Poetry 1 (unit) 
Readings in the works of the major Victorian poets, especially 
Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti and Arnold. Attention will be 
given to the social and aesthetic values of the age as re- 
flected in the verse. 

En 341 The Modern American Novel 1 (unit) 
The American Novel from 1910 to the present. Offered 
1974-75. 

En 342 The Modern British Novel 1 (unit) 
Critical reading and discussion of major and minor authors 
placed in the context of twentieth-century British society. 
Offered 1974-75. 

En 343 Modern Drama 1 (unit) 
English and Continental drama from the end of the nine- 
teenth century through the present. Extensive reading and 
discussion. Offered 1974-75. 

En 344 Modern American Drama 1 (unit) 
American drama from the end of the nineteenth century 
through the present. Extensive reading and discussion. 
Offered 1975-76. 

En 345 Modern American Poetry 1 (unit) 
Close reading of twentieth-century poets with some research 
on minor figures. 

En 346 Modern British Poetry 1 (unit) 
Close reading of twentieth-century poets with some research 
on minor figures. Offered 1974-75. 

En 348 Anglo-Irish Literature 1 (unit) 
Discussion of drama, poetry and fiction of the Irish literary 
Renaissance. 

Ln 349 Satire 1 (unit) 
Selected satiric works representing various genres and pe- 
riods from classical to modern times. Discussion of the 
theory, themes and techniques of satire. Analysis of the 
problems involved in defining satire from social, philosophi- 
cal and formalist points of view. Offered 1974-75. 

En 351-352 Survey of American Literature 1-1 (unit) 
Study of American literature from the seventeenth to the 
nineteenth century with emphasis on developing awareness 
of the Millennium. 

Second semester: Disillusionment in the Millennium and 



the American Dream Become Nightmare: (Walt Whitman to 
the present). 

En 360 The Colonial Writers 1 (unit) 
Study of the earliest writings of America. Representative 
selections will be taken from Pilgrim journals, Puritan prose, 
early poetry, essays and sermons. Offered 1975-76. 

En 362 The American Short Story 1 (unit) 
A survey of the development of the short story in America 
from Washington Irving to the present. Lectures will be given 
on representative short stories in order to study developing 
trends in the form. Students will be expected to read groups 
of short stories not discussed in class. 

En 362 Realism and Naturalism in American Literature 

1 (unit) 
Study of the development of the realist and naturalist move- 
ments from 1865-1910. Selections from Twain, Howells, 
Dreiser, Lewis, etc. Offered 1974-75. 

En 363 The Twenties and Thirties 1 (unit) 
A study of two decades in American fiction. Emphasis will 
be placed on such movements as the Harlem Renaissance, 
the Expatriate Writers and Literature of the Depression. Stu- 
dents will be required to do additional research on one as- 
pect of the course so that they will have intensive knowledge 
in one literary movement within the two decades. 

En 366 Contemporary Literature in America 1 (unit) 
Discussion of drama, novels and poetry considered in the 
light of the cultural and aesthetic values of contemporary 
America. Offered 1974-75. 

En 368 Modern Literature of the American South 

1 (unit) 
Fiction, essays and poetry of writers such as Katherine Ann 
Porter, William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe and James Dickey, 
considered against the historical and cultural background of 
the South. 

En 371-372 Tutorial 

A student may arrange to study a body of literary material 
on a one-toone (or at most three-to-one) basis with a faculty 
member. The student(s) meets regularly with the teacher 
once a week for an hour, has a regular written as well as 
reading assignment, and discusses her reading as well as 
her paper each time with the leader. 

Suggested topics: Henry James, Jane Austen, Metaphysi- 



44 



cal poets, Criticism, Fielding and Richardson, T. S. Eliot, 
George Orwell. 

En 401, 402 English Literature Seminar 1, 1 (unit) 
Every year the Department offers one or more seminars for 
advanced students. Possible topics: Jane Austen, Henry 
James, Conrad and Lawrence, Jacobean Drama, Metaphysi- 
cal Poetry. 1973-74 Spring only. In Spring 1974 topic for 
En 402 is Modern Dramatic Convention and Form. 

En 403, 404 American Literature Seminar 1, 1 (unit) 
Every year the Department offers one or more seminars for 
advanced students. Possible topics: Melville, Hawthorne 
and Poe; Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman; Hemingway and 
Fitzgerald. 1973-74 Fall and Spring. In 1973 the topic for 
En 403, 404 is Hemingway and Fitzgerald. 

En 497, 498 Independent Study In English 1/2-1. V2-I 
(unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the pro- 
fessor supervising the study and as approved by the Depart- 
ment Chairman and the Division Director. The student must 
successfully carry through the project as outlined. It is only 
if these conditions are satisfied that Independent Study will 
carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 

En 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 



HISTORY 

The study of history deals with the question of con- 
tinuity and change demonstrating its recurrence in 
every civilization. What counts in studying history is 
not the accumulation of facts (useful though it is to 
know them), but the acquisition of a habit of mind — 
objective, curious and critical. Tracing the thought, 
achievements and discoveries of man, the student 



I 



finds his own historical period more intelligible 
through its likeness and contrast with periods in the 
past. To achieve this result she must see the study 
of history as a scholarly discipline which, once 
learned, she may herself apply to facts and situations 
not covered in actual course work. No undergraduate 
history department can explore in detail the increas- 
ingly complex background of every continent and 
country. At Newton, lecture and seminar courses 
stress major developments in European, American 
and Russian history. 

Interdisciplinary courses, in which the History De- 
partment participates, illustrate the interaction of in- 
tellectual, economic and literary factors with political 
events. 

Those who major in history are solidly grounded 
in the scholarly reading, researching and writing of 
history. Students planning to do graduate work are 
urged to enrich their historical awareness through 
courses in the social sciences, as well as in languages 
and literature. Course presentation is varied: basic 
surveys, lecture-discussion and seminar classes, and 
independent study under faculty members on ma- 
terial not represented in formal courses. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Students majoring in history must fulfill the following re- 
quirements with a grade of C or better: 12 units and a senior 
project to be completed in an area of the student's choice. 
Students planning to attend graduate school are reminded 
of the advisability of choosing their courses with this in mind. 
This should involve an indication of some special field of 
interest, as well as appropriate allied courses which will aid 
in the further study of history. 

History 201 is required of all history majors in their sopho- 
more year. In addition LE 149-150 and LE 153-154 are 
strongly advised in the freshman or sophomore year. All 
majors should submit their proposed schedule of courses to 
the Department Chairman prior to the semester registration. 



45 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

The History Department also offers a minor in history to 
those students who complete five units with a grade of C or 
better. Of these 5 units, 3 must be acquired above the LE 
level. 

LE 149 Early Modern European Civilization 1 (unit) 
An analysis of how historians have looked at the develop- 
ment of European civilization from the Renaissance to the 
French Revolution, and how political and economic factors 
have been related to intellectual and social development. 

LE 150 Modern European Civilization 1 (unit) 
A study of selected topics in European civilization since the 
French Revolution with special reference to how historians 
have approached these problems. 

LE 153 American Civilization I 1 (unit) 
A multi-dimensional, inter-disciplinary approach which 
stresses the sources and methodologies by which historians 
and other social scientists strive for a fuller understanding 
of this nation's historical and cultural heritage. Through 
recourse to field trips, visiting lecturers, films, television, 
documentaries, etc., students will have the opportunity to 
examine in depth and breadth the various roads to learning 
and understanding about our societal past in the years 
1000-1865 A.D. 

LE 154 American Civilization II 1 (unit) 
A multi-dimensional, inter-disciplinary analysis of the cul- 
tural and historical evolution of American society since the 
Civil War. The emphasis will be on those thematic develop- 
ments which have most affected the American social ethos 
during this period. The students will be exposed to a variety 
of learning experiences such as films, television documen- 
taries, field trips to archival libraries, the monitoring of tele- 
vision news programs, etc. They will also be expected to 
read widely in such areas as history, literature, social com- 
mentary, political science and sociology. 

Hi 202 Introduction to the Study of History 1 (unit) 
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student 
with the reading and writing of history. The techniques of 
historical research, and the problems of divergent interpreta- 
tion, distinguishing fact from opinion, and drawing adequate 
conclusions from the material available will be treated in 
depth. The student will be introduced to a history of the 



development of historical writing, the characteristics of the 
great historians as seen in their works and the basic bibli- 
ographic sources for the major fields of historical study. 

Hi 203-204 Political and Economic History of the 
United States 1-1 (unit) 
Reading, lectures and discussion together with off-campus 
tours. The first semester will treat the following topics: 
American Revolution, Mercantilism, Era of Jefferson, Ameri- 
can System, Age of Jackson, Manifest Destiny, Civil War and 
Reconstruction. The second semester will focus on such 
topics as: The Gilded Age, Industrialism, Imperialism, 
Agrarian Revolt, Trusts, Progressive Era, Depression, World 
War I and II, Cold War and The Age of Affluence 1945-1965. 

Hi 338 Europe in a Wider World, 1300-1700 1 (unit) 
This course will treat late Medieval and early Modern voy- 
ages of discovery and ventures of a mercantile, religious or 
political nature which brought Europeans into contact with 
other peoples and broadened the scope of European civiliza- 
tion. Special topics will include: European reactions to other 
cultures, the dual importance of trade and religion in stimu- 
lating exploration, and the foundation of the Portuguese and 
Spanish Empires. Source readings will be used extensively. 

Hi 339 The European Renaissance, 1300-1500 

1 (unit) 
A survey of the political, economic, intellectual and artistic 
development of Western Europe, with special attention to 
Italy as a crucible of change. Topics covered will include: 
decline of Papacy and Empire, the varieties of Humanism, 
the search for reform of the Church, economic fluctuation, 
the beginnings of European expansion, new trends in art and 
music. 

Hi 340 The European Reformation, 1500-1600 

1 (unit) 
Major trends of sixteenth century political, religious and in- 
tellectual history. The focus will be on the division of Chris- 
tendom into Protestant and Catholic camps, but the program 
of moderate reform, the sectarians and developments in 
political thought, literature and the arts will also be con- 
sidered. 

Hi 343 Revolutionary Europe 1 (unit) 
This course will deal with the political, social and intellectual 
facets of the European revolutionary movements from 1789 



46 



to 1848. Although the French Revolution of 1789 will be 
studied in detail, great emphasis will also be placed on its 
general impact on European civilization through the Restora- 
tion period especially in Italy and Germany. 

Hi 344 Europe in the Age of Realpolitik 1 (unit) 
The development of the effects of nationalism, socialism 
and industrialism on Europe from 1848 to 1914. The great 
unifications, the rise of Marxian socialism, the new impe- 
rialism and the impact of the shift from romanticism to 
realism in politics will be considered. 

Hi 345 Europe Between the Wars 1 (unit) 
A study of the major political, intellectual and socio-eco- 
nomic trends in Europe from 1914-1939: World War I and 
its impact on European society, the rise of the totalitarian 
right, economic depression and political aggression, the crisis 
in ideological values, and the impact on Europe of Soviet 
Russia will be considered as historical phenomena in them- 
selves and in relation to the origins of World War II. Offered 
1974-75. 

Hi 346 Contemporary Europe 1 (unit) 
Major developments in European history since 1939 will be 
analyzed and discussed in their historical contexts, including 
World War II, its course, its character and the problems it 
created in European society, the Cold War, the collapse of 
Empire, variation in Marxist states and the resurgence of 
Europe. Offered 1974-75. 

HI 351 Politics and Society in Modern France 1 (unit) 
A study of the basic issues in French history since 1848, 
the conflict between democracy and authority as seen in her 
changing political structures, the basic social and economic 
issues dividing Frenchmen and the vehicles through which 
they were expressed, the effect of war on France, her loss 
of empire and the changing role of France in Europe. 

Hi 354 History and Literature of Victorian England 

1 (unit) 
How the prose literature of Victorian England reflects major 
social and political issues that still affect contemporary 
English society. Offered 1974-75. 

Hi 356 The Thought of Modern Europe 1 (unit) 
In-depth reading and discussion of some of the great thinkers 
of nineteenth and twentieth century Europe with special at- 
tention given to the relation of the intellectual to the society 



in which he lives. The thinkers chosen will vary from year 
to year. 

Hi 363 Czarist Russia 1 (unit) 
A study of the major developments in Russian history from 
rise of the Romanovs to the revolutions of the twentieth 
century. Special attention will be paid to the growth of the 
Russian monarchy, the problems of rural Russia, Russia's 
relations with Western Europe and the development of the 
revolutionary ideology. Offered 1974-75. 

Hi 371 America in the Middle Period, 1800-1850 

1 (unit) 
A study of American political, social, economic and intel- 
lectual developments from the "Jeffersonian Revolution" of 
1800 through the influences of "Jacksonian Democracy." 

Hi 373 The Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction 

1 (unit) 
An extended examination of the critical issues and person- 
alities during the greatest tragedy in the nation's domestic 
history. Particular attention will be devoted to the dynamics 
of slavery as a social, economic and racist institution in the 
mind and life of American society, the disruption of the 
American constitutional system, and the efforts to restructure 
American society in the postwar period. 

Hi 375 U.S. Diplomacy to 1914 1 (unit) 
An extended, in-depth analysis of the evolution of American 
foreign policy from its European and colonial origins to the 
advent of "The Great War." The principal focus will be on 
the problems, policies and personalities which most affected, 
and effected, the nation's transition from colonial appendage 
to global power. 

Hi 376 U.S. Diplomatic History Since 1914 1 (unit) 
A detailed examination and analysis of those events which 
conditioned America's role as the world colossus in the 
twentieth century. Particular attention will be focused on 
the diplomacy of neutrality in World War I, the Treaty of 
Versailles, the American response to totalitarianism, the role 
of the "Big Three" in World War II, the Cold War era, and 
the American involvements in Indochina and Latin America. 
Students will be expected to utilize the excellent archival 
and research libraries in the greater Boston area which are 
available for scholarly use by undergraduates. 

Hi 377-378 Twentieth Century America 1-1 (unit) 
An historical examination of the growth of the American 



47 



nation from a semirural to a highly urbanized society and 
the American political response to this challenge of change. 
Important topics include: origins, nature and significance of 
the Progressive Movement; the ethnic and economic oriented 
politics of the twenties; Depression; New Deal; rise of the 
new mass-production-consumption economy; the second re- 
construction and welfare statism from Truman to Johnson. 
Appropriate reading assignments comprise an integral 
part of this course. 

HI 379 American Constitutional Development 1 (unit) 
An historical study of the origins of the American constitu- 
tional system (1607-1789); the nature of the federal union, 
the question of who had the power to interpret the consti- 
tution (1789-1865) and the problems and adjustments of 
the constitutional system arising from the challenges of a 
modern, industrialized urban society (1865-Present). 

Hi 381-382 The Black Man in American History 

1-1 (unit) 
Fall Semester: 1501 to 1877, from Negro slavery in the 
West Indies to the end of the Reconstruction period in the 
United States. Spring Semester: 1877 to the present time, 
from the beginnings of hard core segregation to the con- 
tinuing struggles for full acceptance and equality. 

Hi 383 Red, White and Black in the American West 

1 (unit) 
An extended analysis, utilizing history, literature, folklore, 
cultural anthropology and films as sources for a better un- 
derstanding of the American West as an integral part of the 
nation's past and present cultural heritage. 

Hi 385 Colonial America, 1607-1763 1 (unit) 
An intensive historical examination of the origins, nature, 
problems and relevancy of the political, economic, social and 
cultural systems of early America. This is a reading and 
discussion course with maximum student participation. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Hi 388 The American Revolution 1763-1789 1 (unit) 
An intensive examination of the causes, consequences, mo- 
tives and meaning of the American Revolution. Reviewed 
also will be the changing historical interpretation and recent 
reappraisals of the Revolutionary Generation. The Confeder- 
ation period will be examined in relation to the themes of 
change and continuity. 



This is a reading and discussion course with maximum 
student participation. 

Hi 401 Seminar in European History 1 (unit) 
An intensive study of major topics in European history since 
the Renaissance. This course will include extensive bibli- 
ographical work, considerable reading and discussion and a 
research paper. The topics for the course will vary from 
year to year. Designed specifically for senior history majors, 
and open to others only with permission. 

Hi 453 Problems in American History 1 (unit) 
Each student will choose a problem for investigation and 
read comprehensively about the problem selected. An oral 
presentation and an edited anthology are required. Open 
only to students who have taken an upper-division course in 
the area they have chosen to investigate. 

Hi 455 The Emergence of the Individual, 1300-1750 

1 (unit) 
Proposing that the autonomous individual, increasingly self- 
aware and introspective, is a key theme in the development 
of the modern world, this course will consider the emergence 
of individuality through a study of representative autobi- 
ographies, memoirs and letters of the period. Special projects 
will be permitted in any time period. 

Hi 495, 496 Tutorial in European History 1, 1 (unit) 
Carefully directed readings and discussion in a field of stu- 
dent interest not included in regular course offerings. En- 
rollment limited to 2-7 students. 

HI 497, 498 Independent Study in History 1, 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor directing the study and as approved by the Chair- 
man and Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 

Hi 499 Senior Project 
Required of all majors. 



48 



PHILOSOPHY 



The philosophy program is based on the conviction 
that action must be informed with both critical re- 
flection and vision if it is to proceed from a complete 
awareness of what such action involves. 

A wide variety of courses is available in the Depart- 
ment: courses such as analytic philosophy and sym- 
bolic logic should aid the student in developing her 
critical reflection, while others such as the search for 
the individual, philosophy of creativity, values and 
contemporary man, and philosophy in literature 
should help the student broaden her vision and for- 
mulate a meaningful personal philosophy. Belief in 
William James' statement: "To know the chief rival 
attitudes towards life, as the history of human think- 
ing has developed them, and to have heard some of 
the reasons they can give for themselves, ought to 
be considered an essential part of liberal education," 
has led the Department to stress the importance of 
the sequence of courses offered in the history of 
philosophy. 

The study of philosophy has always been held in 
honor at Newton and regarded as an indispensable 
requisite for study in any department as well as for 
the development of a thoughtful adult. Therefore, 
most courses in the Department are open to every 
student. 

The student planning to major in philosophy will 
work out her own program with the advice of the De- 
partment. Some programs could be oriented spe- 
cifically toward graduate studies. Other programs 
could be designed to take advantage of the interdis- 
ciplinary and integrative role of philosophy to in- 
crease the student's understanding of herself and 
her relations to others. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Prerequisites: (1) Ph 117 Logic and Certitude or 
Ph 211 Symbolic Logic 

(2) Ph 144 Metaphysics 

(3) One of the following: 

a) Ph 232 Values and Contemporary 

man 

b) Ph 237 Social Philosophy 

c) Ph 234 Contemporary Problems in 

Ethics 
Required courses: Eight upper-division units selected from 
courses labeled either (A) or (B). The selection must in- 
clude at least three from each group. 

A. History of Philosophy and Modern Philosophy 
318 Plato and Aristotle 

320 Descartes and Modern Philosophy 

325 British Empiricists 

326 Existentialism 

330 Modern Rationalists 

B. Problems of Philosophy 

340 Problems in Medieval Philosophy 

341 Science and Mysticism: From Pascal to Teilhard 

343 Philosophy of Language 

344 Contemporary Analytic Philosophy 

345 Far Eastern Philosophy 

Courses in the major must be completed with a minimum 
grade of C. Majors should also submit an acceptable senior 
project. 

Majors are advised to acquire the reading knowledge of 
a foreign language (preferably French or German) and to 
take the Graduate Record Examination at the end of their 
junior year or at the beginning of their senior year. 

Prior to registration, all majors must submit their pro- 
grams of study to the Department for review and approval. 
Frequent consultation with the members of the Department 
is strongly advised for all majors. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

For a minor in philosophy the requirements are as follows: 
a minimum grade of C in five courses. One of the courses 
must be chosen from the prerequisites and at least one each 
from Section A and Section B. 

LE 139 The Search for the Individual 1 (unit) 
An examination of differing philosophies from the viewpoint 



49 



of the nature of man. The works of representative philoso- 
phers of the Platonic, Aristotelian, Idealistic, Pragmatic, 
Naturalistic and Existentialist approached will be read and 
discussed. 

LE 140 The Search for Community 

An examination of differing political philosophies from the 
viewpoint of distinct philosophies of community. The works 
of representative philosophers of the Platonic, Aristotelian, 
Idealistic, Pragmatic, Naturalistic and Existentialist ap- 
proached will be read and discussed. 

LE 155 Philosophy of Culture 1 (unit) 
The course examines man's attempts to improve the quality 
of human life through a search for order and a meaningful 
existence in social institutions. A study of such issues — as 
they are reflected in some major literary, philosophical and 
religious works — is intended to acquaint the student with 
certain typical concepts and methods of investigation com- 
mon to the humanities. The aim is to develop skills of 
analysis, synthesis and critical evaluation which would en- 
able a person to understand herself and her environment. 
Offered 1974-75. 

LE 157 Philosophy of Man 1 (unit) 
This course aims at waking the dormant philosopher in each 
student as she learns to inquire into herself, her relation- 
ship to others and to society, her own values and the mea- 
sure of her involvement in the world. 

The student will examine the full connotation of a dy- 
namic view of man and the world (Bergson; Teilhard de 
Chardin). She will study different philosophies of knowledge 
(with special emphasis on the existential approach of Marcel 
and Buber). She will explore various means of self-knowl- 
edge: yoga, sense relaxation, Sufi dancing and transcendental 
meditation, experiencing these as far as possible. Finally 
she will search for new values in a world where traditional 
values are being questioned. 

Ph 117 Logic and Certitude 1 (unit) 
A study of the nature of meaning, definition and informal 
fallacy plus a formal analysis of inference. The course offers 
an aid to the student in her search for clarity of thought and 
expression and provides an examination of the sources, kinds 
and criteria of truth and certitude. 



Ph 144 Metaphysics 1 (unit) 
A study of classical and contemporary views on such prob- 
lems as the nature of time, casuality, freedom, self-identity, 
beauty and reality. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 159 History of Philosophy I 1 (unit) 
Pre-Socrates to Locke. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 160 History of Philosophy II 1 (unit) 
Locke to Present. 

An introduction to some of the basic ideas of the main 
philosophers in the history of Western thought. Stress will 
be placed on problems pertinent to the contemporary world. 
The class will read the same primary sources and groups 
within the class will read different secondary sources, then 
compare them to the primary sources. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 211 Symbolic Logic 1 (unit) 
Introduction to the current methods of formal logic and 
logical analysis. The theory of truth functions and preposi- 
tional calculus; normal schemata and Boolean expansions; 
duality; proofs of consistency and validity. Properties, de- 
velopment and interpretation of axiomatic theories (logistic 
systems). Calculus of functions: uniform quantification and 
methods of natural deduction; general theory of quantifica- 
tion, introduction of the theories of identity, classes and re- 
lations. Theory of descriptions. Logical and semantical para- 
doxes. Applications in the analysis of argumentative prose. 

This course presupposes no specialized training in logic 
and mathematics. 

No prerequisites. Open to freshmen and upperclassmen. 
Not open to students who have taken Ph 317. 

Ph 223 American Philosophy 1 (unit) 
Jonathan Edwards to Sidney Hook. General historical trends, 
together with an analysis of the principal texts of William 
James, Josiah Royce, John Dewey and Alfred North White- 
head. 

Ph 232 Values and Contemporary Man 1 (unit) 
Contemporary man's search for values in a rapidly changing 
world where traditional values are collapsing will be investi- 
gated. Changing attitudes toward the family, abortion, 
woman's role, sex, the Black-White problem, war, society and 
"our American culture" will be examined in turn. 

Psychological, sociological, philosophical essays as well as 
novels, films and art will be the basis of the investigation. 



50 



Ph 234 Contemporary Problems in Ethics 1 (unit) 
A study of representative views, historical and modern, as to 
the nature of moral judgment, emotion and values. Ethical 
considerations concerning rights and responsibilities in social 
justice, international relations, expression of dissent and 
sexual conduct will be discussed. 

Ph 237 Social Philosophy 1 (unit) 
An examination of the philosophical and moral doctrines in- 
volved in such social conceptions as utility, the common 
good, natural law and natural rights, justice and equality, 
tolerance and liberty. 

Ph 244 History of Contemporary American Philosophy 

1 (unit) 
Dominant philosophy in America today. Its elements and 
their origin in social, literary, economic, religious and politi- 
cal movements of the recent past. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 318 Plato and Aristotle 1 (unit) 
Their philosophical theories as an outgrovrth of their pre- 
decessors' opinions; the essential distinctions between them; 
their role in the formation of the philosophy of Augustine 
and Thomas. Not open to students who have taken PH 321. 

Ph 320 Descartes and Modern Philosophy 1 (unit) 
Reading and interpretation of Descartes' main works in the 
light of his reaction to antecedent philosophies (Scholasti- 
cism and Scepticism) and to the general mathematical and 
scientific ambiance of his time. His decisive influence on 
the whole of modern philosophy and thought with special 
emphasis on the cog/to controversy (Husserl, Sartre, Marcel). 
Husserl's Cartesian Meditations. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 324 Philosophies of Education 1 (unit) 
The principal task of this course is to investigate the 
philosophical foundations of educational practice. Various 
philosophical approaches are investigated under three main 
categories: Experimentalism, with the main emphasis on 
experience; Essentialism, with the main emphasis on knowl- 
edge; and Perennialism, with the main emphasis on value. 
Under the rubric of these three categories, various positions 
in Philosophy of Education are examined: from Naturalism 
and Progressivism to Analytic and Ordinary Language Phi- 
losophy, to Humanism and Existential Phenomenology. 
Practical applications are explored with reference to educa- 



tional aims, curriculum, methods and professional rights 
and duties. 

Ph 325 British Empiricists 1 (unit) 
Systematic study and critical analysis of the main works of 
Locke, Berkeley and Hume. Offered 1974-75. Not open to 
students who have taken Ph 225. 

Ph 326 Existentialism 1 (unit) 
The well-known European existentialists: Kierkegaard, Hei- 
degger, Gabriel Marcel, Camus, Sartre and Simone de Beau- 
voir. Selected readings from the novels, plays and philo- 
sophical essays of these writers. Choice of special investi- 
gation of existentialism in the United States or of comparison 
of existentialism and Buddhism (Heidegger and Zen, Marcel 
and Buddhism). 

Ph 330 Modern Rationalists 1 (unit) 
Systematic study and critical analysis of the main works of 
Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant and Hegel. Offered 1974- 
75. Not open to students who have taken Ph 226. 

Ph 336 Science and Mysticism: From Pascal to Teilhard 

1 (unit) 
The story, through modern philosophy to the present day, of 
the marriage of the two great antagonists: science and mys- 
ticism. Readings from Pascal, Auguste Comte, Boutroux, 
Bergson, and Teilhard de Chardin. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 340 Problems in Medieval Philosophy 1 (unit) 
A study of some of the major attempts to understand a) 
relations between: faith and reason, predestination and free 
will, the concept to the word and to the thing, the will to the 
intellect; b) proofs: for the existence of God, for the im- 
morality of the soul. Offered 1974—75. 

Ph 343 Philosophy of Language 1 (unit) 
A study of the nature and uses of language in order to de- 
velop a philosophical method of analysis. The use of the 
philosophical method based on a linguistic conception of 
philosophy to achieve results on such subjects as mind, be- 
havior, morals, understanding, certainty and belief. The 
decisive influence of Wittgenstein on current Anglo-American 
philosophy. 

Readings in the major works of Wittgenstein and important 
commentaries. Offered as a tutorial. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 344 Contemporary Analytic Philosophy 1 (unit) 
An intensive study of the important influence and key themes 



51 



of contemporary analytic philosophy. Symbolism, meaning 
and use, sign-using behavior, special types of discourse and 
conditions of knowledge. Readings in the major works of 
Russell, Moore, Wisdom, Anscombe, Ryle, Austin, Quine, 
Strawson, Malcolm and others. 

Ph 345 Far Eastern Philosophies 1 (unit) 
An introduction to the study of Far Eastern philosophies: the 
Analects of Confucius; the Tao-Te-Ching; the Upanishads; the 
Bhagavad Gita and critical works concerning them. Directed 
study of the following contemporary thinkers at the student's 
choice: Daisetz Suzuki (Zen Buddhism); Mahatma Ghandhi; 
Rabindranath Tagore. Offered 1974-75. 

Ph 347, 348 Seminar in Philosophy in Literature 

1, 1 (unit) 
An investigation of philosophical insights concerning the 
conduct and the condition of human life, as they appear in a 
selection of outstanding contemporary and classical literary 
works. Members of the seminar will participate in selecting 
a reading list. Since the emphasis will be predominantly on 
discussion, the seminar will require of its members a strong 
intellectual motivation and an active participation. 

Whenever possible this seminar will be conducted inter- 
departmentally. 

Ph 351 Philosophy of Creativity 1 (unit) 
An inquiry into the possibility of a new philosophy of man 
based on his essential creativity. The ways of developing 
and of experiencing in various ways the deeper awareness 
flowing from this. The possibility of creative communities. 
The ideas of Maslow, Gurdjieff, Alan Watts, Sartre, Aldous 
Huxley, Saint-Exupery, Suzuki, Jung, Thomas Wold, Kierke- 
gaard, Kazantzakis and Gabriel Marcel will be investigated. 
Not open to students who have taken PH 251. 

Ph 497, 498 Independent Study in Philosophy 

1/2-1- Va-l (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
instructor directing the study and as approved by the Chair- 
man and Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. (Please refer 
to policy on independent study.) 



Ph 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



In Newton's Romance Language Department, stu- 
dents from every major, as well as students concen- 
trating in languages, may acquire an indispensible 
tool for understanding the variety and richness of the 
cultures of other nations. Through developing a sym- 
pathy for nations not their own, students are able to 
see their own country in a new perspective and to 
appreciate the international dimensions of contem- 
porary problems. 

Students may learn effective communication and 
cultural understanding through the study of the lan- 
guages of France, Spain, Italy and Germany. With 
foreign-born instructors and a modern and well- 
equipped language laboratory, every opportunity is 
offered the student to speak the language or lan- 
guages of her choice with a fluency as nearly as pos- 
sible like that of a native speaker, and to write with 
grammatical correctness. 

Besides the regular programs on campus, the De- 
partment has organized Summer Institutes to be 
spent at specified centers abroad under the super- 
vision of the Department. Majors can also arrange 
to spend a semester of study abroad in programs run 
in cooperation with other major United States and 
foreign institutions. 

Many different career opportunities are open to 
those who specialize in languages, and the Depart- 
ment offers courses which prepare students for these 
professional careers. Through cooperation between 
the Romance Language Department and the Educa- 
tion Program students may obtain teacher's certifi- 
cation or may begin to qualify themselves for bilin- 
gual teaching or for teaching English as a second 



52 



language. Languages are important tools for the 
study of many other fields — Comparative Literature, 
English, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sci- 
ences, Urban Studies. 

Students interested in Romance Languages may 
major or minor in French or Spanish. They may com- 
bine the study of those two languages and they may 
supplement their programs through the courses 
offered in Italian and German. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

The requirements for the major in French or Spanish are: 

2 units in elementary courses or qualifying proficiency 
test 

2 units in intermediate courses or qualifying proficiency 
test 

8 upper-division courses with a grade of C or better 

Senior Project 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

The requirements for the minor in French or Spanish are: 

4 upper-division courses completed with a grade of C or 
better. 

COMBINED ROMANCE LANGUAGE MAJOR 

The requirements for the Combined Romance Language 
major are: 

a. Major Language 

2 units in elementary courses or qualifying proficiency 

test 

2 units in intermediate courses or qualifying proficiency 

test 

6 upper-division courses with a grade of C or better 

Senior Project 

b. Minor Language 

2 units in elementary courses or qualifying proficiency 

test 

2 units in intermediate courses or qualifying proficiency 

test 

4 upper-division courses with a grade of C or better 

Students are advised to visit with the professors of the De- 
partment of Romance Languages for more information on 



qualifying tests, courses offered abroad, senior projects and 
independent studies. 

RL 301-302 Introduction to Linguistics 1 (unit) 
Recommended to all Juniors and Seniors majoring in Ro- 
mance Languages. 

Historical and comparative study of major linguistic 
changes in the development of Modern European Languages: 
phonetics and phonology; principles of structural linguistics; 
survey of "new grammars"; semantics; etymology; theories 
on the philosophy and psychology of language. The course 
allows for special assignments in the individual target lan- 
guage or languages. 

This course carries upper-division credit for all Romance 
Language majors. 

RL 306 Teaching English as a Second Language 

1 (unit) 
Problems, methods and techniques related exclusively to the 
teaching of English as a Second Language will be the areas 
of study and discussion. Special emphasis will be given to: 
social and cultural implications; the immigrant and the psy- 
chology of learning; understanding anomie, orientation to 
group, phonetics, grammatical structure, language laboratory 
technique, textbooks and educational aids. Offered 1974-75. 

RL 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 

CP 305, 306, 307 Comparative Romance Literature 

1, 1, 1 (unit) 
Courses offered in Comparative Literature will carry upper- 
division credit for majors in languages, provided the reading 
and papers are done In the target language under the super- 
vision of the prospective language professor. 



FRENCH 

Fr 101 French I 1 (unit) 
For the beginner and the student with some or no previous 
knowledge of French. Three class sessions devoted to the 
acquisition of reading, writing and oral skills and two labora- 
tory sessions devoted to audio-oral practice. 

Fr 102 French 1! 1 (unit) 
This course is intended to develop the four skills of lan- 
guage: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Three 
class sessions will be devoted to grammar review, reading. 



53 



oral drills, dictations and discussions. Two laboratory ses- 
sions of aural-oral practice. 

Fr 205 Advanced Oral and Written French 1 (unit) 
Intensive course designed for students who wish to improve 
their conversational ability and their writing skill by training 
in the use of grammatical and idiomatic constructions. 

Fr 207-208 French III 1-1 (unit) 
Systematic and thorough review of French grammar through 
multiple and varied forms of literary composition as well as 
oral exercises. Creative writing in expository, narrative and 
descriptive forms will be required of the students. 

Fr 301 French Phonetics and Diction V2 (unit) 
Analysis of all French sounds and study of intonation, rhythm, 
accent and movement for the expressive reading of prose 
and poetry as well as a native-like pronunciation. Practical 
and systematical exercises in the language laboratory. 

Fr 302 French Advanced Conversation V2 (unit) 
This course is designed for third-year students who wish to 
improve their conversational ability. Class discussions, in- 
tensive training in the use of correct grammatical and idi- 
omatic constructions. 

Prerequisite: Fr 207-208 or upon recommendation of the 
instructor. 

Fr 303-304 Cultural History of France 1-1 (unit) 
A study of French historical and cultural background: geo- 
graphical aspects and growth of the arts, sciences and insti- 
tutions in France. 

Prerequisite: Fr 207-208. 

Fr 401^02 French Composition and Style 1-1 (unit) 
Course designed to give the advanced student a finer feeling 
for French style, a sense of shades of meaning and mastery 
of certain difficulties through oral and written "Explications 
de Textes," exercises in composition and translation. The 
technique of "Analyse Litteraire" and "Dissertation Lit- 
teraire." 

Fr 403 French Literature I 1 (unit) 
Historical and critical study of the literary trends of the novel, 
drama and poetry of outstanding authors of the twentieth 
century. Both intensive and extensive reading. Offered in 
1974-75. 

Fr 404 French Literature II 1 (unit) 



Study of the major works of the important poets, novelists 
and dramatists of the nineteenth century: Romanticism, 
Naturalism and Symbolism. Offered 1974-75. 

Fr 405 French Literature III 1 (unit) 
Eighteenth century or the Age of Enlightenment, with a stress 
on the changing concept of man and its influence on social 
and political thought in France. Extensive reading of works 
of Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau and Voltaire. 

Fr 406 French Literature IV 1 (unit) 
The elaboration, fixation and realization of the French Classic 
doctrine as seen through the prose and poetry of the seven- 
teenth-century French literature. Study of the most repre- 
sentative works of great poets, moralists, fabulists and mon- 
dain writers. 

Fr 407 Corneille, Racine, Moliere 1 (unit) 
The development of the classic theatre, new theories of the 
dramatic, the tragic and the comic. Thorough literary analy- 
sis of the dramatists' masterpieces. 

Fr 408 French Literature V 1 (unit) 
An historical and critical study of the main authors of the 
French literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance 
Period. Extensive outside reading. 

Fr 409 Modern French Drama 1 (unit) 
Discussion of plays from French theater since 1920 by 
Claudel, Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Montherlant, Sartre, 
Camus, as well as the most representative plays of the 
"avant-garde" theatre. 

Fr 411 Twentieth Century French Novel I 1 (unit) 
French novel in France from the beginning of the twentieth 
century to Sartre, through intensive reading of literary works 
by Barres, Gide, Proust and others. Offered in 1974-75. 

Fr 412 Twentieth Century French Novel II 1 (unit) 
The effects of changes in the philosophical and literary 
aesthetics in France as reflected in the works of Sartre, 
Camus, Beauvoir, G. Marcel. The "Nouveau Roman" and 
its search for new ways of expression. 

Fr 497, 498 Independent Study Vz-l- Vz-'^ (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed by the professor 
supervising the study and as approved by the Chairman of 



54 



the Department and the Division Director. The student must 
successfully carry through the project as outlined. It is only 
if the conditions are satisfied that the Independent Study 
will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 

Fr 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 
Courses offered in Comparative Literature which carry 
upper-division credit for majors in French are: 



OP 305, 306, 307 



Comparative Romance Literature 

1, 1, 1 (unit) 



SPANISH 



Sp 101-102 Elementary Spanish 1-1 (unit) 
For beginners or others not yet qualified to enter the inter- 
mediate course. Grounding in all four language skills: speak- 
ing, understanding, reading and writing as a preparation for 
subsequent courses conducted in the language. Three hours 
of class, one hour of laboratory. 

Sp 201-202 Intermediate Spanish 1-1 (unit) 
Review of the elements and further development of com- 
munication skills aimed at basic literacy. Meets three times 
a week. Students are encouraged to do individual work in 
the laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Sp 101-102 or equivalent skills in the lan- 
guage to be determined by a placement test. 

Sp 301-302 Advanced Oral and Written Spanish 

1-1 (unit) 
The purpose of this course is to strengthen the student's 
mastery of Spanish syntax and difficult grammatical prob- 
lems so that she may express herself correctly and accu- 
rately in expository writing. 

During the second semester students will be introduced 
to techniques of close literary analysis. Readings from 
Spanish American authors with a view to develop insight 
into their respective cultures. 

Prerequisite: Sp 202 or equivalent skills in the language 
to be determined by a placement test. Required of all 
Spanish majors. 



Sp 304 Spanish Cultural History V2 (unit) 
The course is not a survey of Spanish Literature, nor a 
course in civilization; rather, the study of specific literary, 
artistic, philosophical and historical documents which re- 
flect and interpret the development of Spanish culture and 
its mystique. Owing to the very nature of the course and 
its interdisciplinary aspects, the study of Spanish Cultural 
History will be approached through problem-solving-module 
techniques, lectures, guest speakers and classroom discus- 
sions. Conducted in Spanish. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 305 Latin American Civilization and Culture 

1/2 (unit) 
The purpose of this course is to give a general knowledge 
of the cultural background of Latin America as a means to 
reach an understanding of some of its contemporary prob- 
lems. Workshops examining attitudinal and value-clarifica- 
tion involved in bi-cultural study are an essential part of this 
course. 

Sp 306 Spanish Theatre of the Twentieth Century: 
1898-1936 1 (unit) 
Intensive study of the works of Unamuno, Azorin, Lorca, 
Grau, Hermanos Machado, etc., with special emphasis on 
the elements of existentialism, social protest and dramatic 
experimentation. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 308 Contemporary Spanish Theatre 1 (unit) 
A study of the most important works of Casona, Buero 
Vallejo, Sastre, Paso and others, as a reflection of some of 
the social problems of contemporary Spain. 

Sp 401 Spanish Literature I 1 (unit) 
This course will deal with the development of the novel in 
Spanish America, concentration on the major themes of man 
against nature, man against society, etc. In the last four 
weeks, special emphasis will be made on the writers of the 
"boom" generation. Conducted in Spanish. Offered 1974- 
75. 

Sp 402 Spanish Literature I 1 (unit) 
Contemporary twentieth century Spanish fiction will be 
studied. The literary trends and the works of significant 
writers of post-Civil War Spain will be discussed. Conducted 
in Spanish. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 403 Spanish Literature II 1 (unit) 
The ideological and literary contributions of the authors of 



55 



the generation of 1898. Unamuno, Azorin, Baroja, Valle- 
Inclan and others will be treated extensively. Conducted in 
Spanish. 

Sp 404 Spanish Literature II 1 (unit) 
The student will study in depth the novels of Perez Galdos, 
one of Spain's greatest novelists. Study of characterization, 
diction and techniques in £p/sod/os Nacionales, Novela £s- 
panola Contemporanes. Some of his plays will also be 
studied. Conducted in Spanish. 

Sp 405 Spanish Literature III 1 (unit) 
Reading and discussion of representative plays of Lope de 
Vega, Calderon and Tirso de Molina aimed at an understand- 
ing of the formation of the Spanish National Theatre. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 406 Spanish Literature III 1 (unit) 
A study of the development of prose in Spain during the 
Golden Centuries. Among other representative works. El 
Lazarillo de Tormes and Don Quijote de la Mancha will be 
studied and considered In the light of recent interpretations. 
Conducted in Spanish. 

Sp 407 Spanish Literature IV 1 (unit) 
The aim of the course during the first semester will be the 
presentation of Spanish lyric poetry of the XV, XVI, and XVII 
centuries as a continuous evolution of form and content. 
Representative works of Garcilaso, Herrera, Fray Luis de 
Leon and San Juan de la Cruz will be studied. Conducted 
in Spanish. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 408 Spanish Literature IV 1 (unit) 
The most significant trends in Spanish poetry and prose 
from the twelfth through the fifteenth centuries will be 
studied. Conducted In Spanish. Offered 1974-75. 

Sp 410 Spanish Seminar V2 (unit) 
In order to provide the student with a synthesizing experi- 
ence the Spanish Seminar will study genera! trends in 
Spanish literature and formulate conclusions. The professors 
of the department will collaborate in lecturing on various 
topics. 

Sp 497, 498 Independent Study Yz-l, V2-I (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters in 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 



professor directing the study and as approved by the De- 
partment Chairman and the Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only If these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. (Please refer 
to policy on independent study.) 

Sp 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 
Courses offered in Comparative Literature which carry 
upper-division credit for majors in Spanish are: 

CP 305, 306, 307 Comparative Romance Literature 

1, 1, 1 (unit) 



ITALIAN 

It 101-102 Elementary Italian 1-1 (unit) 
An introductory course to the study of Italian language 
through basic grammatical structures and conversational 
patterns. The aim of the course is to develop simultaneously 
aural comprehension, oral and written self-expression and 
reading ability. 

Methodology: Introduction to essentials of grammar by 
means of lectures, grammatical analysis, conversation and 
language laboratory. 

It 201-202 Intermediate Italian 1-1 (unit) 
The primary objective of this course is to consolidate pre- 
vious notions of Italian grammar and conversation into a 
functional linguistic unit. A review of basic elements of 
grammar will be integrated with reading of special texts, 
Italian newspapers and magazines. Fluency and correctness 
will be achieved through weekly language laboratory practice. 

Methodology: Introduction to advanced Italian grammar 
by means of explanatory lectures, analysis of grammar, con- 
versation and laboratory work. 

GERMAN 

German is not offered as either a major or a minor. Special 
courses for students who officially declared German as a 
major prior to 1973 will be provided in order that they may 
complete their major. 

Or 101-102 Elementary German 1-1 (unit) 
Three class sessions will be devoted to essentials of gram- 



56 



mar and the acquisition of reading and writing skills. In 
addition, one laboratory session of aural-oral practice. 

Gr 201-202 Intermediate German 1-1 (unit) 
This course aims at the further development of the four 
skills of language: understanding, speaking, reading and 
writing. Three class sessions will be devoted to reading and 
discussing works of literary merit and cultural interest and 
to a complete grammar review. In addition, one laboratory 
session of aural-oral practice. Course conducted primarily 
in German. 

Gr 301 German Conversation and Composition 1 (unit) 
This course is intended for the third-year German student. 
Its aim is the acquisition of a facility in both oral and written 
expression. Special emphasis is given to idioms and style. 
Oral and written reports on selected topics will be required. 

Gr 308 German Theatre after the Second World War 

1 (unit) 
Analysis of the turbulence in recent German drama. Con- 
sideration of works by Borchert, Brecht, Diirrenmatt, Frisch, 
Grass and others, as representative of the movements and 
reactions most significant in the post-war period. 

Gr 403-404 Contemporary German Literature 

1-1 (unit) 
Literary trends in Germany and Austria from 1885 to the 
present. Their relation to social, political and philosophical 
thought. Extensive reading. Conducted in German. 

Gr 412 German Seminar 1 (unit) 
Subject to be announced. Can be elected as Senior Project. 

Gr 497, 498 Independent Study V2-I. V2-I (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
supervising the study and as approved by the Chairman of 
the Department and the Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 

Gr 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 

57 



Division of 
Science and Mathematics 



Science 
Biology 
Chemistry 
l\1athematics 



SCIENCE 

Everyone in the last quarter of the twentieth century 
must be something of a scientist. For neither spe- 
cialist nor amateur Is science at Newton allowed to 
become an isolated experience. Both must be aware 
of the responsibilities and challenges of science in 
the world of today and of the future. 

Newton prepares specialists in biology. A core pro- 
gram of courses in the biological sciences provides 
the basic training necessary for the pursuit of careers 
in research, medicine, legal medicine, health related 
areas in general, and teaching. These are areas that 
our graduates are actively involved in today. Elec- 
tives in biochemistry, physiology, cellular biology, 
endocrinology, genetics, ecology and experimental 
biology round out the core offerings. 

The chemistry program provides courses in the 
fundamentals of chemistry as preparation for all sci- 
ence majors and pre-medical students. In addition, 
it offers those courses which will enable the chemistry 
major to enter graduate school or a career in chem- 
istry: industrial, clinical, environmental or forensic 
laboratory, basic or applied research laboratory, as 
well as teaching for those who complete the pre- 
scribed certification program. Students interested in 
patent law or medicine will find a chemistry major 
one of the best possible preparations in achieving 
their goals. 

Classes are small, innovative and well supervised. 
Research is encouraged early in a student's training 
at Newton. A pre-medical advisory committee pro- 
vides counsel to students on fulfilling requirements 
for medical schools. 



PRE-MEDICAL STUDIES 

A pre-medical student should make out her program in her 
Freshman year with the advice of the Director of the Division 



58 



of Science and Mathematics, and in accordance with the en- 
trance requirements of the medical school to which she 
intends to apply. In addition, a student in pre-medical 
studies must fulfill the requirements of any one major at 
Newton College. 

DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM— NEWTON COLLEGE and 
GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Newton College students have an opportunity to expand 
their career options by way of the dual-degree program with 
Georgia Institute of Technology. Participants in the program 
will spend three years at Newton College and two years at 
Georgia Tech. After completing the academic requirements 
of the two cooperative institutions, the student will be 
awarded a B.A. degree from Newton College and a bachelor's 
degree in engineering and other areas of technology from 
Georgia Tech. Qualified students could also move directly 
into the master's degree program at Georgia Tech, reducing 
the total amount of time necessary for that degree. 

Students interested in this program must make arrange- 
ments with the Director of Science and Mathematics at New- 
ton at the time of registration in the Freshman year. 

SCIENCE FOR THE NON-MAJOR 
Courses for the non-major stress the problems that science 
and technology can both create and help solve for society. 
As active citizens in their own communities, as professional 
women, as wives and mothers, all students will soon have 
to face and vote on such issues as population control, child 
rearing, drug abuse and use, pollution, violent behavior and 
poverty. Rhetoric and emotion are no substitute for scien- 
tific knowledge in these matters. Newton is very much con- 
cerned with making every one of its students scientifically 
literate. 

The courses especially developed for the non-major are 
among the most innovative to be found in the country. By 
title they include studies of: The Marine World, Scientific 
Basis of Social Issues, Scientific Concepts for the Respon- 
sible Citizen, Science and Public Policy, Science and the 
Law, Science and the Consumer, The Study of Reproduction 
and Introduction to Computing. 

Liberal Education courses offered in the Division are: 

LE 103, 104 Scientific Concepts for the Responsible 
Citizen V2. V^ (unit) 



LE 118 Man's Ideas about the Universe 1 (unit) 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS — Science for the non-major 

LE 103, 104 Scientific Concepts for the Responsible 
Citizen 1/2. Vz (unit) 
A course for students desirous of studying how the ideas of 
science affect their daily lives and relate to the future of man. 
Particular emphasis will be placed on a study of human re- 
production, human development, heredity and ecology. Two 
one-hour lectures, demonstrations and discussion. 

LE 118 Man's Ideas about the Universe 1 (unit) 
A study of how man's view of the universe evolved from 
ancient to modern times (concentrating on our modern day 
view of astrophysics and cosmology). Major topical areas 
would include: 1. How man observes the universe; 2. Birth 
and death of a star; 3. Cosmology. 

So 101, 102 Scientific Basis of Social Issues 

1, 1 (unit) 
Development of a core of basic biological concepts and a 
study of their application to current social problems. Lec- 
ture, discussion, laboratory and field work in local commu- 
nities. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 105 Science and Public Policy V^ (unit) 
The role of scientists as advisors to the government. The 
role of the government in support of science. Lectures, dis- 
cussions. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 106 Science and the Law V2 (unit) 
The protection of scientific discoveries, their patenting. How 
patents are issued, their exploitation. The role of science 
in law enforcement. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 108 The Marine World 1 (unit) 
The Marine World will be concerned with how the sea affects 
the generality of mankind and the experience of individuals 
in association with the sea. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 112 A Study of Reproduction 1 (unit) 
An interdisciplinary program concerned with the biological, 
sociological and psychological aspects of reproduction. The 
overall objective is to develop a thorough understanding of 
the reproductive biology of man through a review of some 
of the discoveries in technology and how such knowledge 
might affect the future of man. 



59 



There will be lectures, discussions, student seminars and 
laboratories. An independent research project may be pur- 
sued in lieu of laboratories. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 113 Foundations of Physics and Chemistry I 

1 (unit) 
This course is an experimental investigation of the properties 
of matter, methods of separating substances and laws of 
compound formation leading to the development of an 
atomic model. Experimental data acquired by the students 
is interpreted in class discussiDn. Throughout the course 
critical thinking and an understanding of the limitations of 
science are emphasized. This course is offered to freshman 
students as a basis for further study in science and as a 
foundation for scientific literacy for students whose principal 
interest is in other areas. Offered 1974-75. 

Sc 114 Foundations of Physics and Chemistry II 

1 (unit) 
A continuation of Sc 113 to include electric charge and its 
relation to an extension of the atomic model; and energy in 
its various forms, culminating in the law of conservation of 
energy. Prerequisite: Sc 113. 

SCIENCE MAJOR 

In addition to the Biology and Chemistry major, Newton 
offers a Science major. A Science major involves general 
study in biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics while 
leaving enough flexibility to allow the student to concentrate 
on one of several science specialties. 

BASIC CORE REQUIREMENTS 

1 year of Introductory Biology 

1 year of Introductory Chemistry 

1 year of Introductory Physics 

1 year of Mathematics (Calculus and Statistics) 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

Six additional units of electives in sciences and/or mathe- 
matics which will include two units of senior research in field 
of concentration. The areas of concentration are: Astronomy 
and Cosmology, Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Biomathe- 
matics, Developmental Biology, Ecology, General Science, 
Genetics, Nutrition and Reproductive Biology. 

A Senior advisor must be selected and approved by the 
Director of the Division of Science and Mathematics no later 



than the end of the first semester of the Junior year. The six 
units of electives should be discussed and approved by the 
Director of Science and Mathematics and/or the student's 
Science Advisor. 

SCIENCE COURSES FOR THE MAJOR 

Sc 201-202 Basic Physics I 1-1 (unit) 
This course will cover classical physics from mechanics 
through electromagnetism. During the course wave motion 
will be examined and modern physics will be discussed with 
an emphasis on the areas in which classical physics fails. 
It is imoortant that students have a solid grounding in clas- 
sical physics before attempting to understand modern 
physics. 

Prerequisite: Standard first year course in calculus. 

Sc 221 Human Nutrition: A Contemporary View 

1 (unit) 
The nutritional status of the average American and his beliefs 
and attitudes toward eating and food will be examined from 
a sociological, historical and scientific perspective. Funda- 
mental concepts in nutrition and food technology will be 
discussed along with a study of past and present "food- 
ways"; that is, those economic, social, religious and geo- 
graphic factors which influence what man eats, in order to 
evaluate present eating trends. 

The course will also focus attention on problem areas in 
nutrition such as obesity, diet-related diseases, the unin- 
formed consumer and malnutrition, both in the U.S. and 
abroad. 

The course is open to non-science majors and should be 
of interest to students who are contemplating a career in 
community nutrition. 

Sc 223 Microbiology: An Introduction to Bacteria and 

Viruses 1 (unit) 
This course will present an overview of the structural orga- 
nization and metabolism of bacteria and viruses. Emphasis 
will be placed on their environmental and biological relation- 
ships with special attention given to their role in disease, 
contamination of food and oncology. 

The course is open to science majors and others with the 
permission of the instructor. 

Sc 301 Basic Physics Ma 1 (unit) 
This course will complete classical physics concentrating on 
statistical physics and thermodynamics. Detailed analysis 



60 



of wave motion, physical optics and special relativity will be 
discussed. Offered 1974-75. 
Prerequisite: Sc 201, 202. 

Sc 302 Basic Physics lib 1 (unit) 
This course will introduce modern atomic physics and quan- 
tum mechanics with a detailed study of the hydrogen atom. 

Prerequisite: Sc 201, 202, 301 or at least one year of 
math above introductory calculus. 

Sc 322 Field Work In Comn?iunity Nutrition 1 (unit) 
This course offers an opportunity to apply classroom nutri- 
tional theory to the solution of day to day nutritional prob- 
lems encountered in the community. By observing and work- 
ing with professionals, the students will be able to learn, 
first hand, about the nutritional problems of special groups 
within the population such as the very young and the elderly, 
to understand the complexity of food service systems serving 
large populations, and participate in community based nu- 
trition education projects. In addition, students will acquire 
experience in designing dietary plans for individuals which 
not only meet their physiological needs but are compatible 
with their life style and "foodways." 

Prerequisite: Sc 221. 

Sc 324 Advanced Topics in Nutrition 1 (unit) 
This course'shall focus attention on topics in human nutri- 
tion which reflect current and sometimes controversial re- 
search findings. New theories regarding nutrition and ma- 
ternal and child health, recent data refuting the belief that 
milk is the "perfect food," the relation between dietary in- 
take and mental behavior, the physiological and psycho- 
logical components of obesity and controversial vitamins will 
be among the topics discussed in the course. 

Course requirements include attendance at all class meet- 
ings and the presentation of a current research topic to the 
class. 

Enrollment is open to Science majors and other students 
with the permission of the instructor. 

Sc 403, 404 Introduction to Astronomy and Astrophysics 

1 (unit) 
The following topics will be studied: 1. How we collect data 
about stars; 2. Theories of stellar evolution; 3. Theories about 
formation of galaxies; 4. Physical cosmology. Offered 1974- 
75. 



Prerequisite: Sc 201, 202, 301, 302 (or consent of in- 
structor). 

Sc 497,498 Independent Studies in Physics 1, 1 (unit) 
Possible topics for Independent Study are: Statistical Physics, 
Solid State Physics, Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Quantum 
Mechanics, Advanced Electricity and Magnetism, and Optics. 

Prerequisite: Sc 201, 202, 301, 302 (or consent of in- 
structor). 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the study as agreed to by the professor directing 
the study and as approved by the Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study should be carried in any one semester. 
(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

BIOLOGY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
The required Biology core program consists of Bi 201-202, 
Bi 203-204, Bi 301-302, Bi 303, Bi 305, Bi 404, Bi 409- 
410. At least one elective course must be taken from any 
of the biology offerings. Required related courses for majors: 
Oh 201-202, Ch 305-306, and Sc 201-202. It is strongly 
recommended that those students planning to go to medical 
or graduate school in science take a year of calculus (Ma 
201-202). Majors are required to complete a minimum of 
6 upper-division units with a grade of C or better beyond 
the Bi 201-202 level. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
Bi 201, 202 Cell to Organism 
Bi 301, 302 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis 
Bi 303 General Genetics 

Bi 404 Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS 

First Semester Second Semester 

Freshman Year Bi 201 Bi 202 

Bi 203 Bi 204 

Ch 201 Ch 202 

Ma 201 Ma 202 

Sophomore Year Bi 301 Bi 302 

Ch 305 Ch 306 



61 





Ch 307 


Ch 308 




Sc 201 


Sc 202 


Junior Year 


Bi 303 


Bi 404 




Bi 305 


Bi (elective) 


Senior Year 


Bi 409 


Bi 410 



Majors are to consult with the Director of the Division of 
Science and Mathematics for assignment to a permanent 
major advisor. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Bi 201-202 Cell to Organism 1-1 (unit) 
Study of the patterns of organization through which mole- 
cules, organelles, cells and tissues give organisms their basic 
properties. Fall semester: cell biology integrated with the 
elements of biochemistry and cell physiology. Spring semes- 
ter: principles of developmental biology, whereby the in- 
formation from genetic material is translated into form and 
function during the individual life spans of plants and 
animals. Lectures and discussion. 

Bi 203-204 Basic Laboratory Investigations — Cell to 
Organism V2-V2 (unit) 
This course introduces the beginning student to the basic 
laboratory techniques of Biology. Dissection, microscopy, 
biochemical analysis, vertebrate body structure and func- 
tion, histology and an introduction to systematics are em- 
phasized. 

Prerequisite: Bi 201-202 (may be taken concurrently). 

Bi 301-302 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis 

1-1 (unit) 
A comparative morphological and embryological study of the 
vertebrates. Evolutionary changes in vertebrate structure 
from the protochordates through representative members of 
all the vertebrate classes will be studied. Emphasis will be 
placed on understanding the underlying principles behind 
these morphogenetic events. Two lectures and two 3-hour 
laboratories. 

Bi 303 General Genetics 1 (unit) 
A study of the development of genetics from Mendel to the 
present. The central emphasis will be on the understanding 
of the molecular basis of heredity, the nature, transmission 
and action of the genetic material in microorganisms, plants 
and animals. Three lectures a week and discussions. 

Prerequisite: Bi 201-202. 



BI 304 Topics In Advanced Genetics 1 (unit) 
This course is designed as a seminar for students who wish 
to deepen their knowledge of some of the problems of 
genetic research today. Topics to be discussed will be se- 
lected from areas including genetics and development, 
genetics and behavior, genetics and evolution, genetic con- 
trol of photosynthesis, genetic approach to cancer. Each 
year will emphasize one of these areas. 

Bi 305 Histology 1 (unit) 
The microscopic anatomy of tissues as related to function. 
This will include classical methods of study as well as modern 
research techniques. Three lectures and one 2-hour labora- 
tory. 

Bi 306 Advanced Histological Technique 1 (unit) 
A laboratory-oriented course. Includes techniques used in 
investigation of problems in cell biology, photomicrography, 
tissue culture, phase contrast microscopy, cyrobiology, his- 
tochemical enzyme studies, exfoliative cytology and auto- 
radiography. 

'^I 307 Experimental Biology 1 (unit) 
A laboratory-oriented course concerned with selected basic 
methods, techniques and instruments used in experimental 
biology. 

BI 401-402 Experimental Techniques in Developmental 
Biology 1-1 (unit) 
The emphasis will be on learning varied experimental tech- 
niques used both in classical and modern investigations. 
A wide range of living material will be used, invertebrate 
and vertebrate. 

It is hoped that the student will get a vivid dynamic view 
of developmental processes and an insight into the basic 
nature of problems of development. 

Original papers will be used as a background for under- 
standing how these techniques have been applied to solve 
the most important problems in biology. 

Prerequisites: Bi 201-202, Bi 203-204, Bi 301-302. 

BI 404 Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology 1 (unit) 
A biochemical and biophysical approach to the cell as the 
biological common denominator. Includes cell physiology of 
both plants and animals. 

Bi 406 Vertebrate Physiology 1 (unit) 
A systematic approach to functions of organs and organ sys- 



62 



I 



terns in the vertebrates with special emphasis on regulatory 
mechanism and reproductive physiology. 

Bl 408 Endocrinology 1 (unit) 
A review of the general and comparative aspects of endoc- 
rinology. 

Bi 409-410 Senior Research 1-1 (unit) 
All students will present a senior paper on their research 
supervised by the staff. Seniors should consult with a faculty 
member concerning their thesis and submit an outline of the 
thesis to the Department for approval by the third Thursday 
in October. The outline should state the objective and how 
that objective will be accomplished. The outline should be 
signed by the faculty advisor. The Department will review 
the outline and recommend appropriate action. 

Bi 411 Introductory Ecology 1 (unit) 
First Semester yearly. Introduction to basic ecological con- 
cepts including nutrient cycling and energy flow through the 
ecosystem, basic population ecology and basic community 
ecology. Occasional (optional) weekend field trips. 

Prerequisite: A course in general biology. Recommended: 
a course in general chemistry. 

Bi 412 Population Biology 1 (unit) 

Second Semester Alternate Years. Introductory concepts of 
population biology with emphasis on the regulation of popu- 
lation size in natural populations. Partially seminar in nature, 
students will be introduced to the technical literature. 

Prerequisite: Bi 411, Introductory Ecology; competence 
in algebra. 

Bi 414 The Impact of Man on the Environment: An 
Ecological Approach 1 (unit) 
Second Semester Alternate Years. Four hours of lecture 
and/or laboratory/week. An ecologist's view of man-made 
problems of an environmental nature including overpopula- 
tion, pollution (air, water and sound), and the consequences 
of overuse of pesticides and nuclear "accidents." The effects 
of these on man and his environment will be discussed. 

Prerequisite: Bi 411: Introductory Ecology. 

Bi 497, 498 Independent Study 1, 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 



professor directing the study and as approved by the Division 
Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study should be carried in any one semester. 

(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

CHEMISTRY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
The required core of Chemistry courses is as follows: Ch 
201-202; Ch 301, Ch 303-304, Ch 305-306, Ch 401^02, 
and Ch 403-404 (Senior Project). 

Required related courses for majors: Sc 201-202, and 2 
units of mathematics including Ma 201 (202), 204 and one 
of the following: Ma 102, 203, 302, 311, 313. 

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR MAJORS 

First Semester Second Semester 

Freshman Year Ma 201 (Ma) 

Sc 201 Sc 202 

Ch 201 Ch 202 

Sophomore Year (Ma) (Ma) 

Ch 305 Ch 306 

Junior Year Ch 303 Ch 304 

Ch 301 (Bi 404) 

Senior Year Ch 401 Ch 402 

Ch 403 Ch 404 

The senior year, class work represents the senior compre- 
hensive synthesis replacing a formal "senior project." It 
offers flexibility through choice of topics. A grade of C or 
better is required for courses 301 and above. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
Ch 201, 202 Introductory Inorganic and Physical 

Chemistry 
Ch 301 Physical Methods of Analysis 

or 
Ch 497 or 498 Independent Study 
Ch 305, 306 Organic Chemistry 
Ch 307, 308 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Ch 201 Introductory Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 

1 (unit) 



63 



The fundamental laws of chemistry; properties of solids, 
liquids, and gases; atomic and molecular structure, with ap- 
plication to inorganic compounds. Three 1-hour lectures and 
one 3-hour laboratory. 

Ch 202 Introductory Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 

1 (unit) 
Introduction to kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry. 
A detailed treatment of equilibria in aqueous solution, with 
applications to quantitative volumetric, gravimetric and spec- 
trophotometric analysis. Three 1-hour lectures and one 
3-hour laboratory. 

Ch 301 Physical Methods of Analysis 1 (unit) 
Theory and technique of chromatographic, spectrometric, 
electrochemical and other methods of analysis. Each student 
will be expected to apply these methods to the investigation 
of a particular problem. Two hours of lecture, and one 
4-hour laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Ch 201-202, Ch 305-306. 

Ch 303 Physical Chemistry I 1 (unit) 
A study of thermodynamic laws and their application to 
chemical systems. A presentation of the theoretical bases 
of spectroscopic methods, diffraction methods, and dipole 
and magnetic properties, with their application to the experi- 
mental study of molecular structure. An introduction to 
quantum mechanics, atomic structure, the chemical bond. 
Three one-hour meetings of lecture and discussion. 

Prerequisites: Ch 201-202 and at least one unit of cal- 
culus. 

Ch 304 Physical Chemistry II 1 (unit) 
A study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. 
The thermodynamics of solutions of electrolytes and non- 
electrolytes. A detailed treatment of the electrochemical 
process. Three one-hour meetings of lecture and discussion. 

Prerequisites: Ch 201-202 and at least one unit of cal- 
culus. 

Ch 305 Organic Chemistry I 1 (unit) 
A study of the bonding in organic molecules and the relation- 
ship of bonding and reactivity. Three lecture hours and one 
4-hour laboratory. 

Ch 306 Organic Chemistry II 1 (unit) 
A continuation of the topics covered in first semester, with 
the emphasis on the chemistry of functional groups and 



synthetic methods. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour 
laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Ch 305. 

Ch 307, 308 Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
1/2, 1/2 (unit) 
This course constitutes the "practical" component of the 
Organic Chemistry Course 305, 306. The stress will be on 
Modern Synthetic Methods with development of expertise in 
running reactions and identifying unknowns. One 4-hour 
laboratory. 

Ch 401 Advanced Organic Chemistry 1 (unit) 
A seminar presentation required of senior chemistry majors. 

The topics covered will be: analysis of spectral data (I.R., 
NMR, and Mass Spectra) along with a study of selected re- 
action mechanisms. The students will be expected to 
research the literature and present a seminar to the class. 

Prerequisites: Ch 305 and 306. 

Ch 402 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 1 (unit) 
Topics in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry include: the funda- 
mentals of quantum chemistry, molecular orbital calcula- 
tions, structures and reactions of inorganic compounds, and 
the symmetry properties of coordination complexes. Three 
hours of lectures. 

Ch 403-404 Senior Research O-I/2-I, O-V2-I (unit) 
A project of an independent nature which may include labo- 
ratory research, literature research and/or field work. 

Ch 497-498 Independent Study 1/2. 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
directing the study and as approved by the Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study should be carried in any one semester. 

(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics courses offer a solid core of the mathe- 
matics required for undergraduate students to be successful 
in a large variety of career goals. Today a quantitative 
approach to the natural and social sciences is of prime 
importance. In conjunction with guidelines suggested by the 



64 



Committee on the College Undergraduate Programs in Mathe- 
matics, Newton offers a core program which includes a pre- 
calculus course, one year of calculus, linear algebra, proba- 
bility and statistics, and in addition a time-sharing computer 
capability which is thoroughly interwoven into this basic 
core. In each core course listed there will be many applica- 
tions; these applications will be carefully chosen to reflect 
both the interests of the students and the interaction be- 
tween mathematics and the real world. At an advanced 
level of mathematical competence, both theory and applied 
courses are available. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

2V2 units in courses at the upper-division level (courses 
numbered above 300) or their equivalent. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS COMPLETING 
DEGREE WORK 

The contents of Ma 301, Ma 303, Ma 304, Ma 307 plus 4 
units (or their equivalent) in courses at the upper-division 
level (courses numbered above 300). 

Any course listed below is open to any qualified student. 

Ma 101, 102 Introduction to Computing V2. V2 (unit) 
This is a standard first course in computing which covers 
the task of acquainting the student with the basic character- 
istics and properties of computers and which also includes 
problem solving by computer. 

Ma 103, 104 Basic Applied Mathematics V2' Vz (unit) 
The main topics covered in this course will be functions — 
ways of describing them, examples from the students' pre- 
vious experience and from the real world; graphing; some 
preparation for probability. This course gives more than 
adequate preparation for calculus. 

Ma 201, 202 Initiation in Calculus V^, Yz (unit) 
This course presents the main ideas, definitions and skills 
of calculus in lectures and/or discussions. Ideas will be 
introduced through examples from real life situations and 
from the interests of the class. Individual student projects 
will make up an important part of the course; these projects 
normally will relate calculus to some subject in their own 
range of interest. Among the topics covered are sequences, 
continuity, derivatives, integral and differential equations. 

Prerequisite: Ma 103. 



Ma 203 Probability and Statistics 1 (unit) 
This course presents the main ideas and skills of mathe- 
matical probability and statistics in the context of applied 
problems. Upon completion the student will be able to use 
and to understand the use of statistics, probability and cal- 
culating machines in solving certain real life problems. 

Prerequisite: Ma 103. 

Ma 204 intermediate Calculus 1 (unit) 
This calculus course features many illustrative examples 
selected from areas of interest to the students in the class. 
In fact, it is hoped that each student will have completely 
answered the natural question — why should I learn calculus? 
Topics include derivatives and extreme value problems; area 
and integral; vectors in three dimensions. Computers and 
calculating machines will be used as deemed appropriate. 

Prerequisite: Ma 101 or 102. 

Ma 301 Algebra V2 (unit) 
Elementary theory of Groups, Rings, and Fields. Offered 
1974-75. 

Ma 302 Mathematical Analysis V2 (unit) 
This course gives the basic topics and skills needed for ad- 
vanced work in such fields of analysis as differential equa- 
tions, calculus of variations, harmonic analysis, complex 
variables and probability theory. A lecture treatment of the 
ideas will often be sacrificed here in favor of developing the 
problem-solving ability of the student. 

Prerequisite: Ma 204. 

Ma 303 Advanced Calculus V2 (unit) 
Elementary point-set topology and functions of several vari- 
ables. Offered 1974-75. 

Ma 304 Applications of Algebra in Analysis V^ (unit) 
A study showing the uses in analysis of main ideas in alge- 
bra. Offered 1974-75. 

Ma 305 Mathematical Statistics V2 (unit) 
A course which covers the main ideas and problems in 
statistics. Offered 1974-75. 

Ma 306 Selected Topics in Mathematics 1 (unit) 
The content of this course will depend on the interests of 
the students and will be based on the first semester's work. 
For example, a more detailed study of mathematical sta- 
tistics may be appropriate. Offered 1974-75. 



65 



Ma 307 Linear Algebra 1 (unit) 
A study of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, 
systems of linear equations, operators on Euclidean spaces 
and applications to linear differential equations. 

Ma 308 Numerical-Computation and Problem Solving 

1 (unit) 
This computer course will include the following topics: the 
solution of linear and non-linear systems of equations, inter- 
polation, approximation and linear programming. Offered 
1974-75. 

Ma 310 Management Science with Applications to Ex- 
ecutive Decisions V2 (unit) 
This is a course of mathematical model building in a busi- 
ness setting, and no knowledge of business administration 
or economics is assumed. Topics include linear, dynamic 
and stochastic programming. There will be a broad selec- 
tion of exercises ranging from computational to building 
models. Justification of results will be mostly heuristic but 
some proofs will be provided. 

Prerequisite: Ma 204. 

Ma 311 Applied Linear Algebra V2 (unit) 
The widely applicable material in this course will be devel- 
oped with the students' need for relevant examples and with 
the students' geometric intuition in mind. Topics include 
linear equations and matrices; determinants; vector cross 
product; vector dot product. These topics will be presented 
with the idea of using the computer wherever possible. 

Prerequisite: Ma 204. 

Ma 313 Linear Programming Models V2 (unit) 
The course will begin with the ideas entailed in mathemati- 
cal modeling and model building and then proceed to the 
construction of linear programming models, the idea of algo- 
rithm and the so-called "simplex method." The usefulness 
of linear programming models rests on the fact that the re- 
sulting mathematical problem can be efficiently solved. Thus, 
knowledge of computing will be increasingly important as the 
course goes along. 

Prerequisite: Ma 204. 

Ma 314 Mathematical Model Building V^ (unit) 
This course will begin with the ideas involved in constructing 
mathematical models for real life situations and then con- 
sider in detail several specific models. The models will be 



chosen from a variety of fields including the biological and 
behavioral sciences. 
Prerequisite: Ma 204. 

Ma 321 Topology 1/2 (unit) 
This course is designed for sophomores, juniors and seniors 
who have completed a year of calculus. It is recommended 
for mathematics majors and prospective secondary school 
teachers. Topics include classification of surfaces, topologi- 
cal invariants and topological mappings. 

Ma 497, 498 Independent Study in Mathematics 

1/2-1, V2-I (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor directing the study and as approved by the Division 
Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study should be carried in any one semester. 
(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 



66 



Division of 
Social Sciences and Religion 



Economics 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Religion 
Sociology 
Urban Studies 



ECONOMICS 



The study of Economics is a relevant and essential 
tool for the student of world affairs as it is the exami- 
nation of the interaction and cooperation between 
individuals and groups. The subject matter deals 
with the scarcity of resources and their allocation to 
satisfy human wants. Central to the solving of many 
contemporary problems is an understanding, in eco- 
nomic terms, of unemployment, inflation, urban re- 
newal, poverty, rent control, the cost of pollution and 
the population explosion. 

As a scholarly discipline. Economics is only two 
centuries old; however, since its founding, man has 
so enormously increased his capacity to provide 
goods and services that he has, in doing so, altered 
the basic fabric of society. In the vast industrial 
complex which has resulted, man must find ways to 
manage effectively what he has created. 

Newton's Department of Economics assumes that 
the student must understand the nature and organi- 
zation of society and the bases of great economic 
issues before she can evaluate and attempt to solve 
current economic problems. The curriculum, there- 
fore, consists of a core of basic economic theory from 
which logical analysis, based on principles, proceeds. 

The student is motivated to question and reflect 
upon real world problems and to apply theory in the 
decision-making process. The Department offers 
courses in theoretical and applied economics and 
encourages related study. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

The major in Economics comprises a minimum of twelve (12) 

courses: 

Economic Principles and Problems: LE 161 and 162. 

Quantitative Analysis: Ec 207 and 306. 

Economic Theory: 



67 



Intermediate Theory: Ec 301 and 302. 

Advanced Theory: Ec 401 and 402. 
Ec 405 and three courses in the student's selected fieid(s) 
of concentration. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

A minor in economics presents a minimum of five (5) 
courses. In addition to LE 161, 162 the minor is comprised 
of either Ec 301, or Ec 302 and two (2) Department electives 
for a minimum of five (5) courses. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

(a) Economic Theory: 

Ec 401 Advanced Macro-Theory Seminar. 
Ec 402 Advanced Micro-Theory Seminar, Ec 474 Indus- 
trial Organization 

(b) International Trade and Economic Development: 

Ec 365 Money and Banking, Ec 386 Economic Develop- 
ment, Ec 391 International Economics. 

(c) Urban Economics: 

Ec 371 Labor Economics and Problems, Ec 376 Human 

Resource Development, 

Ec 462 Urban Economics: Principles and Problems. 

(d) Banking and Finance: 

Ec 365 Money and Banking, Ec 466 Public Finance. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Economic Principles and Problems I, II 

These courses relate to many of our contemporary society's 
economic problems. They are designed to introduce the stu- 
dent to the methodology of modern economic analysis. 

Through the development of modern economic theory and 
the application of economic policies, the course will demon- 
strate how a mixed capitalistic economy, such as that of the 
United States, attempts to solve its economic problems. 
Together the courses are comprehensive in scope in that 
they analyze the economy at both the micro-economic 
(household, firm) and macro-economic (aggregative) levels. 

LE 161 Micro-Economic Principles and Problems I 

1 (unit) 
Development of the modern price system and market struc- 
ture. How a free market society allocates its limited produc- 



tive resources to produce the millions of goods the con- 
sumers want to buy. Study of the determination of product 
prices and factor prices, e.g. wages, under both competitive 
and monopolistic conditions. Applications of supply and 
demand analysis to such contemporary economic problems 
as agriculture, urban rent controls, the distribution of in- 
comes. 

LE 162 Macro-Economic Principles and Problems II 

1 (unit) 
Introduction to the modern theory of income and employ- 
ment. How the aggregate level of output, employment and 
income is determined in a capitalistic mixed economy. The 
role of modern government in attempting to stabilize the 
economy at high levels of employment and output through 
monetary and fiscal policy. Contemporary problems and 
policy concerning inflation, unemployment and the interna- 
tional balance of payments. 

Ec 207 Introduction to Mathematical Economics 

1 (unit) 
A course designed to provide knowledge of the mathematical 
techniques used in modern economics. The topics will in- 
clude integration and differentiation with applications in the 
theories of the firm and consumer behavior, macro-economic 
models. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 253 Accounting Principles 1 (unit) 

Organization and analysis of financial transactions, construc- 
tion and interpretation of financial statements. Offered 
1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 301 Micro-Economic Analysis 1 (unit) 
Contemporary value and distribution theory. Theories of 
consumer and firm behavior under various market condi- 
tions. Integration of price and distribution theory with wel- 
fare and efficiency in both public and private markets. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 302 Macro-Economic Analysis 1 (unit) 
Foundations of modern income and employment theory. De- 
velopment and analysis of the classical system with the 
modern income and expenditure approach. Recent monetary 
and fiscal policy effectiveness in achieving stability in income, 
output, employment and the price level. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 



68 



Ec 306 Economic Statistics 1 (unit) 
A first course in statistical methiods as applied to economics. 
Topics include: descriptive statistics, time series analysis, 
index numbers, correlation and an introduction to regression 
analysis. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 365 Money and Banking 1 (unit) 
A study of thie history of banking. Analysis of deposit cre- 
ation and central banking witii application to objectives and 
effectiveness of modern monetary policy. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 371 Labor Economics and Problems 1 (unit) 
Theory of wages and employment. The study of institutional 
factors affecting wage determination, income distribution and 
the efficient use of labor resources; the development of trade 
unionism and collective bargaining. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 376 Human Resource Development 1 (unit) 
An economic analysis of the role of human capital in the 
American economy viewing all levels of education as an in- 
vestment. Critically analyzes manpower policy in the United 
States with specific reference to current problems and mi- 
nority groups. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 385 Economic Development 1 (unit) 
Theoretical examination of structural changes associated 
with the process of economic development; special reference 
to poor countries and analysis of criteria for policy judg- 
ments in development planning. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 391 International Economics 1 (unit) 
Fundamentals of international trade, international monetary 
system and selected topics involving international liquidity 
and adjustment mechanism. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 401 Advanced Macro-Theory Seminar 1 (unit) 
Reading and analysis of selected topics in contemporary 
aggregative, economic analysis. 

Prerequisite: Ec 302 and senior standing. 



Ec 402 Advanced Micro-Theory Seminar 1 (unit) 
Reading and analysis of selected topics in contemporary 
developments in the theory of the firm. 

Prerequisite: Ec 301 and senior standing. 

Ec 405 History of Economic Thought 1 (unit) 
Traces development of economic theory from the classical 
to the modern period. Attention is given to historical eco- 
nomics, institutional economics, national income economics 
and the American economic school. Enrollment limited to 
seniors. 

Ec 456 Corporate Finance 1 (unit) 
Introduction to financial management of modern business. 
Analysis of financial statements, capital budgeting and other 
management evaluation principles. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 462 Urban Economics: Principles and Problems 

1 (unit) 
Examination of the urban complex, its origins, problems and 
future. Emphasis on such topics as housing, discrimination, 
transportation and decline of the central city. Offered 1974- 
75. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 465 Public Finance 1 (unit) 
Taxation at federal, state and municipal level from equity 
and efficiency standpoints. 

Prerequisite: LE 161, 162. 

Ec 474 Industrial Organization 1 (unit) 
Economic analysis of American industry in terms of market 
structure, conduct and performance. Topics included are 
business organization, concentration, barriers to entry, price 
and product policies, profits and efficiency. Offered 1974-75. 

Prerequisite: Ec 301. 

Ec 497, 498 Independent Study in Economics 

1, 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
directing the study and as approved by the Department 
Chairman and Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 



69 



Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study course should be carried in any one semes- 
ter. (Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

Ec 499 Senior Project 

Required of all majors. Usually completed in Senior year. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The objective of the department is to aid the students 
in gaining an understanding of human political com- 
munities and to prepare them in becoming informed 
and responsible participants in the life of such com- 
munities. Political science at Newton prepares stu- 
dents for the practice of politics while emphasizing 
the fact that one can practice politics more effectively 
if one understands its theory. Moreover, on the con- 
temporary scene, it is essential to understand politics 
on the international as well as the national level. 
Courses are available in political thought, political 
theory and political sociology; in international rela- 
tions; in international law and organization; in Ameri- 
can and foreign political systems. Students are ex- 
posed to diversified approaches ranging from the 
philosophical and historical to the legal, comparative 
and empirical. 

The program is sufficiently flexible to provide gen- 
eral training in the discipline and more specialized 
training in the fields in which the student has a par- 
ticular interest. Although majors will find themselves 
ready to enter schools of graduate or professional 
study in political science, it is also possible for non- 
majors to equip themselves for active work in govern- 
ment service, for staff work in political campaigns, 
for foreign service, and — most important of all — for 
an intelligent contribution as citizens to decision- 
making in the contemporary political process. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Majors must receive a grade of C or higher in both semesters 
of the pre-major course PS 251-252 Patterns of Political and 
Social Thought as well as in at least 10 upper-division units 
in Political Science. These must include at least two units 
from each of the following areas: American (A); Interna- 
tional (B); Theory and Thought (C). The required units in 
each area must be selected from the courses labeled either 
(A) or (B) or (C). Majors must also submit an acceptable 
Senior Project. Close consultation with the Chairman of the 
Department is strongly urged for any student intending to 
pursue graduate study. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

The minimal requirements for minors in Political Science 
consist of six units of upper-division courses in Political Sci- 
ence equally distributed among the above mentioned areas. 
All courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher. 

PS 101 The Political Man 1 (unit) 
An inquiry into the political dimensions, structures and 
viable alternatives in the contemporary world through the 
study of selected issues in the history of ideas. Offered in 
1974-75. 

PS 102 Political Analysis 1 (unit) 
A study of the science and art of political analysis as applied 
to the investigation of selected contemporary issues. The 
problems of testing of propositions against the data of ex- 
perience by observation, classification and measurements. 
Offered in 1974-75. 

LE 175-176 History of Political Ideas 1-1 (unit) 
An inquiry into the socio-cultural, philosophical and personal 
sources of politically significant thought patterns as vehicles 
for self-interpretation of society and man and as vehicles for 
sociopolitical change: from Near East, Hebrew and Greek 
origins to the present ideological spectrum. Concentration 
on representative thinkers against their socio-cultural back- 
ground and within the perspective of their contemporary 
significance. 

LE 177-178 Comparative Politics 1-1 (unit) 
A comparative analysis of political patterns and systems 
selected from the West European, Soviet and Asian areas; 
France, Great Britain, West Germany and the USSR; Japan, 



70 



India, China, 
considered. 



IVIajor issues in the politics of the countries 



LE 179-180 Politics and Policies of American 
Government 1-1 (unit) 
The actual operation, in its political and institutional setting, 
of federal, state and local government will be considered. 
Within the first semester, attention will be focused on the 
national campaign, the national election, parties, public 
opinion and pressure groups, the presidency, federal courts 
and civil rights. In the second semester, the following topics 
will be treated: powers of Congress, the states and their 
declining role, urbanization, local government, crime and 
court reform, judicial problems. 

PS 251-252 Patterns of Political and Social Thought 

l-I (unit) 
An exploration of the genesis and structures of significant 
political ideas and thought patterns operative now and in- 
corporated in the contemporary socio-political, intellectual 
and ideological constellations and processes. Concentration 
on representative classics and their contemporary counter- 
parts. Required of all political science majors. 

PS 302 Practical Politics: Nuts and Bolts 1 (unit) (A) 
An intensive analysis of the numerous and often detailed 
problems of practical politics by examining the "why" and 
"how" of political actions. Emphasis is placed on how one 
may become or support a successful candidate for elective 
office on the national, state or local level. Through reading 
and research each student will examine subjects such as 
campaign organization, fund raising, volunteers, research, 
publicity, media, polling, canvassing, election day procedure, 
etc. A research paper, including in-depth voting and demo- 
graphic analyses, is required. Personal involvement in politi- 
cal campaign is encouraged. 

PS 306 State and Local Government in the United States 

1 (unit) (A) 
The course is designed to describe and analyze the regular 
routine operations of the State, County, Town and City Sover- 
eign Agencies under actual conditions. Specific attention 
will be directed to the following topics: State constitutions. 
State Constitutional conventions. Amending procedures, Gov- 
ernorship, Governor as Administrator, Fiscal Policy, etc. 

PS 308 Public Administration 1 (unit) 
The course is designed to describe, analyze and evaluate the 



theory and practice inherent in the Organization and Man- 
agement of Governmental Bodies. It deals with shaping and 
controlling of Public Agencies, specifically with topics such 
as Organization, Bureaucracy, etc. Offered in 1974-75. 

PS 315 The Modern Presidency: A Biography 

1 (unit) (A) 
The course will examine the Presidential Office descriptively 
and analytically in terms of the lives and careers of selected 
men who shaped the office. Specific attention will be di- 
rected to Primaries, Campaigns, Elections, the uses of the 
Presidency as a Multiple Office, etc. 

PS 321 American Political Thought V2 (unit) 
An examination of American political thought, considered 
historically, and its consequent responsibility for the dis- 
location and disequilibrium of the American political system. 

PS 324 Race Relations in America V2 (unit) 
Analysis of the political, social, cultural and economic factors 
underlying contemporary race relations and an examination 
of attempts to resolve racial problems. 

PS 325, 326 Urban Practicum 1, 1 (unit) 
Involvement in an urban office or agency, governmental or 
private, to study in the broadest sense some aspect of an 
urban problem under the direction of the Archdiocesan Plan- 
ning Office. Enrollment in the course, type of work, hours 
and place to be arranged with the instructor. Ordinarily, 
only one semester may be taken for credit. 

PS 327 Development of American Law i^ (unit) 
The development and role of American law in determining 
priorities. The interaction of economics, politics and law, 
considered historically, in ordering these priorities. Possi- 
bilities for change in American law. Offered in 1974-75. 

PS 328 Civil Rights and Liberties V2 (unit) 
The rise and decline under the American legal system of 
basic freedoms such as speech, assembly, religion, the vote, 
association, privacy. The attempt and failure to legislate 
loyalty and compel one to service in war. Offered in 1974- 
75. 

PS 331 American Government and Politics: Institutions 
and Behavior 1 (unit) (A) 
Functions and powers of national political institutions. Em- 
phasis on roles and behavior of the political actors involved 
in each institution. 



71 



PS 332 American Government and Politics: Tlie Policy 
Process 1 (unit) (A) 
Concentration on public policy formulation in American na- 
tional government, and its relationship with public and pri- 
vate groups. Various models used in the study of policy 
will be presented and tested. 

PS 333 American Political Parties 1 (unit) (A) 
Role and functions of political parties in American Govern- 
ment and society; party composition and organization; 
process of nomination and policy formulation; regulation of 
party organization and activities and financing. 

PS 335 Public Opinion 1 (unit) (C) 
Structure and sources of contemporary public opinion and 
belief systems. Special attention to public opinion polling, 
social characteristics of the population, influence of mass 
communication media, the role of attitudes and attitude 
change. 

PS 338 Urban Government and Politics 1 (unit) 
Urban political institutions and environment analyzed with 
emphasis on political style, community power and policy con- 
cerns such as education, public health and welfare, housing 
and urban renewal, mass transportation, public works and 
utilities, law and order. Included will be an introduction to 
comparative politics of urban governments outside the United 
States. 

PS 345-346 International Relations 1-1 (unit) (B) 
An analysis of international relations in the contemporary 
environment with emphasis on the principal forms of con- 
flict in the modern international system and approaches to 
conflict resolution. 

PS 347 International Law 1 (unit) (B) 
An examination of the nature and scope of international law, 
its uses in international politics and its development in a 
restless world. 

PS 351 Political Development of International 
Communities 1 (unit) (B) 
A study of community formation in the international system 
with special attention given to the Western European Com- 
munity, its relation with the world and its process of integra- 
tion with areas of tensions and conflicts. Offered in 1974-75. 



PS 356 Quantitative Analysis In Political and Social 
Research 1 (unit) (C) 
Presentation of major models and approaches to modern 
political, social and socio-psychological research. Survey re- 
search, statistical analysis and data processing techniques. 

PS 359 Politics and American Society 1 (unit) (C) 
Analysis of the effects of politics on stability and change in 
American society. Attention to symbolic politics, policy de- 
termination, political agendas, belief systems, changing 
political eras, the post-industrial society, its organization and 
technology. Offered in 1974-75. 

PS 402 Seminar in the United Nations 1 (unit) 
A study of current issues before the main organs of the 
United Nations involving the preparation of draft resolutions 
for presentation to the National Model United Nations. Stu- 
dents will serve as delegates from a selected country to the 
NMUN. Although the bulk of the work is to be done in the 
second semester, pre-registration and preliminary work for 
this course will have to be made in the first semester. 

PS 445 Political Imagination and Planning 1 (unit) (C) 
A comparative study of selected Utopian and dystopian imagi- 
nations, their analysis in view of their possible relevance for 
planning, futurology and the think tanks. The problems of 
projecting the present against that of creation of new po- 
litical reality. Issues in political psychology. 

PS 446 The Pathology of Politics 1 (unit) (C) 
A comparative study of the functionality and dysfunctionality 
of violence, war, treason, corruption, secrecy, espionage and 
lies in political practice and political theory. The issue of 
the relation of politics to ethics. 

PS 447-448 Political Philosophy 1-1 (unit) (C) 
An inquiry into the philosophical foundations and formula- 
tions of contemporary political activism, their consequences 
and the nature of their aspiration. Questions of political 
anthropology and methodology both in the empirical and 
normative perspective. Special attention to the works of 
Voegelin and H. Arendt, as well as to selections from political 
literature. Offered in 1974-75. 

PS 452 Political Theory Seminar 1 (unit) (C) 
Selected topics in contemporary empirical and normative 
political theory to be announced. 



72 



PS 453 Seminar in Religious institutions and the Politics 
of Social Change: Suburban 1 (unit) 
Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific churches and synagogues respond 
to social issues. Participants will be asked to analyze the 
socio-political and religious profile of a particular church or 
synagogue and to assess the dynamics of response within 
that institution. Emphasis on the formulation of major ques- 
tions and on the development of observation techniques by 
seminar participants themselves. Bi-weekly meetings. Same 
as Re 453. 

PS 455 Seminar in Religious Institutions and the Politics 
of Social Change: Urban 1 (unit) 
Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific religious institutions and/or groups 
(for example: the Metropolitan Ministries; the Planning Office 
for Urban Affairs of the Archdiocese of Boston; the East 
Boston Collaborative; etc.) respond to social issues in terms 
of programs initiated and implemented. Participants will be 
asked to analyze the structure, the goals and the dynamics 
of the particular institution and/or group in order to assess 
the effectiveness of its responses. Emphasis on the formula- 
tion of major questions and on the development of observa- 
tion techniques by seminar participants themselves. Bi- 
weekly meetings. Same as Re 455. Offered in 1974-75. 

PS 497, 498 Independent Study in Political Science 

1/2-1. ¥2-1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the study as agreed to by the professor directing the 
study and as approved by the Department Chairman and the 
Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study should be carried in any one semester. 
(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

PS 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 
Required of all Political Science majors. 

The following courses may be applied toward a major or 
minor in Political Science: 



Hi 375-376 U.S. Diplomacy to 1914 — U.S. Diplomatic 
History Since 1914 1-1 (unit) (A) 
See History Section for description. 

Hi 379 American Constitutional Development 

1 (unit) (A) 
See History Section for description. 

Other units may be applied toward the major with specific 
and individual approval of the Chairman. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

The Psychology Department, while fundamentally hu- 
manistic in approach, emphasizes sound method- 
ological training. It is arranged so the student may 
learn the theoretical foundations of modern psy- 
chology as well as applications to the individual and 
to society. There are four main areas of concentra- 
tion: personality and social psychology; experimental 
psychology; developmental psychology and human- 
istic psychology. A student may choose to concen- 
trate in one of the four areas or develop her own 
program of concentration in consultation with the 
Chairman. Much of the course work involves re- 
search, independent study and direct experience in 
the field so that the student may be well prepared for 
graduate study or professional careers. 

The Department has for some time offered pro- 
grams in cooperation with neighboring hospitals and 
guidance clinics, where the student may improve her 
own training by observing psychology in practice. 
Recently, inter-departmental programs of study have 
been initiated, and curricular exchange with other 
colleges is being extended. 

The teaching faculty represent varying schools of 
thought in contemporary psychology, and specialize 
in different branches, some stressing the biological 
aspect, some the social; some following a behavioral, 
some a phenomenological approach. This allows the 



73 



major student who plans her whole program care- 
fully to have an integrated view of the field and a wide 
understanding of its possibilities. Courses are num- 
bered to indicate level of content and area of concen- 
tration. 

The areas of concentration are numbered in this way: 
40 Developmental, emphasizing child development. 

50, 70 Social and Personality, emphasizing the influence 

of society and groups on each person. 
60 Experimental, emphasizing research on animals 

and statistical research. 
80 Humanistic, exploring those strictly human as- 

pects of man such as creativity, religious and 
moral development. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Prerequisites: (1) Pg 161 or 162 

(2) Pg 171 or 172 

(3) Pg 225, 226 

Required Courses: Pg 227, Pg 354, Pg 363-364 and at least 
five other courses above Pg 300. Courses in the major must 
be completed with a minimum grade of C. 
A Senior Project, Pg 499, is always required. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

Prerequisites Pg 203 or Pg 226 and four other courses above 
Pg 230 in the area of concentration chosen by the student 
under the direction of one or more members of the Depart- 
ment. Two courses at least should be over Pg 300. Courses 
in the minor must be completed with a minimum grade of C. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

The Psychology Department presents four areas of concen- 
tration. All areas have as prerequisites the courses listed 
(Pg 225 or 226, Pg 363-364, Pg 354). 

I. Personality and Social Psychology 

Pg 275 Psychological Issues in Environmental 
Problems; Pg 371 Social Psychology; Pg 372 Ex- 
perimental Social Psychology; Pg 373 Psychology 
of Attitude Change; Pg 374 Group Dynamics; Pg 
375 Psychology of Conflict, Aggression and Al- 
truism; Pg 376 Industrial Psychology; Pg 471 Per- 
son Perception; Pg 484 Psychology of Woman. 



II. Experimental and Statistical Research 

Pg 363-364 Experimental Psychology; Pg 468 Tu- 
torial or Advanced Statistics; Pg 368 Physiological 
Psychology; Pg 465 Principles of Behavior Modi- 
fication; Pg 466 Comparative Psychology; electives 
in Mathematics and/or Biology. 

III. Child and Development Psychology 

Pg 245, 246 Child Development; Pg 248 Psy- 
chology of Adolescence and Adulthood; Pg 343 
Cognitive Growth; Pg 358 Psychological Assess- 
ment; Pg 446 Learning and Emotional Problems of 
Children; Pg 447 Topics in Developmental Psy- 
chology; electives in Education Program. 

IV. Humanistic Psychology 

Pg 381 Humanistic Psychology; Pg 382 Topics in 
Humanistic Psychology; Pg 383 Psychology of Re- 
ligion; Pg 385 Psychology of Motivation; Pg 484 
Psychology of Woman. 

Pg 161, 162 Mathematics for the Psychologist 

1, 1 (unit) 
An introduction to the mathematical tools essential to the 
present day psychologist. The elementary ideas involved in 
using graphs, probability theory, computers, etc. are pre- 
sented in such a way as to show how they are related to the 
field of psychology. 

Pg 171, 172 Human Physiology 1, 1 (unit) 
A study of all the systems of man including both gross and 
microscopic anatomy. 

Pg 203 General Psychology 1 (unit) 
A beginning course in psychology for non-psychology majors. 
Emphasis will be placed on the chief problems of psychology 
and their practical applications. 

Pg 225, 226 Introduction to Psychology 1, 1 (unit) 
A study of the chief problems of psychology and an intro- 
duction to methods of research. 

Pg 227 Statistics 1 (unit) 
An introduction to statistical terms and concepts, measures 
of central tendency, variability and relationship; theory of 
sampling; reliability of statistical measures; regression and 
prediction. Not open to freshmen. 

No late registrants will be accepted in this course. 



74 



Pg 245, 246 Child Development 1, 1 (unit) 
An introduction to human development from conception 
through late childhood. Physical, cognitive, social and per- 
sonality development will be studied with attention to rele- 
vant innate and environmental influences. Course goals 
Include increased understanding of normal child behavior 
and appreciation of important theoretical contributions and 
empirical findings in the development area. 

Pg 248 Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood 

1 (unit) 
Erikson, Piaget, Allport and others provide the theoretical 
framework for an exploration of the physical, emotional, 
moral, intellectual and social problems of five developmental 
stages: late childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle- 
and old-age. 

Pg 275 Psychological Issues In Environmental Problems 

1 (unit) 
A study of psychological, social and ethical implications of 
population growth and related environmental problems. The 
intent of this course is to increase the student's awareness 
of environmental problems and to introduce her to the rela- 
tively new field of population psychology. 

Pg 343 Cognitive Growth 1 (unit) 
Developmental theories, particularly those of Piaget, will pro- 
vide the major concepts for the study of cognitive develop- 
ment from infancy through adolescence. Concept attain- 
ment, language development and creativity are among the 
topics to be considered. Offered 1974-75. 

Pg 351 Abnormal Psychology 1 (unit) 
An introduction to psychopathology. In addition to formal 
diagnostic categories, illustrated with case histories, this 
course explores theories and empirical data relevant to the 
understanding and treatment of maladaptive behavior. 

Prerequisite: Pg 354. 

Pg 354 Theories of Personality 1 (unit) 
A consideration of major personality theories. Attention is 
given to their utility in understanding normal personality. 

Pg 358 Psychological Assessment 1 (unit) 
The theory, practice and problems of psychological assess- 
ment will be explored by evaluating the reliability and validity 
of major standardized and projective tests. Supervised field 



experience with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children 
will provide perspective and a deeper understanding of the 
nature of psychological assessment. Limited to 15 juniors 
and seniors. 

Prerequisites: Pg 227 and Pg 354. 

Pg 363-364 Experimental Psychology 1-1 (unit) 
Basic concepts and development of experimental psychology. 
Introduction to experimental methods and writing research 
reports. Laboratory experiments in sensorimotor reactions, 
reaction time, association and learning processes, work and 
fatigue curve, emotional reactions and social behavior. 

Pg 365 History of Psychology 1 (unit) 
A study of the development of psychology from its origins 
in philosophy, the biological sciences and sociology to its 
present forms. Emphasis on main problems, solved and yet 
unsolved, which have characterized the discipline. Offered 
1974-75. 

Pg 368 Physiological Psychology 1 (unit) 
A survey of the effect of the systems of the body on the 
personality with major emphasis on the nervous system. 
This course presupposes a knowledge of human anatomy. 

Pg 371 Social Psychology 1 (unit) 
The study of normal human behavior in terms of interaction 
with other individuals, in small groups and in larger orga- 
nizations. Consideration of major theories in the field of 
social psychology. Students will participate in social psy- 
chological research. 

Pg 372 Experimental Social Psychology 1 (unit) 
Major emphasis is on group research projects which students 
design and develop. The course also includes seminars on 
methodological issues and on the philosophy and limitations 
of research. 

Pg 373 Psychology of Attitude Change 1 (unit) 
Analysis of the nature of attitudes and theory of attitude 
development. Students will be initiated into the methods of 
assessing attitudes. 

Pg 374 Group Dynamics 1 (unit) 
Overview of the theory and research on major aspects of 
small group functioning, e.g., leadership, communication, 
performance. The emphasis in the course will be on reports 
from the psychological literature, but students may partici- 



75 



pate in one or more group experiences as additional sources 
of understanding group process. 

Prerequisite: Pg 371 or approval of the instructor. 

Pg 375 Psychology of Conflict, Aggression and Altruism 

1 (unit) 
Discussion of reports of laboratory simulations of conflict. 
The course relates research on conflict to current and his- 
torical conflicts such as campus unrest, the Vietnam war and 
other subjects of interest to the students. Offered 1974-75. 

Pg 376 Industrial Psychology 1 (unit) 
Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and social foun- 
dations of industrial psychology. Topic areas considered 
will include: decision making; organizational behavior; hu- 
man relations and management problems; principles of 
human performance. 

Pg 381 Humanistic Psychology 1 (unit) 
Reading of the chief works of Freud, Jung and the human- 
istic psychologists such as Maslow, May and Laing. Critiques 
of the theories on creativity symbolism and transcendence. 

Prerequisite: Pg 354 or approval of the instructor. 

Pg 382 Topics In Humanistic Psychology 1 (unit) 
This is a continuation of Pg 381. Greater study will be made 
of the works of Jung and Rollo May according to the inter- 
ests of the students. A reading seminar, it is limited to 20 
students. 

Pg 383 Psychology of Religion 1 (unit) 
Various aspects of man's search for the sacred will be ex- 
plored. Contemporary phenomena such as the interest in 
the occult, in meditation, in ritual and in moral development 
will be seen in the light of psychological theory and research. 

Pg 385 Psychology of Motivation 1 (unit) 
Students will analyze various theories of motivation, con- 
scious and unconscious, as well as the nature of emotion 
and needs and the assessment of motives. Application of 
motivation theory to advertising and education will be made. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Pg 446 Learning and Emotional Problems of Childhood 

1 (unit) 
Disorders of childhood, ranging from mild behavior problems 
and specific learning disabilities to psychosis, are the focus 
of this seminar. Theoretical issues and empirical findings 



are considered, as well as case material, to encourage both 
analytical and critical thinking on the part of the student and 
to heighten sensitivity to the uniqueness of each child's 
personality and specific problems. Limited to 20 juniors 
and seniors. 

Prerequisites: Pg 245 or 246 

Pg 351 or approval of instructor. 

Pg 447 Topics in Developmental Psychology 1 (unit) 
Selected topics in child, adolescent or adult psychology will 
be investigated in depth with particular attention to the 
formulation of research problems and the design of studies. 
Limited to 15 students. 

Prerequisites: Pg 245 or 246 or 248. 

Pg 453^54 Field Work in Psychology 2 (units) 
A year-long course of field work in mental health settings. 
Lectures and discussions will emphasize the role of the psy- 
chologist, the place of mental health services in a community 
structure and evaluation of effectiveness of service. Students 
must enroll for both semesters. No credit will be given for 
one semester. Pass/Fail only. 

Pg 465 Principles of Behavior Modification 1 (unit) 
A study of the various approaches to behavior modification. 
Their application to behavior problems in school and else- 
where will be shown. 

Pg 466 Comparative Psychology 1 (unit) 
A laboratory course in animal behavior offered together with 
the Department of Biology. Major topics will include: the 
interaction between biological and sensory capacities; the 
overt behavioral patterns of organisms in perception, learn- 
ing and social processes; and the differences between human 
and animal behavior. Offered 1974-75. 

Pg 468 Tutorial in Advanced Statistics 1 (unit) 
The students will get acquainted with more advanced sta- 
tistical techniques, such as analysis of variance and cluster 
analysis, and how to apply them. 

Prerequisite: Pg 227. 

Pg 471 Person Perception 1 (unit) 
Research on the way persons are perceived and the causes 
for the variations. The effect of distorted person perception 
on communication and interpersonal relations is explored. 
Offered 1974-75. 



76 



Pg 484 Psychology of Woman 1 (unit) 
A study of the research done on various aspects of woman, 
sex role development and stereotypes, theories of psycho- 
logical differences in relation to woman's position in con- 
temporary society. Approval of instructor. 

Pg 495, 496 Student Assistantship in Psychology 

1, 1 (unit) 
Qualified students can assist a professor in designing and 
conducting either a particular course or a significant piece of 
research. Approval by the professor conducting the course 
or research, by the Department, and by a representative of 
the Dean's office is required. 

Pg 497, 498 Independent Study in Psychology 

1, 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
directing the study and as approved by the Department 
Chairman and Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one In- 
dependent Study course should be carried in any one semes- 
ter. (Please refer to policy on independent study.) 

Pg 499 Senior Project 1 (unit) 
Presentation for departmental evaluation of research done 
on one problem in psychology. Project may be completed 
in either the fall or spring semester. 



RELIGION 

To study religion in the twentieth century is both an 
exciting and a challenging enterprise. We live in a 
technological global village in which new questions 
about the ultimate meaning and significance of life 
continually emerge. Religious traditions and beliefs 
need to be constantly reexamined and reformulated 
to meet the demands of modern life. Within such a 
context, the study of religion at Newton College is 
approached both as an academic endeavor and as an 
existential inquiry. As an integral part of a value- 



oriented college the Department sees its role as help- 
ing students appreciate what it means to be a Chris- 
tian in the modern world. Through a variety of 
courses and approaches students learn to examine 
empathetically and critically the traditions and com- 
mitments of various faith communities (their own and 
those of other peoples). The emphasis throughout 
is two-fold: (1) helping the student to understand 
the faith stances of other people; (2) enabling her to 
achieve her own personal synthesis regarding the 
meaning of the religious dimension in today's world. 

The program provides an excellent background 
either for graduate study in religion and related fields 
or for vocational opportunities in such areas as edu- 
cation and social service. 

Whether studying religion as a major or minor 
study or taking an occasional elective, the student 
will find her study relevant to our times and appro- 
priately sophisticated for a modern educated woman. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

With the advice of a professor in the Department, each stu- 
dent should plan a program of at least ten courses (to be 
completed with a minimum grade of C) including at least 
four 300 level courses and at least four 400 level courses. 
In addition, all senior majors should enroll in the Senior 
Honors Seminar. Of the ten required courses, two upper- 
division courses may be taken within other departments 
with the approval of the Religion Department Chairman. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

With the advice of a professor in the Department, each stu- 
dent should plan a program of at least five courses (to be 
completed with a minimum grade of C) including at least 
two 300 level courses and at least two 400 level courses. 
Of the five required courses, one upper-division course may 
be taken within other departments with the approval of the 
Religion Department Chairman. 

LE 171 The Quest for Meaning: The Religious 
Experience of Mankind 1 (unit) 
All mankind is by its very nature religious. In every age men 



77 



and women have sought to understand the mystery of birth, 
the origin of good and evil, the uncertainty of suffering and 
death. This course is designed to investigate a variety of 
religious traditions to determine how peoples of every age 
have perceived reality at the deepest levels of their existence. 
Of particular significance will be insights from these tradi- 
tions which seem pertinent to our own time and our own 
lives. 

LE 172 God, Man, and Nature 1 (unit) 
What is the nature of the created order and man's place 
within it? A consideration of this question from a biblical 
theological point of view followed by an assessment of 
modern man's use and misuse of his natural environment. 
Specific examples drawn from field trips, films, lectures as 
a basis for discussion and reflection on man's relationship 
to the created order. 

LE 174 Man and Woman: Biblical Perspectives on Role 
and Relationship 1 (unit) 
What does it mean to be a man or a woman in the twentieth 
century? This question will be examined both from the per- 
spective of current expectations and from the perspective 
of what it meant to be man and woman in the biblical tra- 
dition. Particular emphasis throughout on the role of the 
Judeo-Chrjstian tradition in formulating present-day models 
of human sex roles. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 211-212 Tutorial in Biblical Hebrew 1-1 (unit) 
Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar of Biblical 
Hebrew. Emphasis on learning to read simple sentences in 
the Hebrew Old Testament and on acquiring a facility in 
using the critical notes in the Hebrew text. Offered yearly 
on demand. 

Re 221 Introduction to the Bible 1 (unit) 
The Bible has been called the greatest book ever written. 
In light of such a claim, this course will investigate sys- 
tematically and critically the contents of both Old and New 
Testaments. Emphasis on the historical and theological de- 
velopment of the Israelites, the Jews and the early Christians 
as they struggled to understand God, man and the meaning 
of life. Consideration throughout on the relevance of the 
Bible to Christian faith in particular and to western culture 
in general. 

Re 238 Modern Judaism 1 (unit) 
An examination of the historical and theological process by 



which modern Judaism emerged including a study of Jewish 
festivals and present-day theological trends in Judaism. 
Some attention will be given to the theological bases for 
Jewish-Christian dialogue. Field experience in the Greater 
Boston area encouraged. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 241 The Mystery of Woman: Her Dignity and 
Destiny 1 (unit) 
An examination of the changing role of woman in the com- 
munity, the home, the Church, in the light of her response 
to personal call. The Eve syndrome, the cult of the Virgin, 
womanly love of God and neighbor, her unique needs, gifts 
and dignity and their contribution toward her own fulfillment 
and her situation in the world. Other topics as requested. 

Re 243 Psychology of Religion 1 (unit) 
A study of selected topics such as the analyst and the Chris- 
tian Guru; the unconscious and God; sanctity and sanity; 
devils and neurosis; agape and eros; sin and guilt; mystical 
experience and depth psychology. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 246 Mysticism: East and West 1 (unit) 
A comparative study of contemplative prayer, its goal and 
its preparatory disciplines in Orient and Occident, with a view 
to assessing the place of the mystic consciousness in the 
"convergence of world religions." Offered 1974-75. 

Re 261 Introduction to Christian Ethics 1 (unit) 
This course will examine contemporary moral issues from a 
Christian perspective. Since few issues are completely new, 
it will also look to moral thought of the past in order to 
introduce the sources and historical development of Chris- 
tian ethics. A particular concern of the course will be to 
discern the relative importance attributed to the various 
ingredients of the decision-making process: principles, laws, 
custom, conscience, consequences and fundamental con- 
cepts of man. 

Re 262 Changing Moral Values 1 (unit) 
This course will examine significant changes in behavior, 
attitudes and values, especially among young people. It 
will focus on issues which have moral implications, such as 
sexuality and family planning, and on changing attitudes — 
such as those toward woman's careers, work and leisure, 
life style and child care, authority and discipline — which 
imply, at least to some people, changing moral values. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the moral implications of these 
changes and the ways they are handled by moral thinkers. 



78 



Re 270 The Sense of the Satanic and the Uncanny: 
Witches, Ghosts, and Demons 1 (unit) 
A study of the natural, preternatural and supernatural ele- 
ments in our notions concerning the personification of evil 
and the delegation of evil powers to men and especially to 
women. A look at the persistent belief in an afterlife as ex- 
hibited through ghostly apparitions and the Idea of a residual 
energy force operating post mortem. 

Directed Study Courses V2-I (unit) 
These courses are offered each semester to students who 
are prepared to do serious, independent work in the par- 
ticular topic area with the guidance of the professor. En- 
rollment in these courses is limited and by permission of the 
professor. 

Re 311 A Major Moral Thinkers 
B Biblical Archaeology 

Re 312 A Religious Education: Theory and Practice 
B Mythology in the Bible and Ancient Near 
Eastern Literatures 

Re 313 A Early Christian Doctrine. Offered 1974-75 
B Old Testament Prophets. Offered 1974-75 

Re 314 A Sacramental Theology. Offered 1974-75 
B The Gospel of John. Offered 1974-75 

Re 323 Jesus in the Gospels 1 (unit) 
How much can we know about Jesus from the gospels? How 
can the gospels be used as sources for Christian faith? Con- 
sideration of these two questions including an in-depth 
study of the teachings of Jesus as contained in the gospels 
with particular emphasis on their meaning for modern man. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Re 330 Paul and Early Christianity 1 (unit) 
A consideration of the religious and historical milieu in which 
the early Christian Church arose. The major questions will 
be "why" and "how" the Christian community survived and 
grew. The focal point will be the letters of Paul with par- 
ticular emphasis on his contribution as a theologian-writer 
in the early Church. The meaning of Paul for today will be 
considered throughout. 

Re 342 The History of Christian Though 1 (unit) 
Readings in seminal texts in the Fathers, Doctors and other 
key theologians from 200 A.D. to the beginning of our own 



century, as background for understanding the contemporary 
situation. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 354 Ethics and Foreign Policy 1 (unit) 
An examination, from a Christian ethical perspective, of 
several international political issues. As important as analy- 
sis of the issues themselves will be reflection on the Chris- 
tian viewpoint from which they are examined. Areas to be 
discussed include war and national defense. United States 
policy toward third world nations, religion and ideology in 
international affairs. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 356 Movement and Revolution in the Catholic 
Church 1 (unit) 
This course will focus on new forms of Christian commu- 
nities, both those which constitute movements within the 
Catholic Church (underground church, Pentecostal move- 
ment, Christian communes, parish reform), and those which 
constitute "church substitutes" in the sense that they serve 
the kinds of human needs traditionally served by the Church. 
The course will be concerned with both the values and lia- 
bilities of the Church's institutional traditions and with the 
extent to which movements and alternative communities 
have grown from both reform and lack of reform. 

Re 362 The Church in Contemporary Society 1 (unit) 
An examination of the various functions of the Church, both 
as a religious community and as a social institution in the 
contemporary world. The central question of the course is 
this: what is the mission of the Church, what kind of influ- 
ence does it wish to have and how is that mission best 
achieved? Offered 1974-75. 

Re 401 Senior Honors Seminar 1 (unit) 
Required of all Religion majors. Religion minors are wel- 
come to participate either for credit or as auditors. Partici- 
pation in the seminar will include preparation of seminar 
paper/senior project during the course of the semester. 

Re 441 Seminar: Ethics and Social Institutions 

1 (unit) 
The use and distribution of wealth, health care and medical 
ethics will be focal topics of this course. In addition to con- 
sidering actual and potential institutions pertinent to these 
areas, the course will be generally concerned with the rele- 
vance of the Christian understanding of man and the world 
to social institutions and social change. 



79 



Re 442 Seminar: Comparative Religious Ethics 

1 (unit) 
A study of the fundamental moral teaching of western and 
eastern religions a comparison of these with each other and 
with prevalent trends in non-religious moral thought in an 
effort to determine the extent to which each is really distinc- 
tive. 

Re 451 Seminar: Ethics and Politics in America 

1 (unit) 
This course will evaluate the actual and potential roles of 
religion and ethics in American politics. It will be especially 
concerned with topics such as the separation between church 
and state, morally-based political protest, the role of ethics 
in the formulation of public policy, ethics and political office, 
moral goals and the democratic process. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 452 Seminar: Christians and the State: Reinhold 
Niebuhr's Political Ethics 1 (unit) 
This seminar will discuss in depth a selection of Niebuhr's 
writings on the Christian understanding of the political order. 
Questions such as the following will receive special attention: 
Why do men make states? What is the function of power? 
Has love any place in politics? Is there legitimacy to the use 
of force and violence? What is the relation of the political 
order to human destiny? Offered 1974-75. 

Re 453 Seminar: Religious Institutions and the Politics 
of Social Change: Suburban 1 (unit) 
Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific churches and synagogues respond 
to social issues. Participants will be asked to analyze the 
socio-political and religious profile of a particular church or 
synagogue and to assess the dynamics of response within 
that institution. Emphasis on the formulation of major ques- 
tions and on the development of observation techniques by 
seminar participants themselves. Bi-weekly meetings. Same 
as PS 453. 

Re 454 Seminar: Theology of Liberation 1 (unit) 
We live in an age in which many people from all walks of 
life speak of "liberation." This seminar is designed to in- 
vestigate what "liberation" means both at the institutional 
and personal levels. The central thrust will be to consider 
how the Christian faith (particularly in its biblical dimen- 
sion) may contribute to, and indeed foster, authentic libera- 
tion. A variety of peoples and experiences — ancient and 
modern — will serve as a basis for common reflection. 



Re 455 Seminar Religious Institutions and the Politics 
of Social Change: Urban 1 (unit) 
Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific religious institutions and/or groups 
(e.g., the Anti-Defamation League, Massachusetts Council of 
Churches, Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries, the Planning 
Office for Urban Affairs of the Archdiocese of Boston, the 
East Boston Collaborative, etc.) respond to social issues in 
terms of programs initiated and implemented. Participants 
will be asked to analyze the structure, the goals and the 
dynamics of the particular institution and/or group in order 
to assess the effectiveness of its responses. Emphasis on 
the formulation of major questions and on the development 
of observation techniques by seminar participants them- 
selves. Bi-weekly meetings. Same as PS 455. Offered 
1974-75. 

Re 458 Seminar: Biblical Perspectives on Modern Life 

1 (unit) 
Emphasis on dialogue between biblical and modern views of 
life. Consideration of various hermeneutical methods by 
which modern man seeks to understand the Bible followed 
by an assessment of the challenge of the biblical message 
to modern man. Such issues as life-style, the nature of 
personhood, the nature of love, etc., will be considered. 
Offered 1974-75. 

Re 461 Seminar: Religious Dimensions in Literature 

1 (unit) 
A study of such perennial themes as love of God and love of 
neighbor, agape and eros, freedom, good and evil, guilt, 
ecastasy, life and death, the search for meaning and fulfill- 
ment, the quest for the Absolute, as seen in great literary 
masterpieces of yesterday and today. Offered 1974-75. 

Re 462 Seminar: Contemporary Theology: Teilhard de 
Chardin and Thomas Merton 1 (unit) 
An investigation of such Teilhardian themes as evolution, 
freedom and determinism. Christian optimism, the future of 
man, creation, Cosmogenesis, Christogenesis, the Omega 
Point, the divine milieu. A study of Merton's life and the 
development of his thought with special attention to his dia- 
logue with Eastern religions and his growing concern with 
social issues. 

Re 463 Seminar: Varieties of Unbelief 1 (unit) 
An examination of the positions of Feuerbach, Nietzche, 



80 



Marx, Comte, Freud, Camus, Sartre, the "death of God" 
theologians and the contemporary situation of secularity as 
it poses the urgent question of belief or unbelief. Offered 
1974-75. 

Re 493, 494 Directed Field Experience in Religious/ 
Social Institutions V2-I, V2-I (unit) 
An opportunity for qualified students to participate in a field 
educational setting and to reflect on the meaning and 
method of that experience with a professor or with professors 
in the Department. Approval by the professor directing the 
field experience and by the Department Chairman is required. 

Re 495, 496 Student Assistantship in Religion 

1/2-1. 1/2-1 (unit) 
An opportunity for qualified students to assist a professor 
in designing and conducting a particular course. Approval 
by the professor conducting the course and by the Depart- 
ment Chairman is required. 

Re 497, 498 Independent Study in Religion 

1/2-1, 1/2-1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the study as agreed to by the professor directing the 
study and as approved by the Department Chairman and the 
Division Director. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that In- 
dependent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Inde- 
pendent Study should be carried in any one semester. 
(Please refer to policy on independent study.) 



SOCIOLOGY 

The Sociology curriculum offers students a perspec- 
tive on understanding man's social existence and the 
consequences of his social experiences. The socio- 
logical mode of understanding may be valuable to 
students in various ways. It may have personal value 
for individual students attempting to bring order to 
the present by understanding the social patterns of 



the past and the dimensions of the future. Students 
planning careers in fields such as social service, law 
and journalism will find sociological understanding 
enriching and complementary to their professional 
education. Finally, students who have made a pro- 
fessional commitment to sociology will find the rich- 
est sociological traditions embodied in the curriculum 
and that a major in Sociology may serve as a prepa- 
ration for graduate study in sociology or in anthro- 
pology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

The major in Sociology is designed to permit each student 
to develop a combination of courses deriving its coherence 
from a topic of interest to her. The Department requires that 
each major develop a focus for her program in consultation 
with departmental faculty members. Each new major, there- 
fore, is expected to submit a preliminary statement of her 
topical interest, including a tentative plan of course study 
for discussion with departmental members. Each major's 
program should include at least ten courses (to be com- 
pleted with a minimum grade of C) including So 302, 305 or 
404, 401, 499, and two non-departmental courses related 
to her topical interest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

In consultation with a departmental faculty member each 
student should plan a program of at least five courses (to be 
completed with a minimum grade of C) including So 302 
or 305. 

LE 163, 164 Sociological Thought 1, 1 (unit) 
Introduction to sociological thought; discussion of some of 
the issues confronting sociology as a science. Cross-cultural 
readings and classic studies in sociology. 

LE 167, 168 Comparative Social Systems 1, 1 (unit) 
Introduction to social systems analysis. Consideration of 
various structural and dynamic aspects of social systems 
within a cross-cultural perspective. 1973-74: African social 
systems. 



81 



So 251 Afro-American Social Systems 1 (unit) 
Study of the social forces and psychological mechanisms 
that played a part in the development of social systems in 
Black America. Particular attention to slavery and its social 
and psychological sequelae. 

So 261 Sociology of the Family 1 (unit) 
A look at the family as a cultural institution with emphasis 
on the potentials and alternatives for creating family life. 

So 262 Family and Kinship Systems 1 (unit) 
Inquiry into structural and dynamic aspects of family and 
kinship systems in Western and non-Western societies. 

So 302 Theory 1 (unit) 
Emergence of sociological thought in the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries examination of the dominant ideas and 
assumptions about man and his social existence. Theory 
and explanation in sociology today: the state of the field. 

So 305 Research Methods 1 (unit) 
Sociological research strategies and procedures; statistical 
procedures for data analysis and their implications. 

So 341 Urbanization 1 (unit) 
The structure and functioning of the city in historical and 
cross-cultural perspective. Consideration of future forms of 
the city. 

So 342 Urban Communities 1 (unit) 
Exploration of the differences in community life based on 
social class and ethnicity and the consequent variation in 
functioning of public service bureaucracies. 

So 343 Urban Planning 1 (unit) 
Social, economic, political and technical issues of modern 
city planning; emphasis upon political issues and problem 
solving in American urban centers. 

So 344 Urban Field Work 1 (unit) 
Theoretical and practical introduction to field work in an 
urban setting. 

So 348 Urban Black Community: 1900-1970 1 (unit) 
Study of the development of black communities in major 
urban areas of the United States. Particular attention to 



bureaucratic systems and political forces that contributed 
to the development of various black communities. 

So 361 Sociology of Religion 1 (unit) 
Consideration of classical and contemporary works in the 
sociology of religion; exploration of various topics in the field 
from a cross-cultural perspective; sociological inquiry into 
contemporary religion in America. 

So 382 Sociology of Art and Literature 1 (unit) 

Inquiry into major issues in the sociology of art and litera- 
ture with particular emphasis on non-Western aesthetics and 
art forms. 

So 401 Seminar: Senior Seminar 1 (unit) 
Students integrate their sociological understanding: issues 
in the development and application of sociological knowledge 
are identified and clarified through a select list of common 
readings. 

So 404 Seminar: Methodological Issues 1 (unit) 
Consideration of major methodological issues of sociology 
including value-free sociology, reduction, the possibility of 
cross-cultural knowledge, etc. 

So 421 Seminar: Precopernican Worlds 1 (unit) 
Study of cosmologies of preindustrial societies through so- 
ciological analysis of ritual and drama. Inquiry into the 
sociological analysis of ritual symbolism, particularly in 
Africa, precedes an application of these methods to Greek 
and Shakespearean tragedy. 

So 497, 498 Independent Study 1/2-1, 1/2-1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor supervising the study and as approved by the 
Chairman of the Department and the Division Director. The 
student must successfully carry through the project as out- 
lined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that the 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 

So 499 Senior Project 

Ordinarily to be taken after So 401. 



82 



URBAN STUDIES 



Urban Studies is a recent and rapidly growing phe- 
nomenon in undergraduate education in the United 
States. It is an effort to put urban life and problems 
in a central place in the college curriculum. 

The purpose of the program is to help students 
obtain increased appreciation of the creative role of 
the city in modern life and culture, a keener percep- 
tion of the nature of the metropolis as a community 
system, a fuller understanding of the organizational 
structures of urban life, a better grasp of the dy- 
namics of urban change and its concomitant prob- 
lems, opportunities of urban life and a greater com- 
petence in a variety of human resource skills typically 
required in urban living. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Urban Studies is an interdepartmentally sponsored major 
designed to permit each student to develop a combination 
of courses related to her interests in both urban studies and 
an academic discipline. Each major develops her program 
in consultation with a faculty advisor. A major's program 
must include at least four courses in a discipline (e.g., Po- 
litical Science or Sociology) and six Urban Studies courses 
including a Senior Project; these ten semester courses must 
be completed with a minimum grade of C. 

Urban Studies courses include the following: 
Ar 376: Seminar on the City of Boston 
Ec 462: Urban Economics — Principles and Problems 
PS 306: State and Local Government in the United States 
PS 325, 326: Urban Practicum 
PS 338: Urban Government and Politics 
PS 455/Re 455: Seminar in Religious Institutions and 
the Politics of Social Change: Urban 



So 341 
So 342 
So 343 
So 344 
So 348 



Urbanization 

Urban Communities 

Urban Planning 

Urban Fieldwork 

Urban Black Community, 1900-1970 



83 



Division of 
Special Programs 



American Studies 
Education 
Liberal Studies 



AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 



The American Studies Program is a coordinated, 
multi-dimensional learning experience in which every 
effort is made to integrate the methods and knowl- 
edge of more than one academic discipline. The sub- 
ject matter for study is America's past and present. 
In brief, the American Studies Program may be com- 
pared to a liberal arts education using America as 
its laboratory. Majors may be found preparing for 
careers in law, teaching, politics, civil service, social 
service, journalism and administration. 

The student in American Studies must have a 
grade of C or better in thirteen semester courses, in- 
cluding Am 401 or Am 402. Within that course range, 
each major is to choose at least one major field and 
one minor field of concentration. Work in the major 
field consists of at least eight (8) units and the minor 
field at least four (4) units. Presently, major fields 
of concentration include: American History, Ameri- 
can Government and Politics, Sociology, Economics, 
Urban Studies, and American Literature. Minor fields 
include any of the designated major fields plus Ameri- 
can Art and American Philosophy and Religion. 

It should be noted that when the all-College require- 
ments and American Studies distribution require- 
ments are fulfilled, each student still has the equiva- 
lent of two years of academic offerings to choose as 
she pleases. Most majors, therefore, try to broaden 
their study of America by choosing offerings in as 
many disciplines as possible. 

A major such as this allows for maximum freedom 
but also places much responsibility on each indi- 
vidual student. Therefore, each student is encour- 
aged to seek as much counseling as she needs in 
order to fashion a meaningful and comprehensive 
educational experience. Those students who plan to 



84 



enter specific career fields or contemplate continuing 
their education in graduate or law schools are re- 
minded of the advisibility of planning their courses 
with this in mind. 

All majors should submit their proposed schedule 
of courses to their advisor and the Coordinator of 
American Studies prior to semester registration. Ad- 
ditionally, each student is encouraged, though not 
required, to participate in some Independent and/or 
Work Study programs. It is recommended, however, 
that not more than one semester or its equivalent be 
used for such purposes. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

American Studies majors enroll in appropriate courses 
offered by the various departments at the College. A list of 
courses, in each department, applicable for American Studies 
credit may be obtained from the Program Coordinator. The 
course selection is most comprehensive. Theoretically speak- 
ing, should a student desire to take every course applicable 
for American Studies, she would need eight years to com- 
plete her studies. In addition there are some specifically 
designed courses for American Studies which include: 

Am 401, 402 American Studies Seminar 1, 1 (unit) 
An examination in depth of certain significant developments 
of the American experience with an emphasis on the modern 
period. Open only to seniors majoring in American Studies 
or American History. Am 402 is a repetition of Am 401 given 
during the second semester. 

Am 495, 496 Work Study 1, 1 (unit) 
A student who wishes to take one or two semesters of Work 
Study will present before registration a typewritten detailed 
description of the project to be undertaken as agreed to by 
the professor monitoring the project and as approved by the 
Dean's Office. 

Am 497, 498 Independent Study in American Studies 

1, 1 (unit) 
A student who wishes to take one or two semesters of an 
interdisciplinary Independent Study will present before regis- 
tration a typewritten detailed description of the course re- 
quirements as agreed to by the professor giving the course 



and as approved by the Program Chairman and the Academic 
Dean. Normally, not more than one Independent Study or 
Work Study should be carried in any one semester. (Please 
refer to policy on independent study.) 

Am 499 Senior Project 0-1 (unit) 
Required of all American Studies majors. 



THE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Though education is not a major area of concentra- 
tion at Newton, the College is able to provide an edu- 
cation program for those who view such learning as 
an important facet of their personal, intellectual and 
humanistic development and for those who choose 
the field of education as a vocation. It is within the 
liberal arts framework and within the experimental 
and theoretical approach of the Education Program 
that Newton makes available the development of 
skills that its graduates will be called upon to use. 
The "education program" is not removed from the 
liberal arts context, but is an integral part of it. Thus, 
it is appropriate that Newton's Education Program 
reflect that philosophy. Based on this belief, the pro- 
gram will provide experiences that will: 

a) help students develop an understanding of hu- 
man development and learning as it relates to them 
personally and to their young students; 

b) help sensitize students to become teachers 
concerned with the affective as well as cognitive 
needs of young students; 

c) develop an understanding of the philosophy, 
history and sociology of education; 

d) help students gain knowledge about general 
educational developments and developments in their 
field of teaching specialization. 

The program may be divided into a) Theoretical- 
Experiential Component and b) Student Teaching 



85 



Component. While all students are encouraged to 
participate in the Education Program, those who wish 
to practice teach must apply and be accepted into 
the Student Teaching Component. 

The program meets the certification requirements 
of Massachusetts and of most other states. Although 
the Education Program staff will provide guidance 
and counseling, it is the responsibility of the student 
to know the teacher certification requirements of the 
state(s) for which she is seeking certification. While 
there is a program of planned sequence of study for 
students seeking teacher certification, all students 
are encouraged to participate in the Education Pro- 
gram. 



EDUCATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

The Education Program offers a minor in Elementary Educa- 
tion or Secondary Education to those students who satis- 
factorily complete a planned sequence of courses, climaxed 
by the practice teaching experience. Students minoring in 
Elementary Education must take the following six courses: 
Pg 245, 246 Child Development 1 (unit); Ed 201 or 202 
Observation and Participation: Elementary Education 1 (unit); 
Ed 301 Principles and Issues in American Education 1 (unit) 
or Ph 324 Philosophies of Education 1 (unit); Ed 305 or 306 
Methods and Materials for Elementary Education 1 (unit); 
Ed 309 or 310 Curriculum Development in Elementary Edu- 
cation 1 (unit); Ed 401 or 402 Advanced Seminar and Prac- 
ticum 2 (units). 

Students minoring in Secondary Education must take the 
following six courses: Pg 248 Psychology of Adolescence 
and Adulthood 1 (unit); Ed 203 or 204 Observation and Par- 
ticipation: Secondary Education 1 (unit); Ed 301 Principles 
and Issues in American Education 1 (unit) or Ph 324 Phi- 
losophies of Education 1 (unit); Ed 308 or 309 Methods and 
Materials for Secondary Education 1 (unit); Ed 311 or 312 
Curriculum Development in Secondary Education 1 (unit); 
Ed 403 or 404 Advanced Seminar and Practicum 2 (units). 



Ed 201, 202 Observation and Participation: 

Elementary Education 1, 1 (unit) 
This course will provide experience in observing and working 
with young students in their educational setting several hours 
per week. Group meetings will provide opportunity to reflect 
upon and evaluate the on-site experience. Open to all stu- 
dents. Prerequisite to student teaching. 

Ed 203, 204 Observation and Participation: 

Secondary Education 1, 1 (unit) 
This course will provide experience in observing and working 
with high school students in their educational setting several 
hours per week. Group meetings will provide opportunity to 
reflect upon and evaluate the on-site experience. Open to 
all students. Prerequisite to student teaching. 

Ed 205 Teaching of Reading 1 (unit) 
A course devised to appraise research and successful prac- 
tices in the field of reading instruction. Included in this 
course will be discussions and practical applications of 
methods and diagnostic tools, also surveys and comparisons 
of current instructional materials, such as basal readers, 
linguistics, audio-visual aids, learning disabilities, teacher- 
made materials, sample lessons and demonstrations of cur- 
rent methods. 

Ed 208 Teaching Language Arts Skills 1 (unit) 
A study of new trends and practices in the area of Reading, 
Language Arts and Children's Literature as well as practical 
use of the Language Arts in a variety of learning activities 
and curriculum areas. 

Ed 301 Principles and Issues in American Education 

1 (unit) 
An examination of philosophical, social, political and his- 
torical principles underlying American education and the 
relationship of these principles to selected current issues. 

Ed 304 Alternative Educational Systems 1 (unit) 
In order to assume a leadership role in American society, 
our educational system must begin to address itself more 
directly to the needs of all its students. Although this may 
be done through traditional learning structures, it also re- 
quires the development of other learning structures. An 
example of a "school" meeting the challenge of new ap- 
proaches to learning is the "School Without Walls." This 
course intends to introduce the student to people involved 



86 



in innovative programs, to learn about several experimental 
programs in the Boston area and wherever possible to ob- 
serve directly some of these programs. 

Ed 305, 306 Methods and Materials for Elementary 
Education 1, 1 (unit) 
The focus of this course will be the planning of instructional 
activities as well as selection, preparation, utilization and 
evaluation of instructional materials. Open to students seek- 
ing teacher certification. Taken in conjunction with Advanced 
Seminar and Practicum. Also open to seniors who have 
completed practice teaching, but need this course for cer- 
tification. 

Ed 307, 308 Methods and Materials for Secondary 
Education 1, 1 (unit) 
The focus of this course will be the planning of instructional 
activities as well as selection, preparation, utilization and 
evaluation of instructional materials. Open to students seek- 
ing teacher certification. Taken in conjunction with Advanced 
Seminar and Practicum. Also open to seniors who have 
completed practice teaching, but need this course for cer- 
tification. 

Ed 309, 310 Curriculum Development In Elementary 
Education 1, 1 (unit) 
A look at the basic philosophical, psychological and socio- 
logical considerations underlying modern curriculum devel- 
opment as they relate to the needs and problems of stu- 
dents, teachers, parents and administrators. Open to stu- 
dents seeking teacher certification. Taken in conjunction with 
Advanced Seminar and Practicum. Also open to seniors who 
have completed practice teaching, but need this course for 
certification. 

Ed 311, 312 Curriculum Development in Secondary 
Education 1, 1 (unit) 
A look at the basic philosophical, psychological and socio- 
logical considerations underlying modern curriculum devel- 
opment as they relate to the needs and problems of stu- 
dents, teachers, parents and administrators. Open to stu- 
dents seeking teacher certification. Taken in conjunction 
with Advanced Seminar and Practicum. Also open to seniors 
who have completed practice teaching, but need this course 
for certification. 



Ed 320 Working with Problem Children in the Classroom 

1 (unit) 
This course is designed for both the student who is plan- 
ning to be a classroom teacher and the student who is 
planning to work in one of the fields of Special Education. 
It will focus on the problem child in the classroom and how 
to cope effectively with situations and difficulties that arise. 
Discussions will focus on all the children in the classroom 
and "how-to-manage" skills will be suggested. 

Ed 401, 402 Advanced Seminar and Practicum: 
Elementary 2, 2 (units) 
Practice teaching for juniors or seniors who have demon- 
strated special competence in teaching. N.B. Grade based 
on Pass/Fail. 

Ed 403, 404 Advanced Seminar and Practicum: 
Secondary 2, 2 (units) 
Practice teaching for juniors or seniors who have demon- 
strated special competence in teaching. N.B. Grade based 
on Pass/Fail. 

Ed 497, 498 Independent Study 1, 1 (unit) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters in 
independent study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the study requirements as agreed to by the professor 
directing the study, by the Program Coordinator, and as ap- 
proved by the Academic Dean. The student must success- 
fully carry through the project as outlined. It is only if these 
conditions are satisfied that Independent Study will carry 
academic credit. (Please refer to policy on independent 
study.) 



LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM 

The Liberal Studies Program, begun In 1970, is 
Newton's first large-scale model for a curriculum 
which will not be discipline-centered and yet will give 
the student a co-ordinated learning experience, equip 
her with basic skills for thinking in several disciplines 
and provide her with faculty advisors in shaping her 
own academic program. 

The aim of the Liberal Studies Program is the aim 



87 



of liberal education, the improvement of the quality 
of human life. This fundamental aim is essentially 
dependent on a person's understanding of herself 
and on her interplay with a complex social and physi- 
cal environment. Consequently, within the scope of 
man's varying individual abilities and interests, lib- 
eral education should serve the function of augment- 
ing one's understanding and ability to deal with him- 
self and his world, the world of persons and of things. 
Liberal education also recognizes man as a purposive 
being. As such, man has the capacity to evaluate and 
to appreciate, morally and aesthetically, what he is, 
what he encounters and what he seeks to become. 

Christian liberal education has an additional typi- 
cally fundamental aim. It recognizes that human life 
is incomplete without the religious dimension. In so 
doing. Christian liberal education rests firm in the 
conviction that the human form of life gives rise to 
the idea of man's inclination to partake in a religious 
form of life, whether that stems from devotion to 
reason or from emotions or from both. 

Within the scope of these objectives, students pur- 
suing the Liberal Studies Program are the principal 
self-active agents. They are encouraged to bear maxi- 
mum responsibility for developing their own educa- 
tions. The Program, therefore, requires no specific 
courses. Instead, under the guidance of the Liberal 
Studies Advisory Board, directed programs of study 
are planned individually to take account of the stu- 
dent's educational needs, interests and abilities. 

The Program, through its Advisory Board and the 
concerned cooperation of the student, seeks to en- 
sure the attainment of a broad liberal arts educa- 
tional base. This will involve the student's directed 
and integrated study of the Humanities (including 
Theology), the Social Sciences and the Natural Sci- 
ences (including Logic and Mathematics). 

The Program, however, recognizes that mere ex- 



posure to the three areas of human knowledge is not 
sufficient for a well-rounded liberal arts education. 
The goal of the Program is to enable the student to 
understand the complementary relation of the various 
disciplines which she pursues in the three major 
areas of human knowledge — the areas with which 
any educated person should be acquainted. 

The broad liberal arts educational base should en- 
able the student to concentrate her study in a par- 
ticular field or a combination of fields or even on a 
particular problem. On the other hand, the student's 
interests may not come to a focus. Instead, they may 
become increasingly diversified. The Program is de- 
signed to cope equally well with both eventualities. 
And in either case, the further aim of the Program is 
the same: to ensure that varieties of training in di- 
verse disciplines should become integrated through 
their application to new problems. 

The Senior Project should be the focal point of the 
student's work in the Program. Under the super- 
vision of the Advisory Board, the work on the Senior 
Project should begin early in the junior year and con- 
tinue through the senior year. The Senior Project 
carries at least one unit per semester for four semes- 
ters. 

Any student may apply for admission to the Lib- 
eral Studies Program at any time but normally does 
so from the first semester of the sophomore year 
through the second semester of the junior year. 

To be considered for the program, the student 
should submit to the Director of Liberal Studies an 
intelligently focused prospectus on a course of study. 
The Director, in cooperation with the Advisory Board 
for Liberal Studies, will review the proposed program 
and will decide on a recommendation. 

It is the obligation of the student and the Director 
of Liberal Studies, in cooperation with the Advisory 
Board, to make certain that: 



88 



a) the student's program is appropriately bal- 
anced with respect to various disciplines; 

b) a part of the student's program be at an ad- 
vanced level — i.e., no less than 1/6 of the stu- 
dent's work during the four years at Newton; 

c) no more than 1/2 of the student's work be done 
in one department. 

A provision is made within the Program for stu- 
dents to cooperate in sharing the results of each 
other's investigations for the Senior Project. To this 
end every student in the Program, as well as the 
members of the Advisory Board, will participate in a 
"Liberal Studies Seminar" which will be supervised 
by the Program's Director. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE GROUP 

The Division of Sponsored Research provides a 
framework for the Physical Science Group in which 
to carry out research and development work in sci- 
ence education. The work of the Group includes the 
preparation of curricular materials from the junior 
high school level through college, the organization of 
in-service teacher training courses, and advisory ac- 
tivities in the United States and abroad. The Physical 
Science Group is housed on the first floor of the Barry 
Science Pavilion. 



only gain confidence in using the laboratory equipment, 
analyzing the data obtained and drawing conclusions, but 
appreciate the interrelation among all components of the 
course including experiments, text and the testing program. 
By experiencing how an IPS class is handled as a group and 
as individuals, the participants are better able to use the 
course to give their students a basic knowledge of physical 
science and to help them learn how this knowledge is ac- 
quired. 

Prerequisite: Concurrent IPS Teaching Assignment. 

Se 502 Physical Science (PS) II Teacher Workshop 

(Credit: 4 Semester Hours) 
This course acquaints teachers with the subject matter, ex- 
periments and teaching styles of the PS II course, the second 
year sequel to IPS. 

As with the IPS Teacher Workshop, participants are intro- 
duced to the course in ways they will be expected to teach it. 

Prerequisite: One year IPS teaching experience and con- 
current PS II teaching assignment. 

Information can be obtained by writing to the Physical Sci- 
ence Group, Newton College, 885 Centre Street, Newton, 
Massachusetts 02159. 



EXTENSION COURSES 



Se 501 Introductory Physical Science (IPS) Teacher 
Workshop (Credit: 6 Semester Hours) 
This course acquaints teachers with the subject matter, ex- 
periments and teaching styles of the IPS course they are 
starting to teach. Participants perform the experiments and 
solve problems in a situation similar to that they are ex- 
pected to maintain in their own classroom. Thus they not 



89 




Board of Trustees 



Catherine Baxter, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Miami, Florida 

Patricia Byrnie '74 
Westbury, New York 

John H. Chandler, Ph.D. 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



Catherine Collins, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

Jane Welch Cronin (Mrs. Daniel A. Cronin), B.A. 
Concord, Massachusetts 

John S. Crowley, M.B.A. 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

Louise Desaulniers, B.A. 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Marion Flynn '74 
Holbrook, Massachusetts 

Jean Ford, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

William J. Gilbane, M.A. 
Providence, Rhode Island 

J. Peter Grace III, M.B.A. 
Manhasset, New York 

Philip B. Hamilton, M.B.A. 
Weston, Massachusetts 

Mary Ford Whalen Kingsley (Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley), B.A. 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Philippe de Lacoste, Ph.D. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

T. Vincent Learson, B.A., L.H.D. 
Rye, New York 

Catherine Maguire, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

Thomas H. D. Mahoney, Ph.D. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Frederick C. Ober, B.A. 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Anne O'Neil, R.S.C.J., M.A., M.S. 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

Mary H. Quinlan, R. S.C.J. , Ph.D. 
Newton, Massachusetts 



90 



Administration 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 
President; Professor of Psychology 

ANNE DUFFEY PHELAN, B.A. 
Assistant to the President 

OFFICE OF THE ACADEMIC DEAN 
KRISTIN MORRISON, Ph.D. 
Academic Dean; Professor of English 

GRAEME BAXTER, B.A. 
Assistant Academic Dean 

CHARLES BOTTICELLI, Ph.D. 

Director, Division of Science and Mathematics 

FRANCES D. FERGUSSON, Ph.D. 
Director, Division of Fine Arts 

MARIE MULLIN McHUGH, Ph.D. 
Director, Division of Humanities 

ROBERT G. ROGERS, Ph.D. 

Director, Division of Social Sciences and Religion 

MARGARET DEVER, Ed.M. 

Director, Continuing Education Program 

UP! HABER-SCHAIM, Ph.D. 
Director, Physical Science Group 

FRANCES A. CONNELLY, M.Ed. 
Registrar 

JEREMY SLINN, A.LA. 
Librarian 

GAY M. RYAN, B.A. 
Director of Admissions 

NANCY HINES VIEHMANN, B.A. 
Director of Career Counseling 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS 

FRANCES de LA CHAPELLE, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Dean of Students 



MARY BETH NASON, M.S. 
Director of Residence Life 

JOAN NORTON, M.Ed. 

Director of Student Financial Aid 

KENNETH MacDONNELL, M.D. 
Director of Student Health Services 

MARGARET McDONNELL, R.S.C.J., R.N. 
Coordinator of Student Health Services 

JOHN M. TOOMEY, S.T.L. 
Chaplain 

JOHN McCALL, S.J., Ph.D. 

Resident Consultant to Counseling Staff 

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 

R. JAMES HENDERSON, M.Ed. 
Vice President 

Business Administration 

THOMAS R. SALM, M.Ed. 
Business Manager 

RICHARD 0. DEE, B.A. 
Assistant Business Manager 

S. MURRAY SIMONS, M.B.A. 
Controller 

EARL FRIOT 

Director of Physical Plant 

RON COHEN, .A.C.A. 
Director of Food Service 

Development 

MARY FRANCES MURPHY, B.A. 
Assistant Director of Development and Director 
of Alumnae Affairs 

ELIZABETH A. BARRY, B.A. 
Director of Publications 

SHIRLEY GOLDWYN, B.A. 
Director of Public Information 



91 



Faculty 



GRIDTH U. ABLON, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Psychology 
B.A. Smith College; Ph.D. Western Reserve University. 

HILDA L ADLER, M.A. 

Instructor in Music 
B.A. Manhattanvilie College; M.A. Claremont Graduate School; 
Post-graduate study at the Juilliard School of Music and the 
University of California at Los Angeles. 

MARY DAY ALBERT, Ph.D. 

Ass/stant Professor of Biology 
B.A. University of New Hampshire; M.A. Bryn Mawr College; 
Ph.D. Boston University. 

JANE APPLETON, B.A. 

Lecturer in Music 
B.A. Wheaton College. 

BRUCE H. BANK, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. Columbia College; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

FRANK A. BELAMARICH, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.A. Montclair State College; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

JAMES C. BERGER, M.A. 

Ass/stant Professor of Political Science 
B.A. University of Delaware; M.A. University of 
Massachusetts; Candidate for Ph.D. University of 
Connecticut. 

JOHN W. BOARDMAN, B.S. 
Instructor in Art 
B.S. Tufts University; Candidate for M.F.A. Tufts University. 

CHARLES R. BOTTICELLI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology; Director, Division of Science and 

Mathematics 
B.A. University of Connecticut; M.A. Williams College; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 



NOEL M. BRAWN, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Chemistry 
B.A. Springhill College; M.A. Brandeis University; Ph.D. 
Brandeis University. 

LILLIAN BRODERICK, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. Newcomb College; M.A. University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

ELIZABETH J. BUCKLEY, M.A. 
Lecturer in English 
B.A. University of Toronto; M.A. University of Wisconsin. 

EDWIN R. CARLISLE, M.A. 

Ass/stant Professor of Economics 
B.A. University of Illinois; M.A. San Francisco College; 
Candidate for Ph.D. Rutgers University. 

AILEEN COHALAN, R.S.C.J., M.Mus. 

Lecturer in Music 
B.Mus. Manhattanvilie College; M.Mus. Boston University; 
Colleague, American Guild of Organists. (On leave 1973-74) 

JOSEPH F. CONWAY, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Political Science and History 
B.A. University of Rochester; M.A. University of Rochester. 

FREDERIC COURTOIS 
Lecturer in Art 
Ecole Saint Luc; Academic des Beaux-Arts, Liege, Belgium. 

NELLY COURTOIS 

Assistant Professor of French 
Diplome, Ecole Centrale de Service Social, Brussels; Brevet, 
Alliance Francaise, Paris; Dipolme Superieur de Langue 
Moderne, Paris. 

ROBERT J. CURRAN, M.A. 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University. 

UBALDO DiBENEDETTO, Ph.D. 

Professor of Italian and Spanish 
B.A. Northeastern University; M.Ed. Bridgewater State 
College; M.A. Middlebury College; Ph.D. University of Madrid. 



92 



FRANCIS J. DOLAN, M.F.A. 

Instructor in Drama 
B.A. Mt. St. Mary's College; M.F.A. Catholic University of 
America. 

MARY CLARISSA DONAHUE, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A. Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Boston 
University; Ph.D. Boston University. 

EDITH DURAND, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Economics 
Oxford University; M.A. Wellesley College; Graduate Study at 
Charles University, Prague, and Columbia University. 

ARTHUR C. ECHTERNACHT, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.A. University of Iowa; M.S. Arizona State University; Ph.D. 
University of Kansas. 

VERA ERDELY, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of French 
M.A. Harvard University; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston College. 

FRANCES D. FERGUSSON, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Art History; Director, 

Division of Fine Arts 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

JOHN H. FLANNAGAN, JR., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of History 
B.A. Holy Cross College; M.A. Detroit University; Ph.D. 
Georgetown University. 

NOEL FRATERRIGO, M.M. 

Instructor in Music 
B.A. Rosary Hill College; M.M. New England Conservatory of 
Music. 

ANTOINETTE DE B. FREDERICK, M.A. 
Instructor in Communications 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. University of Michigan. 

MARIA FUSTER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Licenciada en filosofia y letras (filogia romanica) University 
of Madrid; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston College. 



OFELIA GARCIA, R.S.C.J., M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
Escuela Nacionale de Bellas Artes, La Habana; B.A. 
Manhattanville College; M.F.A. Tufts University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Duke University. (On leave 1973-74) 

LUBOMIR GLEIMAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 
B.A. Thomas More Institute, Montreal; M.A. Institute of 
Medieval Studies, University of Montreal; Graduate Study at 
the University of Bratislava, Slovakia, University of Munich, 
Germany and University of Innsbruck, Austria. 

MARGARET MARY GORMAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
B.A. Trinity College (Washington ); M.A. Fordham University; 
Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

CAROL HURD GREEN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. Regis College; M.A. Georgetown University; Ph.D. 
George Washington University. 

NELSON S. HARTUNIAN, M.A. 

Lecturer in Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
B.S. Tufts University; M.A. Tufts University; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Brandeis University. 

WARREN JONES, B.M. 
Instructor in Music 
B.M. New England Conservatory of Music. 

L EDWARD KAMOSKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.S. Tufts University; M.A. Tufts University; Ph.D. Cornell 
University. 

HERBERT KAYNE, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.A. University of Illinois; M.A. University of Illinois; Ph.D. 
University of Illinois. 

JANA M. KIELY, M.A. 

Lecturer in Biology 
Licence de Sciences Naturelles, Sorbonne; M.A. Radcliffe 
College. 



93 



MARION D. deB. KILSON, Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology 
B.A. Radcliffe College; M.A. Stanford University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

GUILLEMINE de LACOSTE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Ph//osophy 
B.A. Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Georgetown 
University; Ph.D. University of Paris. 

PHILIPPE de LACOSTE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Licentiate in Law, University of Paris; M.A. University of 
Paris; Ph.D. University of Paris. 

AUSTIN H. LAWRENCE, M.S. 
Lecturer in Sociology 
B.A. Boston University; M.S. Simmons College. 

CHARLES K. LEVY, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.A. George Washington University; M.S. George Washington 
University; Ph.D. University of North Carolina. 

DORIS INGRAM LEWIS, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. Duke University; Ph.D. Tufts University. 

HARRY LEWIS, M.S. 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A. University of Miami; M.S. University of Florida; 
Candidate for Ph.D. New York University. 

ELAINE BIGANESS LIVINGSTONE, M.Ph. 

Artist in Residence , 

B.F.A. Massachusetts College of Art; Associate Scholar, 
Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study; M.Ph. Newton 
College. 

JUNE AUSTIN MAALOUF, M.A. 
Instructor in Sociology 
B.A. Pennsylvania State Unversity; M.A. Boston University. 

CATHERINE E. MAGUIRE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.A. Columbia 
University; Ph.D. Fordham University. 



PHILIP MARCUS, M.A. 
Associate Professor of Art 
B.F.A. Tufts University; M.A. 



Harvard University. 



MARY A. McCAY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. Catholic University of America; M.A. Boston College; 
Candidate for Ph.D. Tufts University. 

JAMES W. McCLAIN, B.A. 

Instructor in History 
B.A. Providence College; Graduate study at Boston College 
School of Social Work. 

MARIE MULLIN McHUGH, Ph.D. 

Professor of History; Director, Division of Humanities 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
Radcliffe College. 

FAINE McMULLEN, R.S.C.J., M.A., J.D. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; J.D. Fordham University; 
M.A. Manhattanville College; Graduate study at Catholic 
University of America. 

DOROTHY V. MEYER, Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A. Houghton College; Ed.M. Boston University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Boston University. 

RICHARD HAYES MILLER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of American Studies and History 
B.S. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University; Ph.D. 
Georgetown University. 

KRISTIN D. MORRISON, Ph.D. 

Academic Dean; Professor of English 
B.A. Immaculate Heart College; M.A. St. Louis University; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 



RENEE NAVES, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 
M.S. University of Geneva; Ph.D. 



University of Geneva. 



DAVID NEILL, M.F.A. 
Lecturer in Drama 
B.A. Gordon College; M.F.A. Boston University. 



94 



ANTHONY NEMETHY, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology 
B.A. Academy of Law, Kecskemet; M.S. College of 
Agriculture, Vienna; Ph.D. Royal Hungarian Palatin, Joseph 
University of Technical and Economic Sciences, Budapest. 

ROBERT PERO, M.F.A. 

Instructor in Art 
B.A. University of Massachusetts; M.A. University of Iowa; 
M.F.A. University of Iowa. 

JOHN PHILIBERT, M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design; M.F.A. Rhode Island 
School of Design. 

MARIANNA PINEDA 

Instructor in Art 
Sculpture studies, Bennington College, University of 
California at Berkeley. Scholar, Radcliffe Institute for 
Independent Study. 

KENNETH J. PRESKENIS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. Boston College; M.A. Brown University; Ph.D. Brown 
University. 

CAROL PUTNAM, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Art 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.F.A. Catholic University of 
America; M.A. Catholic University of America; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

MARY H. QUINLAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of History 
B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D. Catholic University of 
America. (On leave 1973-74) 

ROBERT RICHARDS, M.Ed. 

Instructor in Education 
B.Ed. State College at Fitchburg; M.Ed. State College at 
Bridgewater. 

ROBERT G. ROGERS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion; Director, Division of 
Social Sciences and Religion 
B.S. Ohio State University; S.T.B. Boston University School 



of Theology; Ph.D. Boston University; Graduate study at the 
University of London Institute of Archaeology and at the 
School of Oriental and African Studies. 

STEPHEN G. RUDIN, Ed.D. 

instructor in Psychology 
B.A. Brandeis University; Ed.M. Northeastern University; 
Ed.D. University of Illinois. 

LORETTA SANTEN, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Professor Emeritus of Religion 
B.A. Manhattanville College; B.S. Columbia University; M.A. 
Catholic University. 

JUDITH B. SCHAEFER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A. University of Chicago; M.A. University of Chicago; Ph.D. 
University of Chicago. 

ELISABETH T. SCHARLACK, M.A.- 

Lecturer in Art History 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. University of Michigan; 
Candidate for Ph.D. University of Michigan. 

WILLIAM J. SCHICKEL, B.A. 

instructor in Economics 
B.A. University of Notre Dame; Candidate for Ph.D. 
Boston College. 

HOWARD F. SOHN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A. Claremont Men's College; M.A. Manhattan College; 
Ph.D. Fordham University. 

VINCENT SOLOMITA, B. Arch. 

Associate Professor of Art 
B.Arch. Pratt Institute; Study at American Art School of 
Fontainbeau, France; Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris. 

JOHN M. STECZYNSKI, M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A. University of Notre Dame; M.F.A. Yale University 
School of Design. 

ELLEN A. TAXER, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 
M.S. University of Vienna; Ph.D. University of Vienna. 



95 



JAMES F. TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Classics 
B.A. Haverford College; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

GUADALUPE TORRES, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish 
B.A. San Francisco College for Women; M.A. Stanford 
University; Ph.D. Stanford University. 

LUCY ULMAN, Ed.M. 

Associate Professor of Education 
B.S. Boston University; Ed.M. Boston University; Candidate 
for Ed.D. Heed University. 

WILMA G. von JESS, Ph.D. 
Ass/stant Professor of Religion 
B.A. Boston College; Ph.D. Boston College. 

JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 

President; Professor of Psychology 
B.A. Franklin and Marshall College; M.S. Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University. 

ELIZABETH S. WHITE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 
B.A. Manhattanvllle College; M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

EMMETT W. WINDHAM, M.M. 

Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus.Ed. Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; M.M. New 
England Conservatory of Music. 

JUDITH HIRSCHHORN WURTMAN, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S. Wellesley College; M.A. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
George Washington University. 

BOLESLAW A. WYSOCKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
Certificate in Business Administration, University of Cracow; 
Diploma in Psychology and Statistics, University of 
Edinburgh; Certificate, University of Cambridge; M.A. 
University of Cracow; Ph.D. University of London. 



Alumnae Association of Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
National Board of the Alumnae Association 

Mrs. John M. Conroy (Katharine Wilson) 

791 Webster Avenue 

New Rochelle, New York 10805 

Mrs. Robert M. Donahue (Julie Halleran) 

226 Dudley Road 

Brookllne, Massachusetts 02146 

Mrs. John J. Kalagher, Jr. (Mary Prendergast) 

8609 Fox Run 

Potomac, Maryland 20854 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley (Mary Ford Whalen) 

30 Bancroft Road 

Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 02181 

Mrs. John F. McNamara (Susan Bearden) 
786 Vernon Avenue 
Glencoe, Illinois 60022 




96 



Location 

The city of Newton, Massachusetts is located seven 
miles west of downtown Boston, forty-six miles south 
of New Hampshire, forty miles north of Providence, 
and two hundred and ten miles northeast of New 
York City. 

Principal routes serving the city are the Massachu- 
setts Turnpike (whose extension connects Route 128 
with the Northeast and Southeast Expressways), 
Route 128, Route 9, Interstate 40 and Interstate 95. 

The city is served by the Massachusetts Bay Trans- 
portation Authority (MBTA subway and buses), the 
main line of the Boston and Albany Railroad and by 
over two dozen major airlines and railways. Boston's 
Logan Airport and port facilities are within ten miles 
of the College. 

Visitors 

Newton College welcomes visitors to the campus. 
The administrative offices are open Monday through 
Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and by appointment 
on Saturday during term time. The Admissions 
Office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. and from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on 
Saturday. By prior arrangement, special appoint- 
ments may be made on Sunday and holidays. Special 
arrangements for greeting prospective students can 
be made during holiday and vacation periods. Secon- 
dary schools students and their parents who wish an 
interview with a member of the Admissions Office are 
encouraged to arrange a mutually convenient appoint- 
ment well in advance of their trip to the campus. 

Correspondence 

The post office address is Newton College, 885 Centre 
Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02159. Inquiries 
should be addressed as follows: 



General interests of the College 

PRESIDENT 
Academic policies and programs 

ACADEMIC DEAN 
College policy for students; residence halls 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 
Admission of Students 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 
Financial Aid and Fellowships 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCIAL AID 
College fees and payment dates 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Transcripts and permanent records 

REGISTRAR 
Employment of graduates 

DIRECTOR OF CAREER COUNSELING 
Gifts and bequests 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT 
Alumnae Interests 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNAE AFFAIRS 



Accreditation 

Newton College is a member of the New England As- 
sociation of Schools and Colleges which accredits 
educational institutions in the six New England 
States. Membership in one of the six regional ac- 
crediting associations in the United States indicates 
that the school or college has been carefully evalu- 
ated and found to meet the standards agreed upon 
by qualified educators. Newton College also is a 
member of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
the American Council on Education, the Association 
of American Colleges, the National Catholic Educa- 
tional Association and other educational associations. 



97 



51^ 




/ 




Index 



Academic Calendar / IBC 
Academic Policies / 24 
Accidents / 16 
Accreditation / 97 
Administration / 91 
Admissions Requirements / 11 
Admissions Standards / 11 
Advanced Placement / 13, 24 
Advisory Groups / 22 
Alumnae Association / 96 
American Studies / 84 
Application / 11 
Art / 29 
Art History / 30 
Art Studio / 32 
Athletics / 8, 9 
Auditing / 24 

Bachelor of Arts Degree / 21 

Bachelor of Science Degree / 21 

Barat House / 6 

Biology / 61 

Black Students' Association / 8 

Board of Trustees / 90 

Campus / 3, 5, 97 
Campus Visits / 12, 97 
Career Counseling / 23 
Chemistry / 63 
Chorus / 8 

Christian Service Committee / 8 
Classics / 39 

College Entrance Tests / 12 
Communications / 40 
Comparative Literature / 41 
Continuing Studies / 14 
Correspondence / 97 
Counseling Services / 10 
Courses of Instruction / 28 
Course Listing Notation / 28 
Credit, other Academic Work / 24 
Cross-Registration / 25 
Curriculum / 21 

Deferred Admission / 13 
Degrees Offered / 21 
Divisional Structure / 28 
Division of Fine Arts / 29 
Division of Humanities / 39 
Division of Science 

and Mathematics / 58 
Division of Social Sciences 

and Religion / 67 
Division of Special Programs / 84 
Dormitories / 6 
Double Majors / 23 



Drama / 35 
Drama Club / 8 
Dual-Degree Program / 59 

Early Admission / 13 
Early Decision Plan / 12 
Economics / 67 
Education Program / 85 
885 / 8 
English / 41 
Expenses / 15 
Experimental College / 9 
Extension Courses / 89 

Faculty / 92 

Federal Programs / 19 

Fees / 15 

Fellowships / 19 

Financial Aid / 17 

Foreign Students / 13 

French / 53 

French Club / 8 

Freshman-Sophomore Program / 21 

German / 56 
Grading System / 26 

History / 45 
Honors / 26 

The Idiom / 8 
Incomplete Grades / 26 
Independent Study / 24 
Interdisciplinary Majors / 23 
Interest Committee / 7 
Interview / 12 
Introduction / 3 
Italian / 56 

Leave of Absence / 27 

Liberal Studies Program / 87 

Library / 23 

Living Environment / 5 

Loans / 19 

Location / 97 

Major Studies / 22 
Mathematics / 64 
Medical Services / 10 
Minors / 23 
Music Program / 36 

Newtones / 8 

Parking Permit Fees / 16 
Pass/Fail Courses / 26 



Philosophy / 49 
Physical Education / 89 
Physical Science Group / 89 
Plans of Payment / 17 
Political Science / 70 
Presidential Committees / 7 
Pre-medlcal Studies / 58 
Psychology / 73 
Psychology Club / 8 
Putnam Art Center / 6 

Reading Courses / 24 
Readmission / 27 
Recommendation / 11 
Refund Policy / 17 
Registered Nurses / 14 
Registration / 25 
Registry / 90 
Religion / 10, 77 
Reservation Deposit / 16 
Resource Centers / 23 
Rolling Admissions / 12 
Romance Languages / 52 
Room and Board / 15 

Schedule of Payments / 17 

Scholarships / 18 

Science / 58 

Secondary School Transcript / 11 

Sickness / 10, 16 

Social Committee / 7 

Social Life / 9 

Sociology / 81 

Spanish / 55 

Sponsored Research / 89 

Spring Festival / 8 

Student Employment / 19 

Student Governance / 7 

Student Health Insurance / 16 

Student Organizations / 7 

Study Abroad / 24 

Transfer Students / 13 
Tuition / 15 

Unit System / 24 
Urban Studies / 82 

Visitors / 12, 97 

The Well / 8 
Withdrawals / 25, 27 
Women at Newton College / 5 

Young Democratic Club / 8 
Young Republican Club / 8 



99 



CALENDAR 1973-74 



First Semester 

Monday, September 3 Labor Day 

Wednesday, September 5 
Thursday, September 6 

through 
Sunday, September 9 
Friday, September 7 
Sunday, September 9 



Juniors Arrive 



Freshman Orientation 



Monday, September 10 

Monday, September 17 

Tuesday, September 18 

Monday, October 8 

Monday, October 22 

Friday, November 16 (5:00 p.m.) 

through 
Sunday, November 25 
Monday, November 26 
Monday, December 17 

through 
Friday, December 21 
Friday, December 21 (5:00 p.m.) 



College Registration (Freshmen and Juniors) 
College Registration (Seniors, Sophomores, 
and Day Students) 
Classes Begin 

Academic Registration (Juniors and Seniors) 
Academic Registration (Freshmen and Sophomores) 
Columbus Day (No Classes) 
Veteran's Day (No Classes) 
Reading Period 

and 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Classes Resume 

Examination and 
Evaluation Period 
End of Semester 



"January Period" 



Wednesday, January 2 

through 
Sunday, January 27 



Monday, January 28 
Monday, February 4 
Tuesday, February 5 
Monday, February 18 
Monday, March 18 
Friday, April 5 (5:00 p.m.) 

through 
Monday, April 15 
Tuesday, April 16 
Friday, May 3 

through 
Wednesday, May 8 
Thursday, May 9 

through 
Wednesday, May 15 
Wednesday, May 15 (5:00 p.m.) 
Sunday, May 19 



Second Semester 

Classes Begin 



Academic Registration (Juniors and Seniors) 
Academic Registration (Freshmen and Sophomores) 
Washington's Birthday (No Classes) 
Mini Break (No Classes) 
Spring Vacation 

and 
Easter Observance 
Classes resume 

Reading Period 

Examination and 
Evaluation Period 

End of Semester 
Commencement 



Newton College 

Newton, Massachusetts 



02159